XR200R Pit Bike Project

Discussion in 'Some Assembly Required' started by JagLite, Jan 2, 2017.

  1. JagLite

    JagLite Long timer Supporter

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    NC Rick (Cogent Dynamics) sent me pictures of the shock he built for my little Honda (It ain't a big motorcycle, just a groovy little motorbike :strum )

    Working out on the dyno:

    :lift

    [​IMG]

    And posing for a beauty shot:

    :sweeti


    [​IMG]

    :thumb
    #61
  2. Salsa

    Salsa Long timer

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    What does it say after BAD on the end?

    Don
    #62
  3. JagLite

    JagLite Long timer Supporter

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    Good eyes!
    Bad Threads
    Rick installed a Helicoil in it for me.
    (it made the price lower) :thumb
    #63
  4. JagLite

    JagLite Long timer Supporter

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    Well, this is unfortunate, and embarrassing. :(

    My nice new shock arrived! :wings

    [​IMG]

    So I quickly bolted it in place...

    [​IMG]

    Only to discover it is too long :yikes


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Even with the swingarm at full extension and the links locked it is still too long to bolt in. :becca

    I read through our emails and messages and discovered the problem, too many variables and possibilities were discussed and when it came down to the final dimensions, I was thinking inches, but Rick was working with millimeters. Which is fine IF I had converted the metric to imperial and made sure the numbers were correct. But, I didn't so it ended up being 1.5" too long. :pep

    My fault of course but Rick said send it back and he will fix it.

    I must double, triple, and quadruple check everything I do, and I can still get things wrong all to often.
    I can measure twice, measure twice again, measure a third time and writing down the numbers each time, then cut once. On the wrong end of the board or wrong side of the line, or upside down/backwards... Argh! :baldy

    So, after making a botch at that, I moved on to rebuilding the seat.

    I removed the old blue cover and found that the seat had been rebuilt before because the sides of the foam in places were rotted away from sun damage and part of the seat foam had been cut out and replaced.
    I may just get new foam and do a cut and shape but I decided to have fun with the existing foam and try an experiment.

    I cut the foam about in half by height with an electric carving knife:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Then I cut one of my floor mats in pieces to build the seat up 2" higher, and to make it flatter:

    [​IMG]

    I decided to add to my experiment by creating a tailbone gap, to put my weight on my butt bones instead of my tailbone:

    [​IMG]

    Stacked like a layer cake to see how it feels:

    [​IMG]

    A bit of sanding to level the top and layers to get away from the rounded top surface to a flat top:

    [​IMG]

    Installed on the bike for a test sit:

    [​IMG]

    Not too bad :hmmmmmif you keep your eyes closed that is.

    OK, time to glue it back together with waterborne contact cement:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Another test sit after glued together:

    [​IMG]

    Hoooeeee that's UGLY!

    :eek2

    And after the final shaping:

    [​IMG]

    Will it work?
    Will I like it?
    Will I burn it?

    Stay tuned as my wife sews the cover for it.... (soon she says...:dunno)

    Meanwhile, I started making the rear axle spacers:

    [​IMG]

    I sanded and repainted the rear fender that got so much junk in the paint last time:

    [​IMG]

    Much better. :thumb

    And that's now up to date with this project. :wave
    #64
  5. JagLite

    JagLite Long timer Supporter

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    I started work on the muffler tonight by taking a Ducatti muffler apart, cutting a section out of it to make it shorter, and welding the core back together.

    Proof:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Inner core cut and the end piece welded back in place:

    [​IMG]

    Outer shell cut to length:

    [​IMG]

    Why you ask? :loco
    Why not just buy a muffler? :scratch
    I say "what's the fun in that?" :D

    This muffler was on hand, it is stainless steel, has a baffle chamber and straight through design, and other than being too long should fit fine.
    I fixed the too long part... :lift

    Next is to weld up a midpipe to join the muffler to the header pipe with a reducer pipe and bends.

    On other parts of the project, my wife has cut out and pinned together the pattern for the seat cover so it is getting closer.
    And Rick at Cogent Dynamics built my shock today so it will be arriving next week.

    Slow progress on the pitbike since i would rather ride than play in the shop when the weather is nice.
    #65
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  6. JagLite

    JagLite Long timer Supporter

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    A rainy day today so I spent the time playing in the shop on two project bikes.

    I cut up a head pipe I had in my parts stash since it was the right size to match up with the XR's Only head pipe and uses a collar gasket.

    It is the blueish U-bend pipe in the middle of this picture:

    [​IMG]

    I picked up an exhaust pipe reducer at an auto parts store that is in the picture above too.

    I cut the headpipe into sections and tacked it together to see how it fit:

    [​IMG]

    Just like I had hoped.

    Then I tacked the reducer on and after another fit-up I welded it all up:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Yes, I used a mix of stainless steel and mild steel to build the exhaust.
    I will be painting the midpipe black anyway.
    (I only have gas for steel, welding ss takes a tri-mix... or is it pure argon? I forget)
    I would also have to switch wire to ss, and I would have to order the reducer in ss.
    Not ideal to mix them but it is good enough for me. :thumb

    Next will be an aluminum strap hanger to replace the wire that is holding the muffler up in the pictures and high temp paint.
    #66
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  7. Salsa

    Salsa Long timer

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    No wonder you Alaska guys get a lot done -- there are a lot of rainy days in Alaska !!

    Don
    #67
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  8. JagLite

    JagLite Long timer Supporter

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    My new shock from Cogent Dynamics arrived and bolted right in. :clap

    [​IMG]

    I checked the sag and bounced on it to see how it feels.
    It feels great! :rayof

    Soft, like the stock RM85 USD forks with my weight on it.
    Since this is a low speed trail bike I want it to be on the soft side.
    If I am able to bottom the suspension constantly I will go stiffer but it feels correct so far.
    #68
  9. dbarale

    dbarale Squiddly slow

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    Any updates? I love this build...
    #69
  10. JagLite

    JagLite Long timer Supporter

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    Thanks! :beer
    Unfortunately I have been out of commission for a long time with a staff infection in my knee joint. :pep
    Way too much pain to do anything including hobbling around on my crutches. :becca

    But Saturday afternoon I was finally able to dink around in the shop for an hour so I installed the hand guards and finished the muffler. :thumb
    I thought the muffler shell was SS but it turns out it is Ti.
    Titanium is difficult to machine I found out after breaking three drill bits trying to drill the holes for the end caps rivets.
    I learned that Ti needs to be drilled slowly with heavy pressure and lots of lubrication.

    I hoped to make the aluminum mounting strap for the muffler but ran out of energy too soon.

    My wife hasn't sewn the seat cover yet but she promises to get around to it... soon. :fpalm
    I may have to tell her that I will sew it and she can just tell me how to use her expensive sewing machine. :yikes
    That will motivate her to finish it! "Keep away from my sewing machine!" :dirtdog
    #70
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  11. JagLite

    JagLite Long timer Supporter

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    Robyn sewed together the seat cover for my "tall" seat Saturday, the day after the one I ordered from Hi-Flite for the stock seat arrived so I installed both covers:

    Stock seat with Hi-Flite cover:
    IMG_9125.JPG
    With tall seat on the table.



    Tall seat:

    IMG_9127.JPG

    Unfortunately, the plastic cover over the foam on the stock seat wrinkled so even though the vinyl seat cover is smooth, the plastic foam protector shows wrinkles.
    I may pull the staples on one side and tear the plastic out... or I may just ignore it since the tall seat will probably be the one I use when riding. :hmmmmm

    I don't think I posted a picture of the muffler mount:

    IMG_9078.JPG

    Slow progress due to health problems so I won't be riding it this summer... bummer... :dirtdog :becca :snore
    #71
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  12. dsilver1007

    dsilver1007 Long timer

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    Just found out about the build and I love this build. Thank you for posting the thread!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    #72
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  13. sparkingdogg

    sparkingdogg Prisoner In Disguise

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    @JagLite did you ever get it done? It's a neat build!
    #73
  14. JagLite

    JagLite Long timer Supporter

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    Thanks sparky, not done yet.

    I ride every chance I get during the summer and work on my projects over the long, cold, and dark winters.
    It snowed today, the first time for this winter, so I am winterizing my bikes and will be starting back on my projects.

    All I have left on the Pit Bike is the rear brake caliper mount and a spacer for the sprocket to align with the engine sprocket.
    Then it will be ready to rock and roll. :ricky

    The V-Strom will be the big project push this winter with lots of fabrication to design and build.
    New under seat fuel tank, seat, airbox cover, racks, exhaust system, engine guard/skid plate armor and a few odds and ends.
    I will start a build thread on it after I get most of the work done. :thumb
    #74
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  15. Andyvh1959

    Andyvh1959 Cheesehead Klompen Supporter

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    Da frozen tundra eh? 1.5 mile west of Lambeau
    Interesting build! I have done a couple motorcycle and a snowmobile seat mod, and used expanding spray foam (the insulator stuff, Great Stuff or better yet the new one from 3M) to fill in the gaps in the layers of the seat foam build up. On my 97 Arctic Cat snowmobile I used that method to "foam form" an extension on the front of the seat to extend over the fuel tank. I built the seat up 4", and used the spray foam to build in the section to form fit to the gas tank.
    #75
  16. JagLite

    JagLite Long timer Supporter

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    That's interesting, I wouldn't have thought the spray foam would hold up under regular use.
    The stuff I have used (Great Stuff I think) hardens up brittle after expanding and I then carved/shaped/sanded it to what I wanted to use it for.
    But I haven't tried to see if it would work as seat filler.
    It works, eh?
    #76
  17. Andyvh1959

    Andyvh1959 Cheesehead Klompen Supporter

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    Da frozen tundra eh? 1.5 mile west of Lambeau
    Well, on my 94 BMW R1100RS I used it to fill gaps in my seat design, done back in 2012, and since then the cover doesn't show anything going on underneath that I think the spray foam would have caused. Since that time, 3M makes a spray foam product that is supposed to set much more dense and consistent, and also more flexible. So I would use the 3M product for any seat mods I do going forward.

    Since I designed/built up my own foam design on the seat for my BMW R1100RS I have parked my butt on the seat for at least 25,000 miles with no changes.
    #77
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  18. JagLite

    JagLite Long timer Supporter

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    Excellent!
    Thanks for the recommendation :thumb
    #78
  19. Andyvh1959

    Andyvh1959 Cheesehead Klompen Supporter

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    One thing I did after finishing the foam shaping and before the cover went on, I covered the foam by glueing on a 1/8" thin carpet like sheet material to smooth out the transitions. That gave me a smooth surface on which the local professional upholstery shop could apply the cover. I didn't want imperfections in the foam to show through the cover. Since the underlayment was fully glued to the foam it also acts to support the foam and firm it up a bit. In a way, kind of a "tension skin" over the foam so the vinyl cover didn't take all the load. Its proved to be very durable, no wrinkles, no folds, no seam issues, no displaced foam under the cover in over 25,000 riding miles.
    #79
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  20. JagLite

    JagLite Long timer Supporter

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    That's a great way to keep the various layers and types of foam together and covered.
    I tried using the heavy duty plastic sheet over the foam to hold it tight but it is the plastic that wrinkled up under the cover.
    Not bad, but obvious to me so I don't like that.
    But, now reading how you did yours I realize my mistake was putting the plastic and cover on at the same time.
    I should have put the plastic on and secured it with contact cement or something before installing the cover.
    I am planning to pull the staples and redo the cover so that I am happy with it.
    #80