Xplore2Gether - California to Ushuaia

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by JimsBeemer, Mar 6, 2019.

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  1. ADVer

    ADVer Been here awhile

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    Thanks for taking the time to include the additional maps with your route.

    I for one really appreciate mapping detail in a RR. Gives me a better understanding and feel for the route, distances and terrain you are going through.

    Also, saves me from constantly going back and forth between the RR and google maps.

    Enjoying the RR and appreciate the detail you provide in your commentary.
  2. JimsBeemer

    JimsBeemer 2017 R1200GSA Supporter

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    I relate! Before I retired, my morning work-day routine included a cup of coffee while catching up on various ride reports on this forum - and I constantly found myself creating routes on Google Maps so I could "see" where the rider was talking about.
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  3. JimsBeemer

    JimsBeemer 2017 R1200GSA Supporter

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    A gear question! Love it. Spent so much time contemplating gear, I'm happy to talk about it :-)

    Layers - lots of layers. The mesh jackets are so good for the warm climates, and a wind-stopping layer combined with insulating layers, has worked for us when it has been cold. We managed rides in the Andes with temps in the 30's with no issues. We will see how we do here in Patagonia in the winds on Rt 40; temperatures in the mid-40's with these winds is a different thing - wind chill is real! Today, under the jacket, I had the quilted liner that goes with the jacket, and under that a Patagonia down sweater-jacket, and under that my shirt and under that a merino wool base layer. And my torso was warm enough. But one piece of gear I forgot (not sure how) was the wind-stop layer for my mesh pants, and I may be wishing I had them. Today I had on a merino wool base layer in addition to my pants and mesh over-pants, and my legs were still a bit cold - if I had a wind-block layer I think I would be fine. Iron is I do have a wind block layer - back in storage in California! I own a heated jacket (Gerbing) but decided to not bring it. Would have been nice - but not often enough to justify the space.
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  4. Davidprej

    Davidprej Davidprej Supporter

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    Do you have a rain suit to put on over everything? I was thinking that your setup would be good and then don the rain suit...for rain, obviously, but also for that last layer of wind protection when needed.

    I was also thinking of taking my heated jacket as an under layer, (possibly replacing the quilt liner and down sweater-jacket) then to plug in when needed.

    I get really uncomfortable in heat and am looking for a mesh jacket, 4-season solution. Thanks for your feedback. Nothing like hearing from someone who's 'been there, done that'.
  5. Ohio_Danimal

    Ohio_Danimal If I die trying, at least I tried Supporter

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    A huge shout out to Jim, who helped create a Whatsapp discussion group to help me consolidate information and ideas to get me out of a bind I’m in (stuck in Mendoza Argentina with a toasted front rotor...no brakes).
    The group discussion has produced what might soon be a solution and get me back on the road to Ushuaia.
    Mucho gracias mi amigo!
  6. mura-t

    mura-t Adventurer

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    First of all thank you for your great report:clap

    I have a question about F 700 gs.

    Did you have any problems with low octane fuel?

    because there is at least 95 octane premium in the 700 gs manual.
    I think it's not always easy to find premium fuel?
    I am also planning a trip with 700 gs. But to Southeast Asia.
    That's why I'm asking.
    Thanks again!
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  7. JimsBeemer

    JimsBeemer 2017 R1200GSA Supporter

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    This is interesting, and is something I was concerned about at the start. And my R1200GSA has same octane rating recommendation, and back home I always filled it up with premium. But after doing this trip, I will never be able to take seriously one of those threads where people fervently insist that using anything less than <fill in your brand's> highest octane gas is worthy of your BMW.

    I still have an appreciation for "good gas", and I do not doubt the value of good, high octane gasoline. But the fact is ... our bikes just ran without real issues on whatever we put in there, high test, low test, and various types of gasohol popular in some of these countries. And they ran on this variety of fuel with no issues from sea level to over 15,000 feet elevation. I know other riders who where playing with their carburetors and modifying their air-box to deal with the altitude - we just rode. Modern fuel injected engines with adaptive control systems - amazing. I am the opposite of a Luddite when it comes to automotive tech - I love it (when it works :rofl ) .

    The one place we noticed the gas was Peru. After one fill up, (coincidence not initially recognized) I started to notice that my bike (the R1200GSA) was running rough. I stalled a few times in traffic, and seemed to lack a bit of pull when accelerating, and even cut out a few times. I was thinking maybe there was something wrong with my bike, when Carol mentioned she was noticing similar with her F700GS, and then it hit me; we had one thing in common - we both filled up at the same station!

    But even with that tank of bad gas, the bikes still ran, if a bit rough, and with the next fill up normal performance was restored.

    Many of the countries we have been in we find there is a range of octanes offered at the pump, and when it is available we usually (but not always) go for highest offered. But I do wonder, especially in places like Peru or Bolivia, what is really in that high octane pump!

    I have read reports of people having their fuel filter clogged while traveling in South America - and I considered to bring along extra filters, but they are complicated to replace on the road on our bikes, and I decided not to. I think about it from time to time when we pull into a one-pump gas station in some dusty one-horse (or mule, more apropos) town! But knock on wood, we've had no issues - with gas or of any other mechanical sort except for one flat tire (Carol) in Baja at the beginning of our trip, and a recent issue with Carol's aftermarket auxiliary running lights (now fixed).
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  8. JimsBeemer

    JimsBeemer 2017 R1200GSA Supporter

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    Daniel - glad I could play a small part in getting you back on the road! Looks like you will have a replacement rotor soon, from what I see on WhatsApp - Happy trails :-)
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  9. JimsBeemer

    JimsBeemer 2017 R1200GSA Supporter

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    Our plan was to cross the border into Argentina at Chile Chico. Though I would have loved to continue on Ruta 7 all the way to O'Higgins, there are two of us on this trip, and not long after Coihaique, the Carretera Austral turns "all ripio, all the time", more or less, all the way to O'Higgins. And then you have to come back - because it is a "dead end" trip to O'Higgins. There was no way Carol would be happy with that - she'd do it if I asked, but I know it would take a toll on her and I'm happy beyond measure that we've ridden as much of the route as we have, and she's still with me!

    But getting to Chile Chico from Coihaique via Rt 7 involves taking Rt 265 along the southern shores of General Carrera (Lake Buenos Aires if you are Argentinian), a road that is generally described with words such as "bumpy" and "washboard" (which we experienced first hand later - in a minibus). But we learned from someone along the way (honestly forget who told me about this) that you can ride from Coyhaique to Puerto Ingeniero Ibañez, all paved, and then take a ferry across the lake to Chile Chico, bypassing the mostly unpaved long haul around the lake. So that is what we did!

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    Coihaique had plenty of signs of the protests, which we had not seen signs of since Puerto Montt.

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    On the way to Puerto Igeniero Ibañez. Cloudy and it rained a bit - but still beautiful.

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    Rain falling to the right, blue sky to the left. The lake is just ahead - almost to Puerto Ingeniero Ibañez.

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    Our Cabaña in Puerto Ingeniero Ibañez - "Patagonia Bordelago" There are not a lot of options in this tiny town, but this was a reasonable place to stay. Overpriced, but everything in the town was.

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    The ferry coming to fetch us. I commented earlier but bears repeating - the lake has two names, depending on which side of the border you are on (Chile/Argentine border goes through the lake). In Chile it is Lake General Carrera, and in Argentina it is Lake Buenos Aires. It is the second largest lake in South America, after Lake Titicaca.

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    Carol waiting for the ferry - you can get some sense of the wind from her hair and her stance. We had to change how we parked her bike, turning it into the wind, because it was going to blow over.

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    Our bikes, strapped down for the 2 hr ride across the lake. I have been carrying ratchet straps with me since Mexico, where you had to supply your own on the ferry from La Paz (Baja) to Topolobampo (mainland). I thought I'd get to use them here - but they tied them down with their own rigging. One of those things you consider tossing from time to time, but then (if you are like me) you can imagine needing it ...

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    View from the ferry as we pulled out, looking back towards Puerto Ingeniero Ibañez

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    Another view looking back towards Puerto Ingeiero Ibañez. Note the color of the water! That is really how it looked. Now look at the next picture.

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    Further out, the water turned from that milky aqua green to this beautiful blue. No idea what causes the former color on that western end of the lake.
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  10. mura-t

    mura-t Adventurer

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    Thanks your answer helped me a lot.

    I wish you and Carol millions of miles on your bikes.!!
  11. JimsBeemer

    JimsBeemer 2017 R1200GSA Supporter

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    In Cusco I purchased a light weight Northface rain jacket, not to use as riding gear, but because we increasingly were finding ourselves walking about in the rain. But I quickly realized the value of using it when I ride - it adds another "layer" to my layering strategy, and is quite effective. It fits over my mesh jacket, and just having that cut the wind makes a huge difference.

    We both have one-piece rain suits (Rev'it Pacific H20) that we have used for about four years, and they fit over our gear. They work well but since we had been using them for several years, I sealed the seams before we left, not sure it was necessary but no harm. We've had no issues with them (and they have gotten a fair amount of use) but ... if I were to do it again, I would go with a two-piece suit. The one-piece is just hard to get on and off. I think Rev'it makes a two piece version of essentially the same outfit. And I know a lot of people rave about the (less expensive) Frog Togs - I might give those a try.

    The other advantage of a two-piece gets back to your thought: My mesh over-pants came with a liner that is quasi-water proof and acts as a wind break. Somehow, I forgot to bring that! If I had a two-piece rain suit, I think I would be wearing the bottoms to keep my legs a bit warmer. The last two days they have been a bit cold, even with a merino wool base layer and jeans.

    Just as you are considering, my original idea was to bring my Gerbing headed jacket and use it in place of the quilted liner that came with my 3-season mesh jacket (Rev'it Tornado). But the Gerbing jacket is actually pretty thin, and without being plugged in it does not offer a whole lot of warmth. I tried this out during my daily commute in winter, and found that I couldn't cover the lower temperature ranges as well with the Gerbing acting as the liner, compared to the liner that came with the jacket. It just wasn't as all around flexible - that was why in the end I left it. But I would be happy to have the heated jacket at the moment!
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  12. JimsBeemer

    JimsBeemer 2017 R1200GSA Supporter

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    Carol has "Motolite" auxiliary running lights on her F700GS. On the way to Puerto Ingeniero Ibañez, I noted in my rear view mirror that one of them was not lit up. We got to our hotel in Chile Chico early in the day, and I have a spare bulb, so I decided I'd fix her light. Carol and I walked down to the courtyard where the bikes were parked, and took a look at her light; there was clearly signs of water under the lens - not supposed to be that way! After disassembly, I found out why - I'll explain in the pictures.

    But I got to use one of the tools I've brought that some questioned: my soldering iron! I have used it several times on the trip - to repair my electric shaver, and to fix a power cord for Carol's computer. And now her running lights :-) One "oops - I should have thought of that!" thing about my soldering iron: It is made for 120V AC, not 220/240V. And unlike some other appliances, you CANNOT run a 120V soldering iron off of 220V, not for very long anyway! I realized this once we got into Chile, and I picked up a 120V/220V transformer at a Sodimac (like Home Depot) in Santiago, so with that, I could solder away!

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    The damage. The dual-pin type halogen bulb had completely blown up , plating a thin metallic coating on the inside of the lens (not shown). And the water had corroded the receptacle that the pins of the bulb push into - it was toast. The two white wires behind my fingers are supposed to attach to the ceramic receptacle (in my hand). I have a replacement bulb - but the receptacle the bulb goes in is trash - what to do?
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    Who needs a receptacle?! I'll solder the electrical leads directly to the bulb. Tinning the iron.

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    Here I am putting a small amount of solder flux on the pins of the replacement bulb. These are the pins that would have just pushed into the receptacle. Carol is assisting and took the photos.
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    Tining the pins on the bulb.
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    All done - wires soldered to the pins, shrink tubing applied.
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    This was the failure point - this rubber grommet seals around the insulation of the cable that has the two wire leads (wires I soldered to bulb) inside. But the cable had pulled through and just the two thin wires were sticking through the grommet, with lots of room for water to get through.
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    Soldering iron plugged into transformer, transformer plugged into an for the Chilean receptacle. Those are a must have - Chile and Argentina use a couple of different types of AC wall receptacles.
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    Back in business! Only downside is reliability/longevity of the repair. There is a reason solder joints are not used in automotive applications; solder joints are mechanically brittle, and repeated stress (from say, driving on Patagonian dirt roads) can lead to mechanical failure of the joint. But I'm hoping it will last long enough to get us home.
    Note our little REI table doing duty here as a workbench. Love that little table .
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  13. Davidprej

    Davidprej Davidprej Supporter

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    Thanks. Great info. Now to do some experimenting. It hardly gets cold enough down here in S. Louisiana to give my gear a good test.
  14. Davidprej

    Davidprej Davidprej Supporter

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    Kermit chair, REI table, soldering iron! Glad to see that there's one person out there (ok, two) who aren't preaching "travel light". Hey, you have 2 big bikes and extra room, why not bring what you want and makes you comfortable.
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  15. JimsBeemer

    JimsBeemer 2017 R1200GSA Supporter

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    Along the way, many people have told us "You have to see the Marble Caves on Lake General Carrera!" The only problem was that access to the caves is at the town of Puerto Rio Tranquilo, which is about half way between Coihaique and Chile Chico on the dirt road we were trying to avoid. But there are tours operating out of Chile Chico, so we signed up for one and we did it. Here is our take on the caves (we have discussed this and are in agreement on the subject):

    They are nice - really interesting. If you are riding south on Rt 7 through Puerto Rio Tranquilo, you SHOULD go see them. However - they are not "8 hours in a minivan on a really bumpy/washboard dirt road" good. And nearly $50 USD per person for priveledge. Four hours there, 1.5 hours on the lake seeing the caves, then four hours back. They are not that amazing, in our opinion. But we did it, and we have pictures.

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    We spent a good 8 hours in that little van, there and back - bouncing and bumping along. Tried to read - couldn't, got queasy. Forgot to bring music and headphones (big mistake). Only thing I could do that didn't make me motion sick was play solitaire. I played a lot of solitaire!

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    At one of the rest stops the driver made, Carol was interested in this plant and the berry it made. We have no idea what it is other than that the driver got very animated and started a long explanation that included "muerte" and "hospital" several times!
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    Once you get to Puerto Rio Tranquilo, you get on a boat to go to the caves. It was windy and the lake was rough - but I did NOT get sick on this boat ride, thankfully!
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    The boat actually goes into the caves - pretty cool. The entire hillside is marble, and waves have created these caves over the years. There was a tour giuide on our boat, who undoubtedly said a lot more about their formation than that, but it was all in Spanish, and that was about as much as we got out of it. In any case, they are impressive.
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    Close up shot of the marbled erosion pattern on the cave walls.
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    Note the color of the water here - same as on the portion of the lake around Puerto Ingeniero Ibañez. I asked our tour guide, and as I understood, the color here is due not to the water itself, but rather that the water is so clear, that the light hits the bottom and reflects back out, and the color is due mainly to the lake bed, not the water. And something to do with the type of minerals that seep into the lake.
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    On the way back to Chile Chico, the van driver stopped a couple of times to let us out and put our feet on solid ground. He chose locations with good photo ops as welll - he was a good driver. The tour agency we used was "Martin Pescador", office in the bus station in Chile Chico.
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  16. JimsBeemer

    JimsBeemer 2017 R1200GSA Supporter

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    The border crossing at Chile Chico "esta muy tranquil" - one of the easiest we have done. First you do Chile, then after riding for a few km, you come to the Argentinian offices. Both were a piece of cake.

    After reading some stories of people who had problems with their TIP's, a few weeks ago I pulled out our Chilean TIP's and checked them over. I was chagrined to discover that on my TIP, the clerk had put the "entry date" in the "exit date" box and vice versa. I was a little nervous as I've been reading tales of people loosing their bike (one recently on the Panamerican Riders FB page) due to issues with their TIP. But the mistake was so obvious I figured it wouldn't be a problem - and in the end, it wasn't. When I gave the officer my papers, I didn't offer up that I knew there was anything wrong with the document, and I watched his face as he looked at my TIP. He frowned, and ultimately stamped me out, no issues. Whew! I always checked things like the VIN, license and engine numbers - and even the length of stay as determined by exit date. But now I'll be making sure that the "exit date" is in the correct box!

    After finishing the border formalities, we rode into Perito Moreno. Due to the wind forecast from my "Windy" app, we decided to stay two nights in Perito Moreno, and based on the winds we saw that next day, it was a good decision - see the short video Carol made that next day (link below).



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    Checking out from Chile at customs - note the long lines :-)

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    At the Argentinian station - all checked in and ready to go. All in all it was a very simple and quick border crossing. No inspection of our luggage this time on Argentinian entry, unlike our previous two entries.


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    The lake - now Lake Buenos Aires - in the background. It is a large lake - you get more of a sense of that from the Argentinian side.

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    The view headed to Periot Moreno was better out the rear view mirror, with the mountains in the distance (and Carol behind).

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    Based on the wind forecast, we decided to spend an extra day in Perito Moreno. This is a still grabbed from the short vidoe Carol took illustrating the winds that day - we were glad to be in our little cabaña.
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  17. JimsBeemer

    JimsBeemer 2017 R1200GSA Supporter

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    Forgot to add this photo - really cool mural we saw during our walk around Perito Moreno

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  18. JimsBeemer

    JimsBeemer 2017 R1200GSA Supporter

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    We saw a condor, finally! See pictures below for details.

    Going south from Perito Moreno, the next town is Gobernador Gregores, a ride which many riders would knock off in a day, no problem. But we like to keep our rides (time in the saddle) in the three to four hour range, and with the winds we are trying to be off the road by eleven or no later than noon. Trying to fit the ride to Gobernador Gregores into that paradigm just wasn't working. So we found this place on the map - Las Horquetas. It is a hotel and restaurant - all by its lonesome in the middle of Rt 40, about 2.5-3 hours down the road; perfect! We left at 7:30AM and the winds were not so bad - but they did pick up later that day after we checked into the hotel (plus one for the early morning plan!).

    From Los Horquetas we made a very short ride to Gobernador Gregores, where we are now. Google said it would take 2.5 hours - was more like 1.5 hours! So we got into town well before our 11:00 AM target to an AirBnB type of place. We are staying here two nights - I'm writing this on the second day, and boy am I glad we didn't ride today. Winds above 30mph - the entire little house we are in is shaking as I type this. The wind forecast for tomorrow and the next day are much more tranquil, so we should have two good days riding to make it to El Chaltén.

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    Cabañas Teushen, our home for two nights in Perito Moreno. Recommended.
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    On the road from Perito Moreno to Las Horquetas, I stopped to take a photograph, because eagle-eyed Carol, who was in the lead, saw something on the side of the road!
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    She saw a bunch of birds (Caracara) working over this Guanaco carcas, and nearby ...
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    An Andean Condor! We have been looking and looking since Perú to see one of these iconic creatures, and I had just about given up hope! I had to use the zoom lens - he would not let me get very close. There were two - the other one flew of another 100 yards as I got off my bike.

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    Trying to use my camera with my helmet on, I can not get my eye up to the view finder fully to really see what is going on with the shot - and so I didn't notice that the auto-focus had zeroed in on the fence, not the Condor!

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    What is ths a photo of? Carol? Yes. A lonely, windy road? Yes. But the key thing here is the Guanaco you might have missed, to the right. These animals are so incredibly well camouflaged in this environment, they are nearly invisible. And they are everywhere - so you really have to keep your eyes open. Carol is better at spotting them than I am, so I was happy to have her in the lead. Many times she'll say over the comm; "Guanaco on the right" - and I say "Where?" She says "On the right, by the fence!" And I look and look - and never see a thing.

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    There are at least a half dozen Guanaco in this picture. And it is that hard to see them in real life - it isn't just a photo thing.

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    No Guanaco (well - could be) - just scenery. This is before Las Horquetas.

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    The road was pretty lonely - we did pass this guy. It starting to get pretty windy, and he was on a smaller bike and was hunkered down going about 45 mph.

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    And we met some riders headed the other way.

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    There was this one herd of Guanaco right by the road and I stopped and took some pics with the "real" camera using the zoom.

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    The one on the right was having quite a time rolling in the dirt.

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    Los Horquetas - as we are about to leave the next morning, for our short ride to Gobernador Gregores.

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    The sign is hardly needed! But that is truth in advertising, for sure.
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  19. JimsBeemer

    JimsBeemer 2017 R1200GSA Supporter

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    South of Mendoza, there is only one unpaved section of Rt 40, and it is between Gobernador Gregores and Tres Lagos. And it isn't an nice stretch of road - I've read a lot of ride reports that mention this section, and in the past month have talked to a lot of riders who have ridden it this year. The consistent picture is of a nasty bit of road with way to much gravel, and deep (8" I was told) wheel ruts that you dare not venture out of, but the wind will do it's best to push you out of. Many people go down at least once on this section. Glen Hamburger, a rider we met in Peru, told me of a rider that recently went down when he got pushed out of the rut, and he broke his ankle. Just the other day, we met some riders at the restaurant in Los Horquetas - a group of about six Canadians, all on serious adventure bikes - they had just come through this section of road the day before. Their descriptions were "Worst road I've ridden this trip" and describing it thus; "There is a track a tire width's wide in a trench with deep gravel on either side and it takes all your concentration to stay in your track, then the wind pushes you out". Consistent with what I've read and heard from others.

    It is a road we'd do if we had to - but ... there is another way. There is an all-paved detour that bypasses this unpaved stretch - I first read about this in the blog post from a 4-wheel over-lander (and even on four wheels, they were recommending the detour).

    The detour adds 51 miles to the trip from Gobernador Gregores to Tres Lagos, but after much consideration (I've been thinking about this stretch of road since before we started!), and despite Carol's "I can do it!" assurance - I've decided we have nothing to prove, and a lot to loose if we have an accident, so we are taking the "long way around" (sounds like a reality TV show - Charley and Ewan, watch out!). We have been on plenty of bad roads, and there are more to come, but this one we can avoid, so we will. Below are my notes I sent to another rider.

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    The paved detour is Rt 27 to 288 back to Tres Lagos. It is 51 miles further than going "directly" from GG to Tres Lagos on 40.

    FWIW - All the maps show Rt 40 bypassing Gobernador Gregores, continuing SW at the juncture of Rt 25. But after recent paving, the "real" Rt 40 follows 25 into Gobernador Gregores, and then connects back up with the old Rt 40 ("Ex Ruta 40") on what was Rt 29 (and I presume is now shared 40/29). This route (25 to GG then 29 back to old 40) is the "official" Rt 40 route, and is paved, I have it highlighted in yellow.

    Old 40 from the 40/25 junction to Tres Lagos is unpaved except for a short section in the middle, where the new 40/29 connects up (red and gold colors are paved, green is unpaved). The "bad" section of ripio is after this point - 70km long, as noted in the map. And not all 70km of that is bad - from what the riders told me it is a short 5km or so section. But of that section - a Brazilian rider I met at the gas station in GG said "You will ride on a pretty good road - then you will come to it. And after a while you will want to quit and turn around - but if you keep going it gets better"

    G0028225.JPG
    I grabbed this photo with my GoPro as we went by - this is the junction of 40 with "Ex Ruta 40" (Old Route 40). Carol, ahead, is now on 40/25 headed into Gobernador Gregores. A right turn at this interchange puts you on old 40, which turns gravel immediately after the interchange. If you are going to take old 40 (I know lots of riders who would consider our way boring!) think about gas - it was 220 miles on my trip meter from the gas station in Perito Moreno to the YPF station in Gobernador Gregores, and there is no listed (on Google Maps) gas from here until Tres Lagos (I heard there may be some available in between, but not reliably) So a short side trip into Gobernador Gregores might be worth your while, to gas up.
    jowul, 95Monster, MrMac and 3 others like this.
  20. JimsBeemer

    JimsBeemer 2017 R1200GSA Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2014
    Oddometer:
    709
    Location:
    San Jose, CA
    We did it (detour) and are now in Tres Lagos, with really horrible internet. I'll post more later with some photos (we saw some Rhea - first time!). But turns out maps are not always correct! The first leg of the trip, on 27, was totally paved. However, shortly after getting on 288, it was unpaved - but ... it was a great road; wide and surface was hard pack ripio, no deep gravel at all.

    But it was not as smooth sailing as I had hoped. We left early with almost no winds, and were doing 70-75 mph on 27, but once 288 turned ripio we dropped down to 35-40 mph for most of the way, slower in a few parts. But I know many would have gone 50 mph on much of this - we just aren't that guy! But it was a long haul - about 70 miles on the unpaved section of 288.

    Was it worth it? I can't say for sure because we didn't experience the section of Rt 40 we bypassed firsthand for comparison. But I can say that during the entire ripio section on 288, not once did either of us feel like we might go down - it was just slower going than we had hoped. The jarring of the not-as-smooth-as-asphalt road was a bit hard on Carol's vertigo-prone eyes towards the end.

    When I compare our experience to the 2nd hand experiences I've collected on the alternative, I'm pretty happy with our choice.

    For a fun, very humorous read - here is another rider's description of Rt 40 from Gobernador Gregores to Tres Largos - it will make you laugh.

    http://www.2ridetheglobe.com/tag/rtw/page/3/