Yamaha XT250 Thread - All things related to the XT from riding to modifications.

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by RL Lemke, Sep 23, 2018.

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  1. NicKel78

    NicKel78 Been here awhile

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    The sign on the other side of the cones on the opposite bank said "Road Closed". Challenge accepted!

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    IMG_7554 2.jpg
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  2. JB44

    JB44 Been here awhile

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    Another pleasant afternoon trying out the 16 tooth sprocket:

    [​IMG]

    For me there is no downside.
    First gear is still low enough....maybe not if you are slow-riding a rock garden...:hmmmmm
    .....but that's something I'll never do.

    I did ride a couple of miles on the "four-lane".

    Managed a steady 65 mph on the flat and level, but when going uphill, I could feel the bike gradually slowing.

    If I had to do that speed on a regular basis, I would choose a different bike.

    I felt a lot more comfortable cruising at 55 mph.

    jb
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  3. JB44

    JB44 Been here awhile

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    Here's a short video (8 min) of the same roads that I ride regularly.

    As you can see, there is no extreme riding necessary, just an enjoyable ride in the forest (roads are tame enough for a Honda Monkey...:-) :



    Kyle, the man who shot the video runs The Farmhouse Inn in Tellico Plains, TN

    I often pass by when visiting the local bakery for lunch:

    [​IMG]

    The weather has been ideal the past few days. Going out for another afternoon ride.

    jb
  4. Realmswalker

    Realmswalker n00b

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    Hello everyone,

    Thank you for all your responses and advice. After riding the bike four times for a few hours each time, it does feel cramped to me. So I decided to make my own seat as no one on earth makes a seat that adds 3 to 4 inches, which is what I needed. So at great personal and mental health risk, I present to you my homemade seat, vinyl and high-density foam. My son said he gives it a solid 1 out of 5, my friend said it looks like I ripped the arm off a sofa and made it a seat, another friend said I missed the valve on my tire and accidentally added air to my seat, despite all that, it feels soooooooo good! Also, I got the extended shifter I needed. So without further ado, for your viewing and general displeasure.... you may need to wash your eyes out after seeing it.

    Also, if anyone knows a company that will make a custom seat for my bike, that would be awesome.

    20201019_171322.jpg

    Attached Files:

  5. flei

    flei cycletherapist

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    I, for one, think it's great!:clap
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  6. flei

    flei cycletherapist

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    Dat shifter! :bow (sorry, no music video for this one)
  7. flei

    flei cycletherapist

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    Seriously though, all that matters is that the bike works well for you! Who cares how it looks or what anyone else thinks?

    IMO, though at times you wouldn't know it here on ADV, it is supposed to be about riding the bike, not just looking at it.
  8. JB44

    JB44 Been here awhile

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    Another cloudless, blue sky day in NC/TN.

    Rode over the mountain to Tellico Plains via TN68.

    Gassed up at the Exxon station.... 81 mpg on the last tankful.

    Then rode back to NC via River Rd, State Line Campground, part paved, part gravel.

    Passed by Bald River Falls:

    [​IMG]

    Then on the gravel:
    Had to be extra careful....these are one lane roads, but two way traffic.
    And it's hunting season...met 5 or 6, 4-wheel drive pickups coming the other way:

    [​IMG]

    Back to pavement......almost
    North Carolina's idea of resurfacing a paved road is to spray tar over the surface, then spread an inch or two of loose gravel over it..... :dirtdog

    [​IMG]

    The ride back to the cabin:

    [​IMG]

    jb
  9. NicKel78

    NicKel78 Been here awhile

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    IMG_7545.jpg
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  10. JohnBoyNC

    JohnBoyNC Been here awhile

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    So the service manual doesn't give any preload setting specs and only says to remove the rear shock to adjust. Thanks Yamaha....

    Any suggestions on how to best access the adjustment ring without removing the shock? Can you get to it by just removing the seat? How about shock shaft full travel length as a basis for preload setting? What are people using as their preload setting, 20 - 25%?

    TIA
  11. gseur

    gseur Been here awhile

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    If it’s like the Tricker, there’s no preload adjustment.
  12. flei

    flei cycletherapist

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    There is a way to set pre-load without taking off the shock. It's kind of a PITA. Basically, with the rear wheel elevated and you working from the side of the bike, use a long punch, rod or screwdriver, hold it to the "ear" of the lock nut and with a hammer hit the punch to loosen the lock nut. Then you use the same tool to turn the ring which adjusts the spring to set the pre-load. It's very slow going. I don't know what the standard setting is, or how to use math to set the pre-load, but i figured at 195lbs I weigh more than the "average rider" it is factory-set for, so I tightened it up some.
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  13. CloudSplitter

    CloudSplitter Putterer

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    John, shock preload isn't an exact science, but if you weigh 200 lb or more, you probably want to adjust the shock preload to it's maximum (adjust spring length, with the rear wheel off the ground, to its minimum allowable). It isn't difficult with the punch-and-hammer method mentioned above, but you need to remove the right rear decorative plastic. Then, the only hard part is measuring the length of the spring, to set it at the minimum, because there's a lot of stuff in the way.
    .
    .
  14. JB44

    JB44 Been here awhile

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    This afternoon I spent an hour dodging outcrops of bedrock, loose rocks, ruts, and potholes......15 miles of rough forest service road that felt like 50.... :(

    Eventually made it back to pavement, and decided to take another route home.

    On a downhill stretch of nicely paved highway in 5th gear (wide open throttle):

    [​IMG]

    Going back uphill, the bike managed to hold 60 mph.
    But if the incline were any longer or steeper, I would have had to downshift to 4th.

    It felt very uncomfortable traveling at that speed....don't think I will try it again.

    And I think it affected the gas mileage.

    76 mpg at the next fill up.

    jb
  15. matt-moto

    matt-moto n00b

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    [QUOTE

    [​IMG]

    For the next 3 weeks I rode the bike on pavement and gravel roads.

    Checked the tire pressure each day....exactly 22 psi.

    At the end of the 3 weeks the tire still had 22 psi without having to add any air.

    YMMV

    jb[/QUOTE]

    I just joined the forum and ordered the wheels from Japan as well. I have a new 2021 xt250. What tubeless tires did you get? I plan to ride 90/10 offroad/onroad. Thanks for any help.
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  16. JB44

    JB44 Been here awhile

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    That's one of the drawbacks of the tubeless wheels.
    There are a limited number of tires and tread patterns available, especially if you want a 90/10....a true knobby.

    Most true offroad tires have big beefy knobs, and are tube-type.

    I bought the Shinko E-700 tubeless tires in one size larger than stock....were not available in stock size.

    I am very pleased with them, both on road and mild forest service roads...(have not ridden them in the rain ,mud or deep sand).

    They are said to be 60/40 road/offroad.

    [​IMG]

    I am not sure you will find a tubeless knobby in the correct size.

    You may need to do a lot of searching, or maybe someone else on the forum has suggestions.

    If all else fails, you can always put a tube on the tubeless wheel and use a tube-type tire....but kind of defeats the purpose of the tubeless rim.

    In addition, most true knobby tires wear out quickly when used on pavement.

    Take a look at a Dunlop 606 ....might be a tire you could use, but don't think it's tubeless....it has a slightly taller sidewall profile than stock.

    jb
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  17. NicKel78

    NicKel78 Been here awhile

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    Here is the service manual page for the shock. There are min and max spring length adjustments. Actual preload is set based on sag. Here is a link to a video Mototrek did on setting sag that is really good. If you can't set you sag properly within the min/max settings of the service manual, then you need a higher or lower rate spring. Sag is very critical to proper suspension function. If you don't have enough, when you drop in a hole, say a pothole in the middle of the trail, then the rear wheel cannot move down far enough to stay in contact with the ground. On the other hand, if too much sag then when hitting bumps you risk "bottoming" out the suspension due to not enough compression travel. I have had good luck with about 35% sag and was running dirt roads this past weekend at up to 55mph with the same stability as on pavement. If you can't get it set and need a different spring, I highly recommend calling Cogent Dynamics. Todd was so helpful in answering my questions and setting me up properly on my XT that I can't recommend them enough.






    Screen Shot 2020-10-21 at 10.54.51 PM.png
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  18. Milano.B

    Milano.B Been here awhile

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    matt-moto said [/QUOTE]

    I just joined the forum and ordered the wheels from Japan as well. I have a new 2021 xt250. What tubeless tires did you get? I plan to ride 90/10 offroad/onroad. Thanks for any help.[/QUOTE]


    There are 3 Tubeless brands (OEM size 120/80-18) that I was able to find so far

    Brand , Model
    Bridgestone Battlax AX41
    Mitas E-07+
    Kenda K761
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  19. matt-moto

    matt-moto n00b

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    Thanks for the replies. I'll check them all out. Really, I'm looking for the most aggresive off road, but highway approved tire. They don't have to be 90/10. Most of my riding will be on dirt fire roads and single track, but there are several trails that I'll have to ride on pavement to access. The stock tires were having trouble on some of the single track and 4wd roads, especially in the steep and loose rocky sections.
    I'm going to look, but JB44 do you run the Shinko tubeless on the front also?
  20. JB44

    JB44 Been here awhile

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    [​IMG]

    Yes, 3.00-21

    I sealed the spokes so I did not need to use a tube in the front.

    I was a bit skeptical about the sealing. I had never tried it before.

    But after a month, and even yesterday's torture test of riding on rocks, ruts, and potholes, the sealed front tire has not lost a # of psi....still at exactly 22 psi as of this morning.

    A reminder if all your riding is off road, and you like to air-down your tires for better traction......tubeless tires may not be the best option.

    If you go much below 20 psi, the tubeless tires can lose their seal with the rim and deflate.

    jb
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