Wunderlich skid plate

Discussion in 'Parallel Universe' started by JGoody, Apr 25, 2012.

  1. JGoody

    JGoody Been here awhile

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    I have an F658. Has anyone got the Wunderlich Extreme skid plate? Seems to come with the mounting hardware so the price is similar to Moto Overland etc. (as I'd have to buy the $45 BMW mounting kit for most skid plates)The "hidden underplate" design is interesting. Thoughts?
    http://www.wunderlichamerica.com/motorcycle/8500132.html
    #1
  2. Tom Morrison

    Tom Morrison Adventurer

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    I've got one on my 658. I think the underplate is a good design, as it offers a second layer of perforation protection along with that, it should distribute impact loading over the four bolts used to mount the sub-plate.

    Only down-side that I see, is that you need to remove it to change the oil.

    Cheers
    #2
  3. JGoody

    JGoody Been here awhile

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    Am I correct that the mounting kit is included -- as my bike has no skid plate or mounting kit now?
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  4. mrmrva

    mrmrva wannabe adventurer

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    It says it does in the user review at the link you posted.
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  5. JGoody

    JGoody Been here awhile

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    Touratech also comes with mounting kit -- it looks kinda minimal -- anyone with experience with the TT plate?
    #5
  6. Motoriley

    Motoriley Still riding like crap after all these years.

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    You won't need two layers with the MOD plate, it is beefy. I've hit some pretty big rocks and where the Touratech one caved in this one just shrugged it off. You can also change the oil with it on the bike, as long as it is on the sidestand, DAMHIK.. It is also very easy to remove and replace. I mean in like 1 minute. You don't have to fuss with that front bolt inside the plate, packed with crud and then deal with trying to get it back in to a bent mount....They also have a very nice toolkit that mounts down there and actually doesn't act like a water and dirt holder like the Touratech one. My 2 cents etc...etc...
    #6
  7. JGoody

    JGoody Been here awhile

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    I get the feeling that at the end of the day Dave'll get my $ for the MOD skid plate, rack, side stand foot and who knows what else!!! Help!!!!
    #7
  8. Casejeep

    Casejeep Been here awhile

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    It offers no protection to the pipes or oil filter. Buy something else.
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  9. Manventure

    Manventure Been here awhile

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    It's well known that I am a MOD fan but I will pitch in anyway. I looked at virtually every plate on the market and in the end was very impressed with the Altrider and the MOD plates. Because I am local to Altrider I stopped by and got EXCELLENT customer service from them and actually ended up being their Lexan HL Guard but in the end decided the MOD was the way to go due to the excellent coverage (Alt didn't cover the CAT) and the ease with which it goes on and off in a pinch.

    The other thing that I consider critical is the customer service, technical support and community support and I would give MOD (and Altrider) an A+ in that regards also.
    #9
  10. Tom Morrison

    Tom Morrison Adventurer

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    To the pipes it does, and there is a oil filter guard available. The main plate is the same thickness as the MOD (4mm), and as stated before, the sub plate provides both an added layer of protection as well as impact isolation that lessens the chance of cracking the engine case at the mounting flanges.
    #10
  11. BMW_BIKER_KEITH

    BMW_BIKER_KEITH Been here awhile

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    +++ 1
    #11
  12. GrendelMk1

    GrendelMk1 Adventurer

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    The very first mod that went on my bike was a bash plate, precisely because I looked at where the oil heat exchanger and filter were and thought "fuck THAT". Why on earth would someone build a plate that requires yet another addon to protect the filter?
    #12
  13. Tom Morrison

    Tom Morrison Adventurer

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    In the end, the biggest limitation of all the //twin GS skid plates is that they are bolted to the engine case. As such, larger surface area does not mean more protection. Hit something hard enough, and it will "Fuck That", engine case.

    The second plate of the Wunderlich does add a layer of impact isolation that some other plates don't have. The only way to determine the best overall plate would be to do an expensive destructive test.
    #13
  14. GrendelMk1

    GrendelMk1 Adventurer

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    The front of my skidplate looks like it's been through the wars. Not from coming down hard on things, but from having the front tire pick up rocks from the road surface. Some of those rocks have been big and pointy, and make noises like someone's down there with a hammer. How many 3 or 4 inch rock chunks can we throw at the oil filter before it splits open? More coverage DOES equal more protection, and I stand by my disbelief that anyone would fail to cover critical and vulnerable components that are right down in front if they're bothering to build a plate.
    #14
  15. Tom Morrison

    Tom Morrison Adventurer

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    Hey, what ever works for you. I'll stand by my statement that the lack of a perimiter frame, and the abundance of weight on the //twin GS bikes is THE limiting factor when it comes to the utility of adding a skid plate to them.

    Hit something big enough, fast enough, then something will break. In my view, the sub-plate on the Wunderlich offers improved chance that the thing that breaks won't be the engine case.

    In the end, the only way to objectively evaluate one skid plate against another, would be to use destructive testing to determine the over-all best.
    #15
  16. JGoody

    JGoody Been here awhile

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    Is a puzzlement! Obviously the skid plate with the rubber mounts needs to absorb shock so that the engine is protected -- wouldn't that indicate that the rigidity and thickness of the plate at some point becomes counterproductive -- better to trash the plate than the engine? Kind of like crumple zones in a car?
    #16
  17. Tom Morrison

    Tom Morrison Adventurer

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    A bit of flexibility is good, but at the point where the plate makes contact with the engine case, the plate can do nothing more to protect it. Better to spread the force of impact over all of the mount points. As such, I think thicker and stiffer is better. You just need to remember that putting any skid plate on a BMW F series will not turn it into a trials bike.
    #17
  18. Tom Morrison

    Tom Morrison Adventurer

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    Further to my comments above:

    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=711728

    I'd say any skid plate that uses the same mounting kit as the BMW version could punch through the oil pan in the same manner.
    #18
  19. toowheels

    toowheels on a mission...

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    My thoughts on skid plate design pertaining to this bike series:

    1. The skid plate does have to be a certain thickness to withstand impacts. Some have shown to be just too thin and therefore not protecting from something that just shouldn't have done any significant damage. Also a certain thickness will give the structure more integrity dispersing impacts across the whole plate and all the mounts. Some flexibility in the material too.

    2. The front bracket is integral to the skid plate design! Too weak and and you will unduly break the rubber breakaway engine mounts below (and the bend/break the bracket). Many of them are quite thin and don't offer much support. Too thick and it'll put too much stress on the front bracket mounting in a impact. The bracket and the lower mounts are still meant to be sacrificial in the event of a significant impact.

    3. No sharp edges anywhere within the skid plate and bracket! If it does come to the skid plate mounting being broken you don't want any sharp edges to puncture anything.

    4. Obviously complete coverage of everything down there! That's what it's for! For me that includes the oil filter, cooler, lines, headers (front and side) and the cat.

    5. No hardware sticking out of the bottom at all. Nothing to hang-up and break the mounts, while still trying to preserve as much ground clearance as possible. The material around the bottom mounting holes being supported is nice too so it doesn't get manged down there over time and gives more support to the structure.

    6. A shallow angle of attack in the front. If you hit something tall in the front you want the skid plate to as easily as possible (for a 500lb. bike :lol3) "slide" over it. On the same idea cat coverage at the back with a smooth transition.

    That's my 10c!

    So far, so good too.

    Dave
    #19
  20. GrendelMk1

    GrendelMk1 Adventurer

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    I'm not going to argue that protection from heavy impacts is worthless. However, my original point was that if you're going to bother building a plate AT ALL, you should protect all the things that are A) important and B) mounted low and/or in front. I've noticed a tendency across many bikes to put the oil filter out front and down low, right where any damn thing can rip 'em open. Oil/coolant exchangers tend to live in the same neighborhood. Again, why the heck would any manufacturer build a plate that doesn't provide cover for critical components?

    Needing to buy an add-on for your add-on just to protect the basics is bullshit.

    I don't give a shit how well something takes "I've been really stupid" impacts if I can cripple my bike by riding in a straight line through semi-fresh rip-rap. I don't slow down for rip-rap, because it's like really nasty, large, sharp-edged gravel, and I can ride a pretty clean line through it. My plate better keep the resulting crap outta the lube system. And, the MOD plate is one choice that does.

    Incidentally, I have a good friend with a V-strom, whom I told I wouldn't go off-pavement with until he got good tires and a plate. His Scorpion plate also covers ALL the important bits (oil cooler, oil filter, oil pan, cat) but doesn't pretend that it'll save the bike from an orbital insertion ;) Fortunately, I know he's a good rider, and he won't airdrop* his bike onto a pointy rock.

    I think I mentioned all this before, but I really need to get the concept of "cover the basics FIRST" across. Airdropping your shit is cool, but it pales beside actually being able to NOT worry about your fluids going bye-bye.

    And honestly, if you're into shit where you can't even pick a least-bad line, WTF are you doing on a bike that comes in at 450ish lbs? My MOD plate looks like some demented map of Uzfarkistan's population density from all the assorted flying crap and off-center dings, but I've been careful to NOT drop my entire bike a whole foot onto the oilpan region at 40 kph, because I'm not stupid. On the other hand, I've heard things that sound like a dwarf army with hammers working the plate, and I've FELT the whole bike cant to one side when the plate eats a rock off-center, with a PLANG! to let me know I screwed up.

    If you need multiple layers, may I suggest you either buy a lighter bike, or learn to look ahead? Actually, if you can't even figure out looking ahead, how did you get licensed to ride on the road?

    Armor's good, but if YOU can't ride, no plate will save you.

    *Any piece of hardware can be airdropped once. No one said it had to be usable afterwards, did they?
    #20