WV Historical Markers - Let's Find All 700

Discussion in 'Southeast, The Lair of the Dragon - The Blue Ridge' started by pnoman, Nov 16, 2008.

  1. elroyjetsn

    elroyjetsn Mountain Fan

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    Will be praying, too!

    Those blood clots are scarey business:(:
  2. vatrader01

    vatrader01 vatrader01

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    Prayers and best wishes for a speedy recovery.
  3. freaking RT

    freaking RT will golf for food

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    just outside Richmond, VA
    she had better be your #1 :D Send her our best and thoughts :thumb
  4. WVChrome

    WVChrome KLR Owner

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    Morgantown, WV
    Finally! A chance to post this marker I snagged almost two weeks ago. First one with the new bike too. The Bryan Family marker is located along US Rt. 60 in Cabell county, just west of Ona.

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    This marker was painted recently according to locals. It marks the location of the home of the grandparents of "The Great Commoner."

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Jennings_Bryan

    Later,
    Chrome...
  5. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    The Dr said my wife could come home this evening. She still has some exams and a while of taking it easy ahead, but SHE'S HOME :D .

    Thanks, everyone, for your thoughts and prayers.

    Maybe next week I can take a ride and re-join the Markers Thread. I'm sure she'll want me out of the house before long. (I have that effect on women :lol3 )
  6. freaking RT

    freaking RT will golf for food

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    just outside Richmond, VA

    :clap :clap :clap
  7. vatrader01

    vatrader01 vatrader01

    Joined:
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    Here's a straggler I've been putting off until I could have a full day to go get this marker.

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    Marker is located on Rt 259, in Lost City, Hardy County WV.


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    The obligatory Bike-In-The-Photo-With-The-Marker. In the back round is the Lost River Baptist Church. Behind this church is a cemetery, and next is that is the Ivanhoe Presbyterian Church.

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    Luckily, my Columbia School of Sleuthing Correspondence Course kicks in, and a full fledged investigation begins. Neither of these two churches are THE Church indicated on the marker. Presbyterian Church built in 1898-99.
    Baptist Church is frame construction. Markers in Cemetery don't go back to the 1700's. 300 yards +- east of the marker is cow pasture. And these....

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    There is a controversial dam system project at Lost City. Looks like all the makings for "Deliverance ll." I'll keep my eye out for a cattle call.

    My sleuthing revealed this tid-bit: From the WV Archives and History, "A brief history of Lost River Area"


    by F. B. Chrisman
    1925

    The Wardens who settled on the farm now owned by Wm. H. Warden were Presbyterians; the Millers and Bakers (the latter family being the first permanent settlers at Baker) were Baptists. Anthony Miller, a Baptist, deeded one acre of land, probably about 1835, jointly to the Baptists and Presbyterians as a site for the first church in the Lost River Valley. The people of the community built the log church which is still standing and is now used by the Union Tanning Company for a store room.

    So. The location of the Church remains a mystery.


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    Lost City is slowly fading, the post office appears to the only enterprise left in town.


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    I rode a path less traveled to get to this marker. The maker of this sign is a master of understatement. At mile three, two skinny goats couldn't pass.

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    Low traffic count for a Sunday.

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    Up.

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    Down.

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    Around.

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    Gawk.

    West Virginia Marker Hunting. A tough job. Somebody's gotta do it.
  8. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    My wife was released from the hospital Thursday evening, and is back to work (at a slower pace), so I took Tuesday to go on a relaxing ride up to Wheeling on Rt 250.

    Located about 20 miles northwest of Fairmont, and just south of the southwest corner of PA, along Rt 250. This is a great ride! Lots of curves, hills, scenery, etc. For years, I ignored this section of WV and now kick myself. :baldy I guess all the great riding isn't just in the eastern half of the state! Oh well, better to discover it late than never.



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    Historical Marker on Rt 250 at the Marion Co / Wetzel Co line. This is Side #1, is you are heading southeast toward Fairmont, as you enter Marion Co.

    For more on Marion Co: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marion_County,_West_Virginia




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    View on Rt 250 entering Marion Co.




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    Same Marker, Side #2, heading northwest toward Moundsville & Wheeling.

    For more on Wetzel Co: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wetzel_County,_West_Virginia


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    View northwest on Rt 250 entering Wetzel Co.


    A very enjoyable ride, except when I got stuck behind a guy driving 35MPH. There are stretches of 8-10 miles with no passing zones. :eek1 Very frustrating to be on such a great road going that slow. I.... must ..... learn .... patience.............
  9. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    Population 344. It's a piece of nice, clean, small-town America hidden away between other towns on Rt 250 that have decayed into ruin.

    Named for one of it's earliest citizens, Henry Church, who lived to be 109. Hundred is so named because Henry Church would sit on a rocking chair on his porch near the train station. As the train came into the station, people would say "There's old Hundred," referring to his age. Eventually the name stuck and the station- and the town- became known as Hundred.



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    Historical Marker located on Rt 250 in downtown Hundred.




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    View of the town entering northbound on Rt 250. American flags flying, yards mowed, nice city park -- all that's missing is Sheriff Andy Taylor and Barney Fife.



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    Marker is located where Main Street turns off Rt 250. Next to the marker is a memorial to those lost in WWII.



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    Main St.




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    Memorial to those who died in WWII.
  10. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    Fort Wetzel...Marshall County (W)VA Fort Wetzel was a stockade fort situated on Wheelng Creek, now in Sand Hill District, Marshall County. The builders and defenders were John Wetzel and his five sons - Martin, Lewis, Jacob, George and John - the most noted Indian fighters that ever dwelt on the West Virginia frontier. Stories of their adventures with the Indians and some of the personal history can be found in history books.


    Interesting article on Lewis Wetzel : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewis_Wetzel



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    Historical Marker located on Rt 250 in Limestone, about 5 miles east of Moundsville.




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    View westbound on Rt 250 heading towards Moundsville.
  11. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    Col. Joseph Beeler's Station [​IMG]
    (1779 - unknown), Beeler's Station
    A settlers' stockaded defense. Garrisoned by the state militia in 1781. Attacked by Indians in 1782.
    (NOTE: the WVA state marker says "George" Beeler.)

    A stockade erected in 1779 by Colonel Joseph Beeler at Beeler Station Church, eight miles from the site of the town of Cameron, Marshall County. Designated as "Beeler's Station." A garrison of fifty men was stationed there in 1781.

    Colonel Beeler represented to the national authorities
    that, because if the almost constant presence of Indians about the
    "Station," it was impossible for him to defend it longer, and in 1781
    a garrison of 53 men under Capt. Jeremiah Long was stationed there.
    This made it possible for white men to hold possession of the region
    round about.



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    Historical Marker located on Rt 250 at Beeler's Station, about 10-12 miles East/Southeast of Moundsville. According to several historical websites, it should read "Jospeh Beeler", not "George Beeler". This marker was listed as missing, so it pays to double check all markers and not dismiss any of them.



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    View westbound ont Rt 250.
    Rubbertoe likes this.
  12. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    Located near the bottom of the Northern Panhandle, just north of the Mason-Dixon Line. Population - about 10,000. Home of the West Virginia Penitentiary until it closed in 1995 (now open for tours!) Named for the Grave Creek Indian Mound (see upcoming post on that Historical Marker).



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    Historical Marker located on the Courthouse Square in Moundsville. Lots of construction going on, and a large fence kept me from getting any closer. That also explains why it appears everyone in Moundsville wears hardhats :lol3 .




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    Side #2 of the same marker.

    In the spring of 1774, Captain James Harrod, a Pennsylvanian by birth, collected at the mouth of Grave Creek, now Moundsvllle, Marshall County, West Virginia, a party of thirty-one young men, for the purpose of making a settlement in Kentucky. Descending the Ohio to the mouth of the Kentucky river, they thence Journeyed through the wilderness to the Big Spring, now in Mercer county. Here they were engaged in founding Harrodsburg, the oldest town in Kentucky, when they were discovered by Daniel Boone and Michael Stoner who had been sent by Lord Dunmore to warn John Floyd, Deputy Surveyor of Flncastle county, Virginia, which then included all of Kentucky, together with his assistants, then at the Falls of the Ohio, that an Indian War was begun. Harrod and party abandoned their settlement, and proceeded to the Holston Valley, where he and twenty-seven of his men Joined the Fincastle Battalion, and with Christian, arrived at Point Pleasant the evening after the battle.



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    View of the Marshall Co Courthouse and Marker.
  13. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    Located across the street from the old WV Penitentiary in Moundsville, it is also the namesake for it's hometown.

    Excerpts from the WV Division of Culture and History Website:

    The heart of the site is probably the most famous and certainly the largest of the Adena Burial mounds. A massive undertaking, the total effort required the movement of more than 60,000 tons of earth. Artifacts and exhibits interpreting the lifestyle of the Adena people are displayed in the Delf Norona Museum, adjacent to the 2,000 year old mound. The museum also features a gift shop and a gallery where fine art is exhibited throughout the year. Grave Creek Archaeological Complex also maintains a 150-seat theater with a small stage.

    The most impressive and largest Adena mound, Grave Creek Mound is the largest conical type of any of the mound builder structures. Construction of the mound took place in successive stages from about 250-150 B.C., as indicated by the multiple burials at different levels within the structures. In 1838, road engineers measured its height at 69 feet and its at the base as 295 feet. Originally a moat of about 40 feet in width and five feet in depth with one causeway encircled it.


    The first recorded excavation of the mound took place in 1838, conducted by local amateurs. To gain entrance to the mound, two shafts, one vertical and one horizontal were created. This led to the most significant discovery of two burial vaults.

    In addition to the Adena ornaments and remains found in the interior, the upper vault contained a small flat sandstone tablet. Later, authenticity of the tablet and the meaning of its inscription became quite controversial. Though the stone has never been authenticated and has been disputed by most professionals, a replica of the original is on display in the museum.


    For more information on Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grave_Creek_Mound



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    Historical Marker located at the entrance to the museum next to the mound.



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    View of the entrance to the museum.




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    View of the mound. Partially hidden behind the trees.



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    To put the size in perspective, check out the small utility building and the entrance door.
  14. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

    Joined:
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    Location:
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    Located just across the street from the Grave Creek Indian Mound (see previous post) in Moundsville.

    Excerpts from Wikipedia: Click here for full article


    The West Virginia State Penitentiary is a retired, Gothic style prison located in Moundsville. It operated from 1876 to 1995. Currently, the site is maintained as a tourist attraction and training facility.

    The West Virginia State Penitentiary's design is similar to the facility at Joliet with its castellated Gothic, stone structure, complete with turrets and battlements, except only half the size.<SUP> </SUP> Unfortunately, the original architectural designs have been lost.<SUP> </SUP> The dimensions of the parallelogram-shaped prison yard are 82½ feet in length, by 352½ feet in width. The stone walls are 5 feet (1.5 m) thick at the base, tapering to 2½ feet at the top, with foundations 5 feet (1.5 m) deep.<SUP> </SUP> The center tower section is 682 feet (208 m) long.<SUP> </SUP>It lies at the western side of the complex along Jefferson Avenue and is considered the front, as this is where the main entrance is located.<SUP> </SUP>The walls here are 24 feet (7.3 m) high and 6 feet (1.8 m) wide at the base, tapering to 18 inches (460 mm) towards the top.

    In 1983, Charles Manson requested to be transferred to this prison to be nearer to his family. His request was denied.

    From 1899 to 1959, ninety-four men were executed. Hanging was the method of execution until 1949 with eighty-five men meeting that fate. The public could attend hangings until 19 June 1931. On that date, Frank Hyer was executed for murdering his wife. However, when the trap door beneath him was opened and his full weight was put onto the noose, he was instantly decapitated. Following this event, attendance at hangings was by invitation only.<SUP> </SUP> The last man to face execution by hanging, Bud Peterson from Logan County, lies in the prison's cemetery, as his family refused to claim his body.<SUP> </SUP>Beginning in 1951, electrocution became the means of execution. Ironically, the electric chair used by the prison was originally built by an inmate there, Paul Glenn.<SUP> </SUP> Nine men died in the chair until the state outlawed execution entirely in 1965.<SUP> </SUP> The original chair is on display in the facility and is a part of the official tour.

    After closing in 1995, most inmates were transferred to the Mt. Olive Correctional Complex in Fayette County.




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    Historical Marker located inside the fence by the entrance. Not much chance of this marker being stolen, eh?






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    View of the entrance. What is that thing on the roof - Mothman???? :huh




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    View down the front of the Penitentiary.
  15. elroyjetsn

    elroyjetsn Mountain Fan

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
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    Location:
    Martinsburg, WV
    Looks a lot like the Baltimore City lockup.
  16. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    Located on Rt 2 just as you are leaving northbound out of Moundsville, near Glen Dale. Charles Lindberg landed here as part of a nationwide tour just 3 months after becoming the first to fly solo across the Atlantic.

    For a complete and interesting background to this event, click here.

    Although nothing remains today of that hanger or airfield, a portion of the airfield is kept mowed and the site now is parceled out as a baseball diamond, a large, private vegetable garden and the Moundsville Water Pumping Station.



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    Historical Marker located on Rt 2 between Moundsville and Glen Dale.




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    I wonder if "Lindy" stopped in for a Blizzard? Mmmmm, cookie dough Blizzard. :D




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    View of the area between Rt 2 and the Ohio River. The road leads to the water pumping station and baseball diamond. This was the only clearing I could see, so maybe it's part of the original field????
  17. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    Location:
    West Virginia
    Dr. Harriet Beecher Jones was an amazing lady - the first female physician in West Virginia, and advocate for the creation of the Women's Hospital in Wheeling, the State Tuberculosis Sanitarium (later Hopemont State Hospital in Terra Alta), the West Virginia Children's Home in Elkins, the West Virginia Industrial Home for Girls in Salem, and many more institutions for the public good. She was also the first woman to be elected to the WV House of Delegates. Wow!! :eek1

    To read more about this fascinating lady, click here.

    Not to be confused with Harriet Beecher Stowe

    BTW - This marker is not even included on the WV Markers Master List. What a surprise riding along and seeing this! And you thought marker hunting was mundane.... :lol3 .



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    Historical Marker is located on Rt 2 northbound in Glen Dale at the County Roads building.



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    View northbound on Rt 2.
  18. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

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    OK, for those of you following the WV Tag-O-Rama, this one will look familiar. It's the current tag (as of 14-20 July), so I won't give out too many details of the exact location until it's tagged.

    [ Edit - 22 July 2009 : It was tagged, so I'll give out the location as 6 miles southeast of Moundsville on CR 54. When you see the SMALL sign for Rosby's Rock, turn left and cross the SMALL bridge. Turn right, go about 200 meters until you see a straightish dirt road off to the right. Follow that out about 1/2 mile. The rock suddenly appears out of nowhere on your left. ]

    On Christmas Eve, 1852, the B&O railroad track was completed at Rosby's Rock. The railroad was the first to connect the Atlantic Ocean with the Ohio River. It connected Baltimore, Maryland to Wheeling, (West) Virginia.


    Read more:

    http://www.wvculture.org/goldenseal/winter05/rosby.html




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    Historical Marker located along Rt 2 just north of 12th St (in the southbound lane).




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    The rock - Read the article on the link above to find out why there are two different spellings.




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    View of the hard-packed dirt road past the rock.


    More to follow after it's tagged. :D (Done)
  19. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,647
    Location:
    West Virginia
    From Wikipedia:

    As recounted by Willis De Haas in History of Early Settlement and Indian Wars of West Virginia, mysterious smoke was reported south of Wheeling in the McMechen area. Wheeling residents were concerned that Indians had attacked and burned the stockade and houses of Mr. Tomlinson. Colonel David Shepherd dispatched Captain Foreman and 45 men to investigate the source of the smoke to the south. Captain Foreman discovered the settlements at McMechen to be intact with no evidence of Indian attacks. After staying the night at McMechen, the party returned north on the morning of Sunday, September 26. Frontier guides familiar with the area suggested to Captain Foreman that he and his party should leave the path at the river bottom and return to Wheeling by way of the ridge. A man named Lynn explained to the commander that Indians in the area had probably noted the party's movements and crossed the river during the night. They would most likely attack the group at the river. Foreman refused this advice and ordered his men to stay on the lower route. Lynn and a group of six or eight others ignored Foreman's orders and followed the ridge path.

    When the party reached the extreme upper end of the McMechen Narrows, the men under Foreman's command broke ranks to investigate a display of Indian trinkets strewn across the path. As the entire party gathered around the trinkets, two lines of Indians from both sides of the path opened fire in a coordinated ambush. The men of Foreman's party who escaped the initial volley were pursued as they tried to escape up the hill to the ridge. The Indian force, numbering 20 to 25 men, suffered no known casualties.

    Lynn and his party, upon hearing the guns, rushed down the hill toward the site of the ambush "hallooing as if they were five times as numerous" (De Haas). Their efforts caused the Indians to retreat, but not after killing Captain Foreman and 21 of his men, including two of Foreman's sons. The account of men killed in the ambush included: Captain William Foreman, Edward Peterson, Benjamin Powell, Hambleton Foreman, James Greene, John Wilson, Jacob Pew, Isaac Harris, Robert McGrew, Elisha Shriver, Henry Risera, Batholomew Viney, Anthony Miller, John Vincent, Solomon Jones, William Ingle, Nathan Foreman, and Abraham Powell.

    Several days after the ambush, a group from Wheeling reinforced by troops from Fort Pitt, Pennsylvania and led by Colonel Shepherd buried the dead in one grave at the head of the narrows where they fell.



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    Historical Marker located on Rt 2 in McMechan, about 4 miles north of Moundsville - small turnout and park area on the northbound side.



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    There is also a stone monument located about 50 feet away from the marker.



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    Inscription on the monument's plaque reads: Near this spot occurred the massacre by Indians of Captain William Foreman and twenty one of his men on September 27th, 1777. (Erected by the Wheeling Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution)
  20. pnoman

    pnoman Just Average

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
    2,647
    Location:
    West Virginia
    Located on the southern tip of Wheeling along Rt 2 / 250. Just south of where I-70 cuts through the northern panhandle.


    For more on Marshall County: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marshall_County,_West_Virginia

    For more on Ohio County: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ohio_County,_West_Virginia





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    Historical Marker located on Rt 2 / 250 southbound lane just south of Wheeling.




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    View southbound on Rt 2 / 250. Not real scenic at the moment due to construction. Otherwise, nice views of the Ohio River.



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    Same Marker, side #2.




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    View northbound on Rt 2 / 250.