Yamaha T7 TENERE Thread

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by VTbeemer, Apr 7, 2017.

  1. tonyubsdell

    tonyubsdell Ténéré Supporter

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    taken from the neighbor forum with the 790 adv guys:

    [​IMG]
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    seems the seams are not correctly welded together.
    skidplate is said to be refunded.

    source:

    https://advrider.com/f/threads/ktm-790-adventure-r-owners-show-yours.1378090/page-79

    cheers,
    wolfram
  2. mcmann

    mcmann Adventure Rider Junkie Supporter

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    Dangggg . . . the 790 ADV R Rally looks like a toy next to your awesome (highly modified) T7:-)
    I bet the low RPM torque of the T7 makes it easier to handle the tight stuff over the 790?
    585863B0-4449-4BC0-B016-532FC7982C85.jpeg
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  3. tonyubsdell

    tonyubsdell Ténéré Supporter

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    yes, low end grunch is way better on the T7.
    i have not yet ridden my above pictured ktm rally 790 but the same spec'ed engine in the "R" model.
    this engine really needs rpm, below say 3000 it does not feel and sound right, it has the tendency to cut if you are not quick with the clutch lever. YMMV
    this might be a reason why the all new 890 adv model has 20% more weight slung around its crank which adds to its low end torque and better behaviour under 3000 rpm.
    (the ktm ingeneers must have tried the new tenere and have concluded: we'll have to improve the engine manners ;-) )
    for riders who like this typical "ready to race" kind of power display of the 790 it will be perfect.
    the guys describing their riding experience in the neighboring ktm forums are mainly really happy with their ride.
    a great bunch of people also, by the way...

    what is doable with the 790 adv can be seen when a certain chris birch is in the saddle. same counts for pol tarres showing off with the T7.
    against those i am a sort of off road dyslectic...

    you guys owning the T7 might already have experienced that having come to a stop and get riding again, sometimes you find yourself in second gear instead of first. this is not a problem for the T7. the 790 would cut abruptly if you do not nurse the clutch.

    for my personal riding style the tenere 700 suits me just perfect.
    that might be the reason why my 790 rally has not been ridden at all and i am even thinking of selling it sooner or later.

    to come back to the beginning of this post and to answer tom's question:
    the T7 as it comes out of the box is easier to handle in the slow and tight stuff: if you don't bolt on a wide engine guard, the tenere is significantly less wide than the 790 and thus not as susceptible to getting hooked on rocks or stuck in narrow deep ruts. the nice engine personality helps tractoring it at low rpm's, chances are less that the engine cuts out.
    but it is still a handful with its 450 lbs...

    stay you guys safe and resistant, cheers for now,
    wolf
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  4. cbig

    cbig Rift- Raft, SCooter Trash

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    I enjoy reading you guy's thread. Originally was interested in a t700. Rode one at a dealer. My main dirt bike buddy asked ifni was interested in selling my xsr900 and going adv, we could get discounts on two t700's, and he wanted me to negotiate. We only found 1. Got it for him otd in SOCAL 11,500. Black. Back in October.

    Don't accept that bs Adom. While waiting for more t700's to come to market, hopefully before our Burney falls trip, I test rode a 790r. All it took. I was otd at 14k... so you guys paying 13, 13.6k for t700 might want to search around.

    Both bikes are great. Loved the simplicity of the t700. Didn't like the gap around 3rd gear, but rest of bike nice. Good off idle torque.. Best comparison I'd say is the t700 isbsimilar to a xr600/650r and the 790 more like a 450..you got to rev a bit more off idle but things pick up faster. T700 and 790 people are like minded, similar travel ideas. Look forward to seeing how both bikes develop. Obligatory pic.. powerhouse on Pitt river 20201021_150744.jpg
  5. KICKNBACK

    KICKNBACK Old enough to know better young enough not to care

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    I have used the AXP or the rebranded Moose skid plates on smaller bikes in the past and have had great success but in the last couple years something has changed with there quality or maybe rushing to market without much testing, thinking using technology from past bikes will follow to new bikes. The T7 and 790 use a lot of plastic to cover a large area I think a doubler in behind joints would make since.
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  6. ride2little

    ride2little Riding Like the Wind

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    Ive seen as many broken or faulty aluminum plates as plastic ones. I don’t see any widespread issues. Do you?
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  7. octagonpilot

    octagonpilot _________________

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    I just went through this LED deal. Got all the stuff through Amazon. The biggest issue I hit was getting the rear LED signals plugged in to the stock harness, because the adapter plugs I bought didn’t have enough length. So you wind up having to decide whether to solder some extra length in to make up the difference, or, as I decided to do, I cut the wires off of the stock rear turn signals to use to feed the rear LED signals.

    I’m using flush mount LEDs up front, but I may end up switching to the stalk style for the running light feature.

    The wiring hook up on those stalk types, black is Ground, yellow is for the turn signal and the red is for the red running light (so use those on the rear) and the white wire is for the white running light for up front use.

    I pulled the stock relay and zip tied the new LED flasher relay to a tan on the frame.

    the stuff I used:

    2F818519-1BE7-4940-A97D-CF3D84D8DABA.jpeg FA134C68-3254-4355-B944-D8A72627736F.jpeg 394C3A0E-88F7-496E-95AC-28E46423DDFC.jpeg 45D5AEFC-BD5E-45E2-93A7-FBE2AFF2F5DE.jpeg
  8. ktmcrush

    ktmcrush Been here awhile

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    The best source for technicals is in the tech tips section of tenere700.net.
    Or
    Search tenere700.net Signals...etc.

    That forum has more technical how to and alternative choices that people add on.

    From CT, U S A
  9. Benduro

    Benduro Motorodeo Supporter

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    That last part with the odometer reading, I've certainly encountered when bringing a newish moto in from another state where it's fairly obvious is not a CA bike as it has a different state's plate on it.

    I'm just used to KTMs and BMWs where they only import one model from europe as it's cheaper to do so, plus they have to pass strict euro emmisions anyway.

    Though, it should be told, merely as an academic point mind you, that one can purchase on ebay, a CA emissions compliant sticker for Triumphs and affix it to the spot on the airbox lid or whatever they're supposed to be (model specific locations and sticker types).

    Not that I've ever done that or anything.

    Or, like, bought a vapor computer and inputted 9,000 miles and affixed it to a moto before taking it to DMV.

    That, I can assure you, I'VE NEVER DONE.
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  10. tag3

    tag3 Doofus

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    Flash. I may have to now though.
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  11. KICKNBACK

    KICKNBACK Old enough to know better young enough not to care

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    Got my spring on without the right tools and still have all my fingers
    E7D1BD93-0265-472D-8E9D-BC1CA72EBC2A.jpeg
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  12. MikeCMP

    MikeCMP Been here awhile

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    you use the ratchet strap and floor jack approach?

    Mike
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  13. duibhceK

    duibhceK duibhce Kaelann

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    I remember one time in a shack somewhere in Georgia (the country) where we had to service a shock with nothing but tire irons, a strap, a file, a vise and a large spanner. Replaced the spring, seals and oil. Took a while and a lot of cussing.
    We were both very glad we still had all our fingers at the end of the day.
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  14. MikeCMP

    MikeCMP Been here awhile

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    I forgot to post this to advrider, about a week ago I had gotten a cheap scissor jack just to do basic maintenance on the T700. First time I used the jack I installed the rally raid rear shock, no real problem. Was going to go for a ride so the next day went to put the bike up again. The jack was really hard to turn, then suddenly the nut snapped off the end, the jack collapsed, the bikes wheels hit the ground and it fell over on the right side HARD. Luckily on the opposite side of me. Ended up smashing in my right side air scoop and scratching the right wind deflector.


    Bike was barely two weeks old at the time. Of course, it bent the exhaust too...
    2B1F8C9A-3113-4974-AA8A-2865BCF7CDF5.jpeg A1299C41-1C9A-4309-B1DB-4936A4DEFECA.jpeg
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  15. norton73

    norton73 drinkin' in the garage Supporter

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  16. TNC

    TNC Candyass Camper

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    This youtube vid surely had to be posted here at some point, but I haven't run across it. I'll link it here. I'm so impressed with the engine on the T7. You can tell it has some awesome low end grunt. Yeah, the riders are pretty darned good, and the trails they're riding on aren't Carl's Dinner level difficulty, but it still shows what a big bike can do. Again, the T7 was extremely impressive.

    KTM 790 and Yamaha Tenere 700 - HARD ADVENTURE - YouTube
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  17. tonyubsdell

    tonyubsdell Ténéré Supporter

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    outch! i feel sorry. could easily have happened to me, too.
    broken side cover is said to cost less than 100 us$ if i am not mistaken.
    "camelADV" has posted a pic with a stiched fairing, if that would be an option for you.
    blinkers are way overrated... ;-)

    try and take it easy, stay safe, cheers,
    wolf
  18. TNC

    TNC Candyass Camper

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    mcmann, I'm guessing you've seen my post about my Kawasaki Z650, but it's funny how your MT-07 tweak is almost identical to my Z650 tweak...and the reason you have the MT when you also have a T7...a more nimble, lighter bike when the mood strikes. Sounds like you had the same issue I did on your MT...cramped ergos. I did the seat pad thing...an only-gel model that fit my saddle profile almost exactly. I was also able to raise the front of the saddle about an inch where it contacts the frame. I also dropped the footpegs about an inch and switched to a more dirt style peg.

    My Z doesn't have ABS, so it's the closer-to-400 pound version. I'm with you on the issue of having a bike this light that handles this well without it being a sport bike, crotch rocket...though power is more than adequate.

    Attached Files:

  19. Snowbird

    Snowbird Cereal Killer

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    I'm sorry that happened to you; it sucks. That said, every motorcycle owner needs to, at minimum, fab up some way to hold the front wheel so the bike cannot tip over. Bonus if it works on the back wheel too. It is easy to imagine a way to build a wheel holder out of 2x4" lumber and some nails. If you don't like that idea, you can buy any number of offerings from Harbor Freight or other sellers at a range of prices.

    One more thing while we are talking unexpected tip overs of a motorcycle on on a center stand: Cut a 2x4 or similar wood to lift the bike and put it under the right side of the swing arm near the axle before long-term storage. That way, if the rear tire loses air, you will not return to a bike on its side.
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  20. TNC

    TNC Candyass Camper

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    Other than pure dirt bikes and DS bikes, I never owned a street bike without a centerstand...until my current Z650. The dirt and DS bikes had flat bottom skid plates, so propped up on a crate, stand, or even one of those cheap "lever-over" stands under the skid plate or frame tubes was more than sufficient for work or long term sitting.

    I recently popped for a Venom headlift stand that compliments the rear spool stand for my Z. For a little over $100 for the pair, it was a surprisingly robust design that allows all kind of work to be done to the bike with extreme stability. I was leery of the price vs. quality of these stands as compared to the Pit Bull and other "gold standards", but there is nothing flimsy about their design. Poor instructions?...yes. One warning on the headlift stand, there are two kits that have different sized inserts for the hole in the bottom of the headtube. Read carefully to choose the right one...mine was 27mm. I never appreciated these styles of stands from just seeing them, but I'm sold on their functionality now. And bikes without flat bottom skid plates that have exhausts running underneath, these are the solution.
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