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Yamaha T700 Tenere owners thread

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by BDG, Jul 17, 2019.

  1. twinrider

    twinrider Pass the catnip

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    Aug 20, 2002
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    日本
    If you’re mostly off-road (trails) keep the tubes, if you’re riding all roads (including dirt) go tubeless and carry a spare front tube just in case you can’t plug a flat. It will work in the rear as well in a pinch.
    Ginger Beard and windblown101 like this.
  2. r1d3rg652gs

    r1d3rg652gs Tenere700

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2012
    Oddometer:
    622
    Location:
    Greece
    I am thinking of getting a pair of wheels from rally-raid that offers the barttubeless kit...I think the tubeless wheels have a different valve than the tubetype ones...I ride 70 on road 30 off-road and commute everyday so...tubeless is the way...
  3. windblown101

    windblown101 Long timer Supporter

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    Can't effectively have both working at the same time due to the valve stem differences. Tubeless is far more convenient and lighter. Tubes will cover more damage scenarios but are more of a pita.

    Regardless of which you choose have the supplies and experience to install a tube in the field, or never ride without friends that have the experience and tools, or stick to places that have cell phone reception that a tow truck can reach. Being in some remote area without practical experience with removing a tire, breaking a tire bead, and installing a tube without damaging it could make for a very bad time.

    As a last resort I carry these on the bike at all times even when I have zero tools on me. 22" heavy duty zip ties. You can wrap them around a flat tire to keep it from peeling off the rim and be able to keep moving, just very slowly...

    Attached Files:

  4. Timemachine

    Timemachine Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    May 12, 2015
    Oddometer:
    190
    Location:
    Longwarry, Victoria, Australia
    When I say zero PSI, I am referring to the reading on a pressure gauge which measures the differential between outside and inside the tire.
    Ginger Beard, Robotaz and DavidM1 like this.
  5. DavidM1

    DavidM1 Unicorn hunting

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    I'd never thought how pressure gauges actually display - you're right.

    "Gauge pressure is zero-referenced against ambient air pressure, so it is equal to absolute pressure minus atmospheric pressure" - Wikipedia

    Cheers, my eyes have been opened.

    On a similar subject - should you deflate a bit for altitude? The differential must get bigger - it's ambient 8.3 PSI at 15,000ft (14.5 PSI at sea level).

    Sorry, slightly off topic.
    Ginger Beard likes this.
  6. SkipD

    SkipD That looks stickey

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2010
    Oddometer:
    430
    Location:
    Gold Coast
    The T700 is still a heavy bike dont know how low you are wanting to go before you start bending rims. I guess that depends where you ride, 22PSI will still hold a tire on a non safety bead ok but rims will be getting fairly beaten up (front mainly).
    Only slow leaks I have ever had are on tubless (normally with something still embeded in the tire), tubes always go instantly in my books. Only time I have ever had tires come off rims is on a tube setup deflating quickly.
    In my mind its a no contest tubeless is much safer, the only disadvantage is you can not run very low pressures
    If you want to get a tire back on real quick in the bush spray some deodorant into the tire all the way round and set it alight, will put it on with about 10 PSI instantly (if you had any hair on your hands that will be fixed as well).
    Don T, twinrider and tonyubsdell like this.
  7. worncog

    worncog YBNormal Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2011
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    1,041
    Location:
    Florida Panhandle
    I run Tubliss on the KTM 270XC-F and also carry long zip ties as a 'get me home' method in the event of an inner bladder failure. Seven long heavy duty zip-ties looped in my pack. Also carry plug, worms, and a mtn bike pump for a typical puncture.
    Meet@Trudys and tonyubsdell like this.
  8. ktmmitch

    ktmmitch Long timer

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    uk
    Just changing the rear rim on my T7 from 18"x4,00 to 182x2,50 then I can run a rally 140-18 tyre & mousse, but with Bartubeless seal as well, then I inflate to 30 psi before leaving for a long road trip, release air when I arrive for off road day(s) and then blow back up fro return tarmac to home, been using this on other adv bikes for a while, no rim locks either. It takes the pressure off the mousse on the road sections that would normally cook it
  9. r1d3rg652gs

    r1d3rg652gs Tenere700

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2012
    Oddometer:
    622
    Location:
    Greece
    Doesn't it change the behaviour of the bike to go for a thinner rear rim?
  10. Sefti

    Sefti Adventurer

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    Jun 12, 2019
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    52
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    UK
    perfect, my wife and I around there often. I was trying to work out how to direct message to save others having to read my drivel but failed so sorry everyone! We’re pretty new to the trails around here and wondered if you know any other nice ones? That you’d care to share :-)
  11. ktmmitch

    ktmmitch Long timer

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    Makes it a bit quicker to turn in, but I did it just so I can run race tyre and bib mousse
    tonyubsdell likes this.
  12. boboneleg

    boboneleg we can rebuild him.

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2006
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    Bristol UK
    I have sent you a PM.
  13. Timemachine

    Timemachine Been here awhile Supporter

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    Location:
    Longwarry, Victoria, Australia
    Highly possible. I am expecting some instability at speed (the tire would have less "bracing" with a narrower rim), but benefit in quicker turning and rim protection, along with allowing the Tubliss system. And of course lighter unsprung weight.
    Meet@Trudys and tonyubsdell like this.
  14. MegaRowMan

    MegaRowMan MRM

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2013
    Oddometer:
    202
    Location:
    Wgtn NZ
    Hi All,

    My DIY Tool Tube, DONE :-)

    Best option was to Use existing two bolt fixing, Easy as to install & remove if needed

    Btw - Rally seat finally arrived to, Much better
    :beer

    T7- Tool tube 3.jpg
    T7- Tool tube 4.jpg

    T7- Tool tube 2.jpg
    oic, MrNemobody, RoyQ and 6 others like this.
  15. Harvey Krumpet

    Harvey Krumpet Long timer Supporter

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    At first glance I thought you had managed to mount the barby and plant pot, too. Much impressed.
    MegaRowMan likes this.
  16. twinrider

    twinrider Pass the catnip

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    17,311
    Location:
    日本
    First time to see a New Zealand suction cup plant in bloom.
    MegaRowMan and DavidM1 like this.
  17. Gummybear67

    Gummybear67 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2018
    Oddometer:
    48
    Location:
    Europe
    Hi Folks,

    is the rear OEM shock of the T700 a DPS design ?
    Any internal & technical details available ?
    Cheers
    Gummybear :1drink
  18. Aarslikkerdanny

    Aarslikkerdanny Adventurer

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2016
    Oddometer:
    52
    Hi y'all!

    I'm considering switching from my Ducati Multistrada Enduro 1200 to a T700. The Ducati is a great bike, i really love it, but it is far too heavy for our future use case. We recently purchased a Volkswagen bus camper and we want to take a motorbike with as on a Motolug trailer. Pushing the 280 kilo Ducati on and off this trailer is a real nightmare, even for 2 people. As i love riding off-road occasionally is am looking for an off-road bike which is high enough for me (6.2 or 191 centimeters) and capable of managing 2up (not all the time). In my opinion the T7 ticks all my boxes ;-). I previously owned a XTX660 and an XT500 and i have good experiences with Yamaha bikes.

    As i weigh 100 kilogram without clothing and after reading all previous posts about suspension and weight, i guess i have to think about getting stronger aftermarket suspension on the rear (and possible maybe in the front also)). Especially as my wife wants to join me on the bike on occasion which is no problem at all on the mighty Duc.Yes, we drove up Colle de Sommeiler (2993 meters high) on the Ducati together!

    Now i found this manufacturer in the Netherlands! who make custom rear shocks. Does anybody on the forum have experience with these specific models or with stronger rear shocks for the T7??

    https://www.off-the-road.de/en/700-...k-shock-with-Reservoir-Yamaha-Tenere-700.html

    Drive safely!
  19. ktmmitch

    ktmmitch Long timer

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    Do you mean PDS design ??
    Gummybear67 likes this.
  20. ktmmitch

    ktmmitch Long timer

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    Looks similar to OEM, but no Hydraulic Preload Adjuster, only manual threaded collar