Yamaha T7 TENERE Thread

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by VTbeemer, Apr 7, 2017.

  1. Bikeaddict

    Bikeaddict Bikeless Due To Recession

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    [there was some buffeting above 120 kms. I did see close to 170 kms on the screen. With a bit of ducking of course. Didn't check mpg though. I think I could live with the oem windscreen, maybe add an extra mra lip for longer trips]
  2. hookeniggy

    hookeniggy Good at getting lost

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    By far the best review i have read so far, maybe you can drop some pictures of you and the bike?

    Job well done.
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  3. janhama

    janhama Adventurer

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  4. PDublYu

    PDublYu Adventurer

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    It's a 1.75 gal Rotopax. I carried one that size along with a white 1 gal Rotopax for water across Africa a couple of years ago. Could have gone with a smaller one then. I used a 1 gallon Rotopax for fuel in SA and it was plenty.
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  5. djfoell

    djfoell Old enough to know better. Young enough to try.

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    You are correct that it doesn’t come like that, but those aren’t Givi parts. Those all appear to be Yamaha accessories based upon pictures that are posted elsewhere online.
  6. Bikeaddict

    Bikeaddict Bikeless Due To Recession

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  7. Bikeaddict

    Bikeaddict Bikeless Due To Recession

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    OK, so a few things about the 790 Adv bikes. Test rode both, there wasn't even the option to take them off road, so another 'street' opinion. I was impressed by the absence of weight, superb balance, very good suspension (non R), excellent suspension (R), a hell of an engine but a bit wild for my taste - its difficult to relax on them, great handling, build quality was on a par with the Tenere me thinks, all in all I really liked them and I would choose the R because it fitted me perfectly. But price matters and the difference between the Tenere and the 790 Adv, even the non R, doesn't reflect the real distance between them which is very close.
  8. hookeniggy

    hookeniggy Good at getting lost

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    So would a modified Tenere be at par with the KTM?
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  9. New Order

    New Order Adventurer

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    I have tested my friends 790 R. It is quite good. I really like it. I am a noob, so I definitely can't use the bikes capacity at all. But I really don't understand why the bikes with good suspension (like the R) is set so hard. It is not comfortable at all. My old XT660R is soft, but I really prefer the suspension that way. And I hope that the Tenere is softer set in the suspension than the 790 R. Is it?
  10. hookeniggy

    hookeniggy Good at getting lost

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    It has to be like that otherwise the suspension cannot absorb big hits if you're riding hard.
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  11. New Order

    New Order Adventurer

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    I get that. But not everyone is riding their bikes so hard that they need it to be that stiff. I'll much rather have a bike that uses 95% of it's suspension travel and bottoms out sometimes, than a bike that never bottoms out and is uncomfortable and stiff.
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  12. Chris S

    Chris S Been here awhile

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    Had a chance to have a good look over and a spin a an XT700 on trail and grass for 45 mins.
    3800 miles on the clock.

    Start it up and you can’t help grinning at that grunty CP2 motor – much less harsh than a 790R I also tried (off road only).
    Best Jap motor for years.
    On the easy trails and the bumpy Midlands backroads we were led along, suspension felt plush.
    Love that preload adjuster knob.

    I’ve written a detailed review here. Summary below.

    [​IMG] Engine character and response – it’s perfect
    • Fully adjustable, plush suspension
    • Pre-load adjustment knob
    Weighs 205kg (unverified). Same as my 660Z and less than my 2015 CB500X RR
    • Flat but grippy textured seat
    • Brakes feel good, road or dirt
    • Brisk and agile on the road
    • A display scroll button now on right bar
    • 25,000-mile valve-clearance intervals
    • Well set up cockpit
    • Centre stand – at least an available option
    • OMG – no beak!

    [​IMG] • Is it such a bargain? Over £2k more than an MT-07
    • At 16-litres, the tank could use a couple more
    • Top-heavy at a standstill
    • Non-adjustable screen
    Handguards are plastic
    • Screw-in filler cap – a saving too far
    • At 34.5″ (875 mm), stock seat too high for many
    • Tall riders will need bar risers to stand comfortably, but stock risers are already long

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


  13. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    Those pannier are Givi looking.
    The top box attachment sure is.
    Maybe Givi is the OEM supplier as they build all this stuff anyway and the EU T7 is Italian focused and you know Givi of course is.

    Someone has to be making those parts for the T7?
  14. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    I have a 28" inseam and find 34-35" seat height bikes easy enough to ride off-road.
    I think many are just too soft these days because other mfg are offering up 32" or so seat height bikes.

    Of course the aftermarket and Yamaha will has solutions. Seat Concepts and others will no doubt do a low seat. Yamalink will have a lowering link. Suspension tuners can lower a bike. I'm sure Japanese company Zeta will have solutions asap.
    http://www.zeta-racing.com/sus/index.html

    Since this bike is the first bread of new mid-size Japanese core dirt focused ADV bikes, the aftermarket is going to gush and rush on it like flies on shit.
    The parts available will be over the top.
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  15. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    100% those are Givi mono key locks!
    I'd bet Givi built those crash bars too.
  16. hookeniggy

    hookeniggy Good at getting lost

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    Is that her Majesty's back yard? georgous settings!!
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  17. hombacher

    hombacher Niederrheiner

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    @Bikeaddict thank you for your impressions regarding the new Tenere 700, shared with us.

    Regarding your estimation the KTM "Adventure" is the superior bike compared to the T700, I am different opinion. Just because the price, for me this is a far away or other bike category. High priced, fitted with everything, wished to be an adventure bike class, or something similar. But as people tend to comparison, I also had the chance to make a test ride with a 790 "Adventure".

    It was the non R only, because no Adventure R demo bike was available. The standard is available immediately if you like, here in Germany. Very low sales numbers make the bike already shown with high discounts.
    Nevertheless, I took my test ride and felt very very cramped. The low seat height, the high mounted food pegs, the very narrow handlebar and the very close windshield gave a very encapsulated feeling. No feeling of freedom, open space or even room for the next adventure ride to the horizon. In respect to the very narrow knee angle I would not assume this would be comfortable for hours to ride.
    The high pegs (or low seat height) made it very tiring to stand up onto the pegs as well. I am 179 cm only, but this was not roomy, not comfy, not adventure.

    The brakes needed a lot of hand force, tiring as well and using all four fingers is appreciated. Next to the high hand force the braking itself felt dump or dull. No sharp neither precise feeling was backed by those two calipers.

    When driving there was every time a resistance in cornering with the 790 "Adventure". You remember those stand-up cups for children? It was needed a bigger momentum to get into the curves than known from any other 21/18" wheeled adventure bike. It could be the Avon tires, but I think it is the low tank, put there like old saggy hangers. I do not know how to follow ruts with that design. Maybe if the GS in front of you gets stuck, you shall turn and search for an other route?

    The engine I already knew from a test ride on a 790 Duke. This time I was positively surprised that touring with low rpm is possible. No fueling only nicely rotating engine. A pitty is the noise, which may come from the surrounded engine with bash plate, tank etc. All mechanic noise is directly guided to the driver's ear. Coming from the Yamaha CP2 engine, the snappy feel or the immediate kicking into the ground feeling on the throttle was not given by the KTM. It felt a little asthmatic, I was not really able to imagine to do a kick start to jump over an obstacle coming along. But maybe this is designed as it is, permanently high reving to give that super sporty feedback.

    The suspension of the standard "Adventure" did not impress me in any way. Far to stiff, not reacting on edges in the asphalt and all in all very uncomfortable. Thinking of an adventure bike, there should be some comfort, if kilometers on tarmac have to be beaten. I know, there is usually to be done some rework to a suspension, but here it felt like, it is not only changing the springs and some new oil for the forks or some new valves for the rear shock. It is more or less the complete mechanic overhaul to make the suspension work. Less ready to race, just a very cheap suspension which is tagged with the WP label, which you pay for.
    Jumping off the tarmac onto the gravel or green verge beside the road, the suspension worked okay, but nothing more...

    Finishing my little test of about 80 to 90 kilometers I have to summarize, KTM should have been honest. This 790 "Adventure" is more a Duke 790 GT, put some 17" wheels on it, improve the brakes and the suspension, you will have a proper and very good touring bike. I went to my little XSR700 and drove away with a smile (for the records, bought as a used one for 5.5 kEUR, now in total three years old, more than 30 tkm on the clock, but it came me not in mind for a single second to give away 12 kEUR or more for the test bike or even a lot more of her sister the Adventure R).

    Anyhow:
    My wife ordered a new Tenere 700. During one of the last motorbike shows in the beginning of the year, she sat on the T700 and the both 790. She liked the prototype of the 790, which we have seen in flesh half a year before. But with the final shape and look, it was the T700, which won here's heard. Sitting on the T700 it felt much more comfortable for her, compared to the KTMs. It was the more open knee angle, seat to handlebar distance, etc. So she pre-ordered that T700.
    As we have learned and seen in all the test reports and videos, I think she made a very good decision. In all the points, where in my opinion the KTM falls short the T700 is pointing. We will see, what July will bring, or September, or October...
  18. djfoell

    djfoell Old enough to know better. Young enough to try.

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    I agree completely that they look like a Givi part, and they might even be compatible with some Givi accessories, but I’m almost certain that they are OEM Yamaha accessories. It’s likely that Yamaha thinks the Givi parts look good too, so they copied the look. Regardless, I’m not sure if I like the lights mounted on the crash bars. It seems to me that they offer a great place for stuff to snag onto. I prefer the higher fairing mount points, but I don’t know that I would even want those. I’ll have to wait and see the bike in the flesh before I worry too much about accessories.
  19. hookeniggy

    hookeniggy Good at getting lost

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    Probably 95% of the riders do.
    The rest of us have to go suspension shopping in Sweden...
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  20. hookeniggy

    hookeniggy Good at getting lost

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    I am really hoping that i will like a new bike for once in a lifetime, if not i guess i wil have to continue riding around with black fingernails trying to figure out which bike is the partsbike...and probably stay single for the rest of my life, lol. T8.5.jpg
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