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Yamaha Riva 180 issues...big surprise

Discussion in 'Battle Scooters' started by Scooter dude, Apr 8, 2019.

  1. Scooter dude

    Scooter dude Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2019
    Oddometer:
    10
    Location:
    USA
    Has anyone rebuilt the rear clutch?

    I’m going to try to replace the friction plates, pressure plate and main compression spring in the clutch. Parts were ordered today. Removing it shouldn’t be the problem but breaking into it to replace the worn parts might be challenging. Any tips?

    I’m also having cold starting issues again
    Carb was removed and cleaned, no help. The auto choke (BCV) was bypassed, no help.
    Has anyone found a replacement carb for this scoot? This thing is way over-engineered.
    Any tips?
    #1
  2. pmillar

    pmillar Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2008
    Oddometer:
    83
    Location:
    SE Michigan
    This probably isn't applicable, but on the CH80 (Elite) I picked up last summer, I just replaced the auto choke for pretty cheap and it's started fine since then. No idea on the clutch aside from recommending JIS screwdrivers/bits rather than phillips if you have many to remove (doubtful).
    #2
  3. baloneyskin daddy

    baloneyskin daddy bikaholic Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2009
    Oddometer:
    3,960
    Location:
    southcentral PA.
    Just how was the auto choke bypassed? You just can't remove it and plug the hole.They need a choke to start when cold.
    #3
  4. Wentwest

    Wentwest How's that work?

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,664
    Location:
    Northern California
    Honda scooter? If the old bystarter doesn't work at all you can take it apart and use the brass needle and the brass piece that the needle is part of, drop it into the hole where the bystarter was and then fill the hole with something that will keep it in there and stop air leaking past it. You can use the old clip and screws to hold down a cap. I live in the San Francisco Bay Area and the scooter started OK at temps at 40 or higher. Below that I just don't know. It was cold hearted, started but I had to let it run for a minute or 2, then it was fine.

    If it's a Yamaha it's trickier. I had to take the bystarter and the housing that attaches it to the carb off the carb and jam a piece of hard rubber stuff in so the two jet gizmo was always pressed into the carb when I put the cover on again. It starts with just the slightest tiny bit of throttle, but I have to start it before I put on the jacket, helmet and gloves so it will warm up some. Otherwise, when you open the throttle it just dies.
    #4
  5. baloneyskin daddy

    baloneyskin daddy bikaholic Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2009
    Oddometer:
    3,960
    Location:
    southcentral PA.
    I took the bystarter apart on my Aero 125 and attached a small cable to the brass plunger and made a manual choke out of it. I ran the cable thru the plastic side cover right below the seat latch and can pull it while cranking it over when cold. It been working like a charm for 2 yrs now.
    #5
  6. fullmetalscooter

    fullmetalscooter Let me take this duck off

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2009
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    4,981
    Location:
    BC
  7. Scooter dude

    Scooter dude Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2019
    Oddometer:
    10
    Location:
    USA
    #7
  8. Scooter dude

    Scooter dude Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2019
    Oddometer:
    10
    Location:
    USA
    I have it mostly apart. Bought new pressure plates and clutch plates from eBay.

    Problem is I can’t seem to get the ring nut off so I can replace the main compression spring and check the condition of the two bearings. I’m pretty sure they’re bad. I can spin them with my finger and they feel notchy, not turning smoothly. Pretty frustrating.

    Attached Files:

    #8
  9. fullmetalscooter

    fullmetalscooter Let me take this duck off

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2009
    Oddometer:
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    3 chooses . Take it to your local Yamaha shop with six pack of donuts and ask them to take it off. They may have the tool . 2) Is the nut still able to be bought or not ? If so buy one and like some people do use a cold chisel carefully with a small hammer and to start it turning . Hit the notch going around and around till it turns. Might work and I ve done it to a honda goldwing clutch nut. 2) This one is more doable for anyone but it going to take a couple hours and time to make a tool that fits the nut . Can you find socket that is the same size as the nut ? Pawn shops are great place to find them. use Dermal tool and file . Measure and make a paper template . Cut and file the socket so there two notches that fit the nut. Four is better . Use a peace of pipe and do the same thing . Drill through the end and use another peace of pipe to act as leaver . Push down and turn. 4th option is go to auto parts store , Hourbor freight tools etc and see if there is someone like that for auto . If you know of a real old type garage thats being fixing autos for 30 years plus he should be able to find something
    #9
  10. fullmetalscooter

    fullmetalscooter Let me take this duck off

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2009
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    Location:
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    #10
  11. Scooter dude

    Scooter dude Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2019
    Oddometer:
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    USA

    I made a tool from an old burned up door knob bit. It fits pretty well. Still can’t budge it. Impact drill, nope...pry bar...nope.

    Attached Files:

    #11
  12. Moat

    Moat Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2005
    Oddometer:
    452
    Location:
    Mid-mitten
    Generously heat the ring nut with a propane torch and (promptly) whack the castle slot(s) with a big drift punch and hammer. It looks clean and corrosion-free, so seemingly shouldn't be giving you quite that much trouble. You sure it's not a reverse thread? Looks kinda' like it could be, in the 3rd pic directly above...

    Bob
    #12
  13. MarylandStrom

    MarylandStrom Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,224
    Location:
    Beltsville, Maryland
    I vote for taking it to the dealer and beg (slip a few dollars) them to take it off.

    Here is a manual: http://www.motorscooterguide.net/Manuals/Yamaha_XC180_Service_Manual.pdf

    It appears the tool you need can be found on page 1-28. I did a quick search and a lot of places say it is no longer in stock.

    You could probably make a tool from an old socket if needed. Grind the edge down everywhere except for the pins that go in the slots. I would probably opt for a heavier duty air ratchet socket. The black ones. Not the regular chrome sockets.
    #13
  14. Wentwest

    Wentwest How's that work?

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,664
    Location:
    Northern California
    I had a thing like that once and I soaked it with penetrating oil every day for 3 or 4, then heated it up hot as hell and put the impact tool on it and just ran it for 10 or 15 seconds and it came off. It's torture to hear that impact just banging away. I don't know this clutch, but is there any spring pressure pushing the plate against that nut? compressing it with a bunch of c-clamps would help if there is.
    #14
  15. sparkingdogg

    sparkingdogg Prisoner In Disguise

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2014
    Oddometer:
    7,758
    Location:
    Omahell, Nebraska
    Heat with a pin point torch tip and propane or better yet Mapp gas. Get it pretty hot. Get the proper fitting spanner socket, a good 1/2 inch impact gun with around 750 ft/pd of power, and a good air supply. It will come off. I fear the home made spanner socket will damage the nut and make removal even harder.

    I have used a big hammer and sharp chisel once or twice, but really the proper spanner and air impact gun are the best (and maybe only) way to go.

    Good luck!
    #15
  16. Scooter dude

    Scooter dude Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2019
    Oddometer:
    10
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    USA
    Well, now I have bigger problems.

    There was no way I was getting that ring nut off. Couldn’t heat it because there is a rubber gasket just below it and it would melt in the process.

    I gave up on replacing the main spring and just replaced the clutch and pressure plates. Put it all back together and bolted it back on the scooter.

    Now for the real problem...

    The CVT no longer works. The transmission is directly connected to the motor now. The drive belt is fixed in position regardless of engine rpm and no longer rides in/out on the fwd or aft pulleys. It sits about mid way in both fwd and rear pulleys and doesn’t move. If I take the bike off the center stand with the engine running, it lerches forward and the engine immediately dies when the rear tire hits the ground.

    I’m about ready to give up on the old girl.
    #16
  17. baloneyskin daddy

    baloneyskin daddy bikaholic Super Supporter

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    Oct 21, 2009
    Oddometer:
    3,960
    Location:
    southcentral PA.
    The rollers fell out of place in the fr variator while you had the belt off.
    #17
  18. Scooter dude

    Scooter dude Adventurer

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    Apr 8, 2019
    Oddometer:
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    USA
    Is that what happened?

    Dude if you’re right, I friggin’ love you
    #18
  19. Wentwest

    Wentwest How's that work?

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,664
    Location:
    Northern California
    Yup, that's what happened, put it together right and hold the moveable plate tight into the variator as you slide the whole deal onto the crankshart, slide it all the way on, then let go and don't let it slide back off. Loop the belt around the shaft, put on the outer half of the variator pulley and tighten the nut with your fingers, then keep the belt spread open as much as you can as you continue to tighten the nut with your fingers. When the outer plate is fully seated use a torque wrench and tighten the nut to spec. At start the belt should be near the center, by the shaft on the variator end, and out at the rim more or less at the rear end.
    #19
  20. Scooter dude

    Scooter dude Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2019
    Oddometer:
    10
    Location:
    USA

    That did it. Thanks again. Much appreciated.
    #20