XL500Scout- Restomod

Discussion in 'Some Assembly Required' started by shinyribs, May 12, 2018.

  1. Roadracer_Al

    Roadracer_Al louder, louder, louder!

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    Is RFY the brand? Ebay shocks, I assume?

    Nice work on the piston. I think I see that you chamfered the edges of the ports? Good. Sharp edges are how you get cavitation. Did you do the work on a mill?

    For the peanut gallery, one of the limitations of the ability to adjust damping via the shim stacks is the ability to flow through the piston. Which is why the original piston is so comically bad, and the new piston is an improvement.

    If you have a rotary table and wanted to commit about 300% more effort, you could do pistons with "wagon wheel" trapezoidal ports to get more open area on the pistons.

    Also, rebound is a fixed value that only needs adjustment when the oil degrades in velocity (the only force inputs for rebound are the spring and bike weight.) If you iterate, try reducing rebound port area until it becomes a problem. That gives up more piston real estate so you can bias the port area towards the compression side for a wider range of adjustability.
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  2. shinyribs

    shinyribs Thumpers for life

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    Thanks man, I appreciate that.
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  3. shinyribs

    shinyribs Thumpers for life

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    Just turned the majority of the piston on the lathe, did the ports with a drill press. I don't own a mill...yet!

    Yes, the RFY are the shocks you see on eBay. That is the actual brand name of them.

    If you look close at the should you'll notice the compression stack isn't really a shim stack at all. It's a wavy washer and larger, solid washer with scallops on the ID. So the each wavy washer would hold the scalloped washer up to the valve to block the outer ports. The fluid had to flow through the wavy washer, through the scallops in the washer and then through the inner series of ports. Then, in the reverse direction(compression), the wavy washer would flatten to allow fluid through the outer ports. The tension of that wavy washer was the shim stack. :lol3

    The way I have it now, the fluid has to flow around the OD of the compression shim stack and get in to those straight grooves you see cut in to one side to access the inner ports for rebound. It's cheesy, but I was running out of room!
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  4. Roadracer_Al

    Roadracer_Al louder, louder, louder!

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    Very interesting setup! Orifice damping but with a directional cutoff. Tricky. Clever. If it works well enough, that's all you need.
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  5. shinyribs

    shinyribs Thumpers for life

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    True, but it wasn't working well, thus the new piston. The other piston was so loose in the bore I think most of the oil was just blowing around the outside anyway. But yeah, the check valve approach was kinda neat. Not a lot of options with a 1" diameter.
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  6. Roadracer_Al

    Roadracer_Al louder, louder, louder!

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    I wonder if a 3D printed piston would work or if the forces are too high...
  7. Roofchop

    Roofchop Hands up mother stickers, this is a f**k up!

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    They can 3D print titanium now $$$$
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  8. DeepBarney

    DeepBarney International Bumbler

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    Yeah, PA-66 nylon should be up to the task. But like mentioned above powder metal printing is readily available too.
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  9. shinyribs

    shinyribs Thumpers for life

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    The shims bend pretty easily, so I don't think the forces are very high, but I'm not sure if you would have issues with a "plastic" valve flexing or not. In my imagination, I think the two biggest issues to overcome would be a surface finish smooth enough to seal against the shims properly and a body sturdy enough to also seal properly ( not flexing) causing erratic damping. I'm sure a solution could be come up with. That would definitely open up some possibilities with port designs!
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  10. shinyribs

    shinyribs Thumpers for life

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    My ignition switch plastic clip holdy in thingys got damaged in a crash and it let the key kinda jiggle around in the dash. It was pretty annoying. I never use the key ( it's literally just a kill switch- it doesn't turn anything "on") except for pulling the key out in public places, but it was getting on my nerves.
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    I didn't want to just glue it in place, so I made a little bezel to retain the switch against the dash plate. Turned up a ring on the lathe to match the contours of the switch, welded it to a piece of rod, then worked it down with files. I'm pretty pleased with the outcome! I need a long night of quiet shop time. This was just the project to do the trick. No more jiggling :)
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    I have some other projects in the works. A fork brace for this bike ( test ride was VERY good), a cartridge conversion (which may end up being adaptable to nearly ANY fork), and some other odds and ends...but it felt nice making this little piece. It's been a joy just looking at it getting on and off the bike. Nobody will ever know the hours put in to it. The next guy who ends up with this bike probably won't think twice about it. I don't know why that makes me laugh. :D
  11. oic

    oic Business is ALWAYS personal

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  12. dbarale

    dbarale Squiddly slow

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    Thanks for the idea! I have the same issue on my DR350 and that’s a great fix. Off to the garage to look for some scraps of aluminum.
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  13. shinyribs

    shinyribs Thumpers for life

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    That's great :lol3
  14. shinyribs

    shinyribs Thumpers for life

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    Cool! Please post pictures of what you come up with.
  15. shinyribs

    shinyribs Thumpers for life

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    This bike has been giving me fits past couple weeks. Can't really blame the bike, though. Carb'd bikes don't tolerate dirty fuel tanks, and boy was my tank bad. The Kreem liner ( not my fault!) started failing and was releasing itself and lots of rust with it. Between fuel issues and a sticking choke, I didn't have much faith in the bike. The stuck closed choke would just leave you stranded, or having to pull the airbox roadside so unstick it :dirtdog Then the rust started clogging the works. Ride over a rough patch and end up with a plugged pilot jet...again :becca


    I've cleaned a fair few tanks in my time, but never with "perfect" results. Vinegar, electrolysis...noting really seemed to work well. So I did some research and gave it an honest effort this time. After battling flash rust on initial attempts, I now have tank cleaning down to a science. :lol3

    Here's the portions of the liner I was able to pull out. That largest piece is about 12" x 12".
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    An idea of what we were dealing with.
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    I whipped up this little deal to scrub off the majority of the loose stuff. It worked really well! Piece of 1/2" EMT ( electrical conduit) and a 2' length of 5/16" jacketed cable. The jacket keeps the cable from unwinding on you. Just trim off the end of the jacket to fray the cable out. The hook in the EMT lets you steer around inside the tank easily.
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    Even after using the Tank Snake, still had lots of rust and Kreem hanging on to stuff though. But here's the process that worked best for me.
    1- Slosh MEK around inside. Apparently MEK is the full strength version of Acetone. MEK eats Kreem like it's angry at it.
    2- Dump out MEK and give that a quick rinse out with mineral spirits- Just because MEK is so nasty and will melt paint instantly
    3- Slosh around some Muriatic acid. This stuff is brutal, but won't touch paint. It'll eat the rust in a matter of minutes.
    4- Dump out the Muriatic acid an replace with phosporic acid AKA Prep and Etch from Kean strip.
    5- After dumping the Muriatic acid you will get flash rust within moments. Prep and Etchwill remove the flash rust on contact.
    6- Move the tank around ( or completely fill it) with full strength Prep and Etch to keep everything coated.
    7- Dump the Prep and Etch and let air dry
    8- Coat with Marvel Mystery Oil

    *Be sure to neutralize the Muriatic if you are disposing of it. I dumped my acids back in to their containers since they are still effective to be used again*

    Leave the Prep and Etch in place for a few hours. It removes the flahs rust instantly, but it needs time to fully convert it. Let it work or the flash rust will return. After a few hours, drain the Prep and etch and sop up any puddles inside the tank with rags. Doesn't need to be completely dry. You want a film of Prep and Etch as it will create a phosporic layer that actually inhibits rust. After it dries, slosh some Marvel Mystery Oil around inside the tank.

    Like new :clap

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    Petcock bung. This was nearly completed covered in Kreem before. Spotless now!
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    Note the kinda chalky looking line right at the seam line? That's where the phosporic acid did it's magic, converted the rust and left behind a light, gray residue. No flash rust! Coated that with some light oil and left it over night. She's now all back together with a full tank of gas and fresh lines and filter. This will give me a huge confidence boost in this bike's reliability again.

    I didn't take pics once I got my hands in all the chemicals, but I also completely disassembled the fuel cap. It has a multi layer plate system that creates a really clever slosh-proof vent. But it has a small hole that can rust closed easily. Had to derust and treat that as well. So, if you have one, take a look at it.

    Happy trails folks, and keep your fuel tanks clean! :ksteve
    Bt10, scot_douglas, JagLite and 12 others like this.
  16. JensEskildsen

    JensEskildsen Long timer

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    Great job =)
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  17. JimRidesThis

    JimRidesThis Local celebrity

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    Very thorough, it really does look like new inside! Hopefully that should be the end of your fuelling problems :thumb

    Perhaps you should get ‘Tank Snake... the motorcycle restorers flexible friend’ on the market. :D
    todd900ss and shinyribs like this.
  18. Baroquenride

    Baroquenride Everyone dies, but not everyone truly lives.

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    Fantastic job!!! I love homebrew solutions that work this well. :clap
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  19. shinyribs

    shinyribs Thumpers for life

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    I can't take credit for the Tank Snake. A buddy on another forum came up with that many years ago. I'm sure glad he shared the idea, though, because it's a lifesaver!
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  20. shinyribs

    shinyribs Thumpers for life

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    Got a package from @Brtp4 earlier today. Says it fits a Kawi, but that never stopped us before.
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    Activation rod was a touch long, but everything else looked good. Easy job!

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    Bit tough to see, but the slave cylinder is tucked in there. Figured it wouldn't hurt to leave the cable in place for a backup in case something goes kaput. If I travel far from home I'll just toss the stock clutch perch in the toolbag. Doubt I'll ever need it, though. Very reliable little units.
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    Ready to rock! Feels soooo much better than stock. $52 well spent. Thanks again, BP :beer

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