Yamaha T700 Tenere owners thread

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by BDG, Jul 17, 2019.

  1. BygDaddee

    BygDaddee Where do I get a pie

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    you need to broaden your horizons a bit :-)
  2. gpmucci

    gpmucci gpmucci

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    Thickness is 3mm of a very hard aluminium type
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  3. gpmucci

    gpmucci gpmucci

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    It is less than 3kg.
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  4. Chalk

    Chalk Been here awhile

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    I was wondering if you mounted the bag on the rack if you would be able to carry a pillion. Looks like there is plenty of room to on the back of the pannier frames.
  5. DORTx2

    DORTx2 Been here awhile

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    Anyone else annoyed at the accuracy of the gauges on this thing? The Speedo is 10km/h out at almost all times, the fuel gauge will stay at "full" for about 200km then by 250km it's flashing on "empty" but it still has 1/3rd of the tank left. And I don't know about you guys but the tach is pretty impossible to read accurately. Love the bike though.
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  6. ScorpionT16

    ScorpionT16 Been here awhile

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    Same boat, speedo is off, same fuel gauge situation. The tach is a little tricky to read, doesn't define redline, and the diagonal bars make it difficult to see what exact RPM I'm at.

    Tech Tip: The Canadian bikes have a different exhaust from the Euro ones, open the silver end cap, and there is a removable baffle/DB killer held in place with 4 nuts, takes 2-4mins to remove, very easy. The Euro bikes had a fixed baffle people had to dremel out. Bike sounds a lot more throaty and lively.
  7. sherloc

    sherloc Been here awhile

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    Looks Good! When ever I have a chance to get a T7, I’d be interested
  8. DORTx2

    DORTx2 Been here awhile

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    Awesome, thanks for the tip! Sounds much better.
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  9. Solarbronco

    Solarbronco Long timer Supporter

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    Could that possibly be a spark arrestor? Those are required in the PNW on dirt roads or trails. Doesn't take much to start a forest fire and get a $300 million dollar firefighting bill, which is govt ordered and cannot be bankrupted. there is a guy in Idaho who owes 80 million for a fire. He'll be living in a shack and paying for that for the rest of his life.
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  10. boboneleg

    boboneleg we can rebuild him.

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    You need a bike first :lol3
  11. DWEL700

    DWEL700 Adventurer

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    Thanks Scorp I am going to do that when I get home tonight.
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  12. rsteiger

    rsteiger Bob Supporter

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    The speedo thing is fairly common to most Japanese Motorcycles. Not sure why they do it but just about every Japanese bike I have owned (Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki, and Yamaha) read 7 to 10% high. However the Odometer tends to read true so I am guessing this may be some sort of thing in their design specifications (most likely some legal or liability requirement). I have only owned a few Euro bikes and I don't recall that being an issue except for on two bikes the speedo stopped working.

    As far as the fuel gage goes well my V-Strom always reads low. I will be showing about 50 miles left to go but yet I have enough fuel in the tank to do closer to 150 miles. Tank shapes and fuel pump assemblies often make it cost prohibitive to get an accurate reading on fuel level so I think they try to put a little fudge factor in there to ensure you don't run out. Also running a FI bike low on fuel does not help with fuel pump life. I guess it is better to read that way than the other way.
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  13. ScorpionT16

    ScorpionT16 Been here awhile

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    It just looks like a db killer/suppressor, I'm yet to see any sparks fly out of the back. I'll take a picture later to show it, good thing is it can be easily put back on if you need to for trails. Just a note for anyone who does do it, the silver end cap changes color due to the heat, vs before the baffle directs the air out
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  14. Uncle Conan

    Uncle Conan Been here awhile Supporter

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    According to parts list, #18 in exhaust is the spark arrester.
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  15. Burner29

    Burner29 Adventurer

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    Yup I'd be keeping that in if you're heading off pavement...
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  16. Solarbronco

    Solarbronco Long timer Supporter

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    Keep it in if you are riding anywhere near dry grass or forests, even if on pavement.
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  17. MrNemobody

    MrNemobody Been here awhile

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    Which crash bar are this?
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  18. TheMuffinMan54

    TheMuffinMan54 Been here awhile

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    Just wrapped up my 1000km service tonight, noted a few things that may be of interest (to North American owners at least):
    - oil is super easy to change...1 drain bolt, 1 big automotive style spin on filter, huge filler cap so you don’t even need a funnel you can just pour it in right from the bottle (having owners an XSR700 previously I already knew this but just figured I would mention it anyway). Just be sure to get a new crush washer for the drain plug as the bolt was SUPER tight and the factory washer was completely flattened...might not seal up if you try to re-use it.

    - a couple of very un-Yamaha things I found when adjusting the chain tension: the axle nut was WAY over tight, like 120+ ft/lbs (spec is 77) and both the locknuts on my chain adjusters were loose. Even if you find your chain tension doesn’t need to be adjusted, be sure to break everything loose and make sure it gets torqued up properly. Also, the spec for chain tension in the owners manual seems a little out to lunch...I set it right in the middle of the recommended 43-48mm from the bottom of the chain guide to the centre of the chain and it felt too tight, but that could be because I had the back wheel completely off the ground and the book calls for you to adjust it on the side stand? Anyway I set it to the loose end of the spec 48mm and it seemed to be in the ball park.

    - drive setup is a 525 which seems overkill for a bike of this power level...even the KTM 790 which has 20 more hp uses a 520. I’ll be looking into a 520 conversion using FZ07 parts could be a good way to drop a couple pounds and decrease rolling resistance.

    - found an interesting discovery while screwing around with the chain...the bottom of the swing arm on the drive side has a couple of threaded holes that look like they could be for an off-road style chain guide. Cool idea, except if you don’t use them they are a great way for water to get in your swing arm and corrode your chain adjuster bolts. Look to plug them in the meantime and be sure to take out your chain adjuster bolts and coat them with antiseize when you do your first tire change.
    IMG_0910.jpg

    - speaking of tire changes, the rear axle nut is recessed quite deep in the swing arm, so be sure to check your trail tool fitment as a lot of pack-style axle wrenches have a thick flange around the box-end and probably won’t fit...you’ll need to carry a 27mm socket or a wrench with a very low profile box-end. (Not the best pic but you get the idea) IMG_0911.jpg

    - Lastly, I don’t know if this has been a problem with the European models but I hear there are issues with the evap canisters on the Canadian bikes...apparently if you fill the tank up to the top and leave it parked in the sun the buildup of fumes clogs the canister, vapour locks the fuel system and the bike won’t start. I’ll be looking to ditch mine soon...it’s just a simple 2 hoses in, 1 hose out type of deal with no electronics plugged into it so with a bit of tubing and a Y-fitting it should be easy enough to remove. Hell the thing is massive enough you might be able to put a small tool role in its place. IMG_0912.jpg

    That’s is for now...happy wrenching guys!
  19. colddog

    colddog Adventurer

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    I'm coming up on my 1000km service right away, will keep your observations in mind! Thanks for sharing!
  20. boboneleg

    boboneleg we can rebuild him.

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    I got out on my bike for the first time on Monday for 11 weeks due to lockdown. I just did 165 miles around the back roads of the Cotswolds but it was great to ride this bike again .

    IMG_6687.jpeg