Xt250 or ttr250 for the rotund rider

Discussion in 'Australia' started by Steiglitz, Aug 29, 2021.

  1. Steiglitz

    Steiglitz Adventurer

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    So, a crf250 rally has come up, low kms but dearer than the ttr or xt. How do they rate against the other 2? Additional $2000 better?
    #41
  2. tripodtiger

    tripodtiger Off riding around on bitumen circles.

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    I've never ridden one, can't help with that side of it.
    A whole lot newer than a TTR. Parts should be easier to get.
    #42
  3. GodSilla

    GodSilla I did that.

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    A good mate has one for tar transports and dirt roads and loves it. Not really meant for fire trails.
    The standard suspension is marshmallows, comfy as but not for anything challenging.
    If it falls over there is a lot of plastic. The plastic however aids in comfort from weather protection.
    Tall seat from memory. Good power for a 250, very good on fuel.
    #43
  4. Chuck Thrillseeker

    Chuck Thrillseeker I'll Do It Tomorrow I'm Busy Today

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    I'm the mate :super haha and it hardly hits any tar Gods, just to get to the dirt! My Boulevard takes care of the tar:D

    For me at just under 5'10" its a little to tall! I'm tippy toes when stopped and on sloping edges, its a pain! This is the only time i notice the 150kg weight as well, as once under way it is a beautiful bike to ride! I am about to fit a lowering link to sole this problem!

    The suspension is soft but so am I, so happy with the way the stock shocks work! At 65 and health issues, these days i just ride dirt tracks /gravel roads and occasionally a ride with my son! I have a video of this which shows the bike on a variety of surfaces! Also another video when i went for a ride the other day..

    As for the plastics i had a pretty speccy crash once on the dirt trail i'm riding in the vid and the plastics came out with just a few scratches! Which reminds me i need to edit that footage up as i had my gopro running haha

    ....
    #44
  5. Chuck Thrillseeker

    Chuck Thrillseeker I'll Do It Tomorrow I'm Busy Today

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    the other video...

    ....
    #45
  6. Steiglitz

    Steiglitz Adventurer

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    Looks like a lot of fun. South Aust?
    #46
  7. Steiglitz

    Steiglitz Adventurer

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    Well I managed to get to inspect a xt250, quick little test ride, fun but felt smaller than I thought it would be. So at least I know now, so can scratch that off my list. Hunt continues....
    #47
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  8. Steiglitz

    Steiglitz Adventurer

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    Hoping to check out a crf250 rally, ttr250, drz400 and dr650 this week. I'm assuming by specs, the crf will be the lowest powered, but how do the ttr vs drz400 go in a no hold em, good ol fashioned contest as a lightweight adventure bike?
    Cheers
    #48
  9. tripodtiger

    tripodtiger Off riding around on bitumen circles.

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    Trokel and I had a ride to Mt Hope and back. I reckon my modified seat was probably more comfortable than his stock one. The 400 was clearly quicker to accelerate and could cruise at a bit higher speed. We still rode together so it was pretty irrelevant. Subject to gearing as well. We had bitumen from Hillston to Mt Hope and they both sat at a reasonable speed, bearing in mind that they are relatively small and both Trokel and I are relatively large.

    I'd say either is a reasonable option. Chose based on condition / price. Again, the TTR is discontinued but you could still find a new DRz. Not that the Yamaha has any problems with parts supply.
    #49
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  10. Hoots

    Hoots Long timer

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    The DRZ has a far stronger motor - once derestricted that motor really is a gem - very torquey and tractable

    The TTR has a way better gearbox - better spread of gears (the DRZ has a narrow gearbox) so possibly more rideable across a range of applications

    Both bikes have a strong following as trailies and as ADV bikes - and both are bombproof - there are more DRZs around, and more accessories / aftermarket parts etc - as an example of the versatility of the DRZ, check out the latest vid series from MAD TV - that was 7000km across northern Aus, and whilst showcasing the Husky 701s the trip was actually led by a crew on DRZs - huge kms / all terrain / total reliability
    #50
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  11. Steiglitz

    Steiglitz Adventurer

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    Thanks Tripod and Hoots. Are either of them, actually include all four, better on the tarmac ? One of the reasons for all the questions , and maybe it should be a seperate thread, is that I have riders with years more experience, mainly on road, claiming that I'll regret a smaller cc purchase and will outgrow quickly. Whereas, I'm 51, rotund with only 2000 kms experience, but have learnt straightaway that my riding will include a lot of gravel tracks. Reason I mention my age is, I have no idea how quickly my skills will improve to outgrow bikes. 51 isn't over the hill but I am aware that my reactions are not as quick, as a self employed person, bones may take longer to heal, currently my riding is solo etc. So all the questions. I should have added newbie to the title as well
    Cheers everyone
    #51
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  12. Hoots

    Hoots Long timer

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    You have to gear the DRZ up a bit to ride it on the road - the motor is strong enough to do this - plenty of people ride them (and TTRs) long distances

    Check out the Tropical Punch series (part 3 below) - 7000km is a long way ... then check out the Cape York trip by the same bloke (also below) - shows how versatile the DRZ is

    If you want to improve offroad skills, then definitely don't go any bigger than a DRZ / TTR - bigger bikes can go places, but pretty much everyone who does that has learned on a small bike

    It's not just about ease, but small bikes crash a lot better - and they're far more fun offroad - and you also have to be very careful solo with anything over about 150kg, that you're not getting into something you can't get out of

    I'd definitely go with a smaller bike - you may not keep it forever, but you'll get a lot of enjoyment and learn a lot

    And really, 51 isn't old by any means



    #52
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  13. GodSilla

    GodSilla I did that.

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    As an older bloke coming to riding, I recommend looking to a lightweight bike.
    Bigger might be faster but it is also usually heavier too, more mass to pull up in an emergency.
    Ultimately weight is your enemy on dirt.
    The TTR weighs a respectable 119kgs with fuel.
    #53
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  14. Steiglitz

    Steiglitz Adventurer

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    Are Ttr parts easy to come by in Aust? I know there's a guy in the UK with an online store, but don't want to have to rely on him only and have the bike stuck at the mechanics if needed
    #54
  15. GodSilla

    GodSilla I did that.

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    I never had a problem with parts, but I didn't wear anything out either apart from tyres.
    Regular oil changes, easy as piss, 1.1 litres of Delo 400 every 2 or 3 tanks, nuthin' wears out inside. Costs all of $6 a time.
    #55
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  16. Chuck Thrillseeker

    Chuck Thrillseeker I'll Do It Tomorrow I'm Busy Today

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    #56
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  17. tripodtiger

    tripodtiger Off riding around on bitumen circles.

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    I rebuilt my TTR from a farm wreck, that has sat in a paddock for 7 years. Parts are very easy to get. The only thing I didn't do myself was the piston/rings replacement and setting up the head. I am 'The Muckanic'. If I can do it, anyone can.
    Yamaha are really good for parts. I've got a '73 RD250 and an '80 XS11, amongst other things. No drama getting most of the genuine parts.
    TotallyTTRs - the site I expect you are aware of - is as good as any I've dealt with.

    I have to agree with 'silla & Hoots. I've been riding 40+ years. Solos, sidecars. Mostly on road and gravel roads. I was a rider trainer and I'm doing historic road racing. I do have a bit of experience but I have a reputation for getting in over my head. And falling down.

    Long story short, I bought a KTM 950 Adventure. Great bike, loved it to bits. But scary fast. Way better than me. Way faster than me. I fell of it often. I realised it was encouraging me to go places where I shouldn't go.
    Next was a KTM690E. Great bike, loved it to bits. The ignition map could be altered from 'DR' to 'woo hoo' to 'holy shit'. The rest of this paragraph is a repeat of the former one.

    Over the years I've had DR650, KLR650, BMW R100GS, Triumph Tiger 900 & Tiger 955, plus the two Katos and the various road bikes.

    I'm finding the TTR a hoot. It is encouraging me to ride it to places where I would be concerned about on anything else I've ridden. It's allowing me to practice the off road skills that I am aware of, that I found really difficult to do on anything I've had before. Because of the limited sealed road speed, I am actively looking for gravel roads etc before I leave home. It doesn't work perfectly because lots of tracks marked on maps either aren't there or a private land.

    Returning to maintenance, mine has over 50k on it. It's rattling a bit. I'm going to change the cam chain & cam sprockets, plus the guides, as soon as I get another bike running on the road. It's possibly a keeper but we'll have to see.

    There are bits of my brain that wish I had started 40+ years ago on a trail bike. I may be a much better rider than I am.
    #57
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  18. GodSilla

    GodSilla I did that.

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    I notice reference to riding with others on probably larger machines.

    My TTR was geared to pull 110 flat, it would get to 105 OK but struggle to pull that last 5kph. But.....
    It was geared just perfect for dirt. I cruised on tarseal at 70 to 90kph very comfortably, only speeding up as cars approached from behind to ease their frustrations until I could let them past. I dunno I'd have taken it on group rides with roadies much, but I rode it from Bega to Sydney and back, 1000k's on tar, just 'cos I could.
    If you are a bigger\wider bloke a TTR will struggle to drag you at speed mostly due to the aero drag vs horsepower equation, it's just straight physics.
    #58
  19. tripodtiger

    tripodtiger Off riding around on bitumen circles.

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    You skinny mini, you!

    100% agree though.
    If you ride, often, with blokes/blokettes on bigger bikes you will find you get left behind. Until you're on a winding gravel road and they find their chicken strips.
    #59
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  20. Steiglitz

    Steiglitz Adventurer

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    I'm about as aerodynamic as the proverbial outhouse with a head large enough to have its own postcode and gravitational pull
    #60
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