Yet another KLR succumbed to the Latin fever

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by igorshen, Nov 19, 2009.

  1. crashmaster

    crashmaster ow, my balls!

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    Alaska
    I heard from Igor just a couple of days ago so I'm sure he is fine.

    Gee, no one ever worries about me if I dont post for a month. Feel the love.:rofl:rofl:rofl
  2. GastonUSAChile

    GastonUSAChile Been here awhile

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    Miami,USA
    Guys, don't worry about him. We have been emailing each other for several days. He went from Lima to Chachapoyas, to see the ruins of Kuelap and coming again back to Huaraz and cordillera blanca. Most probably he will end in Lima this week as his final destination before flying out.

    Probably he is consuming all the beers and juices left in Peru before leaving.
  3. Meatn'taters

    Meatn'taters Not any more Supporter

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    Sonoma County, CA
    Dude - I went thru Crash withdrawals for quite a while, recovered from your bi-monthly posts, and now I'm shaking again. Where the heck are you and why you no cure my jonesin? You and Draggs were my heros - there's still time for you to regain this oh so coveted stature. Now post up soldier and get that awesome RR of yours re-booted.

    And yea, I'm not double shakin' from no Igor. Hope all is well with him - he's got a great RR going. How about an all okay por favor?
  4. igorshen

    igorshen gypsy soul

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    Hey guys,

    Everything is cool. I'm battling Peruvian bureaucracy for importation papers for the bike. Yeah, that puppy has already been peruvianized.

    My official riding part of this trip is over and I need to make the final post, but I've been dragging my feet.

    Otherwise, I had the best time in Caraz, in a very comfortable hotel - Los Pinos Lodge. I didn't really want to leave, but we had to come to Lima for the paperwork.

    Anyhow, thanks for the messages, it's good to know that people care :D

    Crashy, we care about you too :1drink

    Update coming soon...

    igor

    PS Meanwhile, can anyone guess how much that special edition, KLR IGORRRRRR, fetched in a bidding war?
  5. LumpyOne

    LumpyOne Been here awhile

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    WestSconnie
    With this epic report and solid preventative maintenance(hehe):D I am guessing $2100(US).

    I will miss this adventure!! It has been almost a year my friend and I feel like we are family. If you are ever in Minnesota we would love to put you up and hear of all your adventures!! With heavy heart I look forward to the final report.
  6. Adv Grifter

    Adv Grifter on the road o'dreams

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    !Ola' Igor! Glad to hear all is well!
    So, you've legally imported your bike into Peru' in order to sell it? Very smart move! Lets here the details of how you did this. (lots here have similar plans)

    I'd guess $3000 USD ? :evil Anything imported is outrageously expensive in Peru'. Two or Three times the cost in the US. Even junk Chinese bikes are expensive down there. Ones you buy here for $600 cost $2500 in Peru'.

    But I'm also guessing the taxes and fees were not cheap ... probably cut into
    your take home money quite a bit?

    Stay safe ... don't let those Soles burn a hole in your Coca leaf bag.
  7. VASCOdaGAMA

    VASCOdaGAMA Adventurer

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    Nov 8, 2009
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    City Park, Denver
    Glad to see that you are alive an kicking. Certainly sounds like a hassle to deal/sell the bike. Good luck with finalizing that.

    Really a great trip. Cool how you placed the travel narrative ahead of the personal narrative. You gave us all a real glimpse into the world you were riding through. An old school report in the tradition of travel writers of the past. Cheers!
  8. igorshen

    igorshen gypsy soul

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    Hey Lumpy,

    $2100? Wow, I was gonna let it go for $500 (without panniers). Seems you have higher opinion of the bike than I. Well, you are not way off (especially since I didn't mention that I am taking pannier back with me.

    The highest offer was $1770. However, we had to re-negotiate the deal once we came upon unsurmountable obstacles at the aduana.

    Thanks for your kind offer. It would be nice to meet you in person.

    Cheers


    Hey Grifter,

    Unfortunately, you give me more credit than I deserve. And it seems you're well-versed in Peruvian import laws.

    No, I didn't bring it in as import, only regular touristy stuff. Even one cop thought that it would be no problem to change things in Aduana in Lima. But as it turns out, the bike has to be taken out (through a land border) of the country and then brought back in on a different permit.

    Had I done it the right way, may be $3000 would be the right price. Instead, after discovering that we cannot just pay duties in Lima and have bike "nationalized", we re-negotiated the price down to about $1200. If I add some $1200-1500 that I saved on shipping this bike back, that's about $2500. I paid $3000 for the bike 55k miles ago, so I can't complain really.

    At least now I learned a lesson on importation of vehicles into Peru (must be done in advance). Too bad I will probably never get to use the knowledge. But this info may come in handy for some other travelers.

    Cheers



    Hey Vasco,

    Yeah, I expected hassle, but I thought there would be a way to do it. Unfortunately, we all lose, I got paid $500 less, gov didn't collect import duty, and those guys will have to hassle with non-registered bike (and they had the best intentions - paying duties, etc). Bureaucracy at its best.

    Glad to hear that you liked my RR. I'm not much of a writer (always hated it actually). I know my writing is too dry, but that's what you get from an engineer :wink:

    regards
  9. Louisg

    Louisg Adventurer

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    Laurentians, Qc
    Igor, don't underestimate yourself. I have followed your RR from the beginning and I make a living writing. You could easily make a good travel book out of your reports. I would even give you a good mark next to such a super travel writer as Paul Theroux, in his first book, when he traveled south America's trains (a long time ago). Your epic was the next best thing to swinging my right leg over my Kawa and doing it myself.
    Ride On, Louisg
  10. Supergringo

    Supergringo Hablar, bla bla bla.

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2009
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    Los Angeles
    Bidding war?

    I would have given you at least $10 for the bike!
  11. Kent11

    Kent11 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2009
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    Location:
    Nacogdoches, Texas
    I have been reading along as you traveled, and I thoroughly enjoyed your writing and your pics. Awesome report.

    Do you have plans to pick up another bike when you get home?
  12. igorshen

    igorshen gypsy soul

    Joined:
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    409
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    Asia
    Hey Louis,

    Thanks for your flattering comments. I'm glad you enjoyed my RR. I do read other people's writings and I can tell they are much more eloquent. I wish I could write like them, but I've always ran away from books without formulas :D

    Hope you get a chance to ride around SA and get to experience things yourself.

    Cheers


    Haha, this is exactly the kind of answer I expected when I asked people to guess how much I got. But they obviously haven't seen my baby :rofl

    Are you in the US already? Hope everything is going well...

    Let's have a drink in LA when we get back.

    igor


    Hey Kent,

    Yeah, I think I'll get another KLR. Originally I wanted Vstrom or something else a bit "better." But after this trip, not only did I have a hard-to-beat deal money-wise, but I was also very happy with what that bike could do. Now this comment comes from the guy who has only ridden a KLR. May be I would sing a different song had I tried a KTM, BMW or Suzuki. Still, every time I had to ride the bike up some stairs or pretty high steps to get it into a hotel, I was amazed by this bike's capabilities.

    Cheers
  13. igorshen

    igorshen gypsy soul

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2008
    Oddometer:
    409
    Location:
    Asia


    The route map is here.




    Day 273 – Flashback #1 – Nazca

    After a solid 12 hours of riding with barely a stop for pictures or eating, I arrived into Nazca just as the sun was setting. It was nice to drop down and feel some heat. It wasn't nearly as hot as in April when I was there there the first time, but it was more comfortable than in Cuzco.

    I enjoyed the switchbacks on the way between Cuzco and Nazca, but I wish I wasn't as stressed out about making it to Nazca.

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    Twisty road dropping down to Nazca

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    Barren landscape near Nazca

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    She loved posing


    Day 274 – Flashback #2 – Lima

    I had only about 400 km to ride to Lima. Soon after leaving Nazca, I entered clouds and that was the last time I saw sunlight for a while.

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    This is how they make lines near Nazca

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    Not sure if these are the real lines or not

    Luckily, the road went next to the ocean and it wasn't that cold. I passed by Huacachina and Paracas, but it wasn't worth visiting as everything was in the fog.

    I arrived into Lima around 4 PM. This time I followed Alain's recommendations and went straight to Hitchhiker's B&B. It was clean, had great parking (as a matter of fact, it was de-facto hub of overlanders in Lima).

    Day 275-277 – Lima R&R

    As much as I hated paying for a new tire just three weeks before dumping the bike, I had to have a new tire. The old one was too bald and I didn't want to die because of $80. A rider I rode with told me story of another guy who rode around the world just to die outside Ushuaia. Apparently, his tire blew up and he hit something and died. I'm cheap, but I still think my life is worth more than $80. So I went to a Pirelli dealer, got a rear tire (single most expensive tire in the store) and I had it installed at a Honda dealership.

    Next day I just took it easy. I wanted to go to the downtown, but managed to kill the whole day around Miraflores and beaches. For some strange, perverted reason, I really enjoyed Lima. It's got all conveniences of a modern city, low prices and I felt comfortable.

    The following day I really wanted to start wearing out that new tire, but it wasn't meant to be. After saying good bye to Serge and Monique, rode out of lime. Just as I managed to get out of the last of the Lima traffic jams, I realized that I forgot my butt-saver, Wallmart's seat cushion. I contemplated of riding for three weeks without it, but it could have made my trip miserable. So I went back to the hostel. After fighting the Lima traffic one more time, I was exhausted and it was already noon. Therefore, I decided to stay one more day there. I spent the rest of the afternoon in the downtown area. Once again, even though I've spent a few days there in April, I felt very comfortable and I wasn't even bored.

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    French riders Serge and Monique in Lima

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    San Martin monument in Lima. There was supposed to be a flame (in Spanish "llama") on the top of the head, but the artist misinterpreted order to mean llama animal.

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    Water park in Lima

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    Fountain laser show

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    Day 278 – Peru's mountain route

    Finally, I managed to get all of my stuff packed and ready to go early in the morning. It was another 2-hour battle to get out of Lima. Traffic in Lima can be heavy, but contrary to a lot of reports that I read on the internet, I found drivers to be very observant, cautious and some of them even courteous. Yes, there are some very aggressive bus and taxi drivers, but most other drivers are quite nice. I've had people give me way, stop for me to cross a street, etc. I don't think Lima is any worse than other cities I've been to. Ultimately, when I compare it to a total disregard of drivers on LA freeways for anyone but themselves, riding around South American cities is actually quite enjoyable.

    Once I was out of Lima, the road started climbing steadily. I was finally in the sun after 4-5 days. It was nice and warm. But after I got the the pass at around 5000 m, even though I was in the sun, cold wind penetrated my many layers and I was chilly again. Road to the pass went over many, many switchbacks, but the true marvel of engineering was the railroad that snaked its way through the same canyon. It had many more tunnels and bridges. I even saw a train chugging up the slope. The railway also went over the same 5000 m pass.

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    The railroad going high up to the pass

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    It was cold at the pass


    There is clearly a lot of mining activity in this region of the Andes. Quite a few of the towns along the road were there to support the mining industry. All I could think while riding through these towns was being sorry for the people who lived there in that harsh climate.

    Around 2 PM I was in Juniin – the place where Peruvian independence was won, or something along those lines. There was a big battle right there where Spaniards were defeated. The town itself looked uninviting, on a high wind-swept plain, cold and dusty, so I only fueled up and continued on. The gas attendant told me that Huanuco is at a much lower elevation and therefore warmer. That was enough of me to ride over the cold Andean plateau and finally start dropping down. It's just amazing what a difference 5-6 thousand feel in elevation can make.

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    Monument to the battle of Junin

    I arrived into Huanuco in late afternoon. I checked out a few hotels, walked around the main plaza and then went to my 3-day-old hotel (I love when I find brand-new hotels). There is nothing to see or do in Huanuco but it's so pleasantly warm with blue skies and sun. Apparently that's all I need to be happy.

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    Huanuco - haze capital of Peru

    Day 279 – Burn baby, burn

    The road out of Huanuco at first climbed up. I had to put my many layers on again. It crested at a tunnel at around 3000m. Then it was a steady slide down to the tropical lowlands. Before I hit town of Tingo Maria, I passed through a picturesque canyon, actually a national park. It was very beautiful, but I didn't stop to take any pictures because the air was filled with smoke from burning fires. It seems that that whole Amazon region is filled with this haze. I remember the Brazilian side being such and it was no different.

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    Tuk-tuk parade

    After Tingo Maria, I headed towards Pucallpa. I knew that protesters blocked the road and that I would not be able to go all the way. I managed to ride for about 50 km from Tingo Maria on a beautiful, recently paved road before I hit blockades.

    I returned back and went north, towards Tarapoto. I rode on fairly good, paved road with some sections under construction to town of Tocachin. After I ate lunch, it was already 3 PM. Ahead of me there were about 200 km of dirt roads. I decided to check out local lodging options. Hotel Espana looked good and when they said they had internet, I was convinced to stay there.

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    I had to try this new fruit. There is a whole book on fruits from the Amazon


    The town itself was yet another nothing-ever-happens place. But I managed to kill the afternoon cruising internet and replying to emails. In the evening, when the heat subsided, the town came to life. It was particularly lively around the main plaza. I watched children play around and talked to some
    locals.

    It's just too bad that millions of acres of land are being burnt. The scenery was very beautiful, but it's difficult to enjoy it while gasping for air. Taking pictures was out question too since the visibility was attrocious.

    Day 280 – Per aspera ad astra

    I started my dusty ride well before 7 AM. The road started off with very rough surface, but then it got slightly better. Luckily there was not much traffic on this road. A few trucks left me in dust clouds, but I was prepared for much worse. Scenery in some parts was very beautiful - morning fog lifting off a quiet river snaking its way through a jungle.

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    Early morning fog

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    Jungle ride

    Around 11 AM, 110 miles from Tocachin I finally hit a new pavement. This was a pleasant surprise as my map indicated that I would have to ride for another 40 miles to the beginning of a paved road. There is a lot of construction going on in Peru. In a few years, most major roads will be paved.

    I arrived in Tarapoto in early afternoon and had a lunch there. I was surprised by the number of motorcycle shops with Pirelli and Metzeler tires on sale. There was more selection than anywhere else I've been so far. The best part was the price. They were dirt cheap – $50 for just about any tire. Too bad I had already had my rear tire changed in Lima. My front one needs to be replaced badly, but I'm getting rid of this bike in matter of days and I'm too cheap to put more money into it.

    The best part of the day was riding the road from Tarapoto to Yurimaguas, the jump off point for river travel to Iquitos and further on to Brazil. The road started climbing up into lush, jungle-covered mountains. There were some waterfalls along the road too. The haze spoiled views a bit, but it was still one of the best rides of the trip. Once I crossed a pass, the road snaked its way down the other side for miles. It went through a deep canyon in places offering great views of the jungle on the other side.

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    If only there were a road to Manaus...


    Eventually the road flattened and it was a typical undulating-hills scenery of the Amazon region. After another hour of riding, I arrived in Yurimaguas. It was steamy hot, just the way daddy likes. I circled the town a few times looking for a hotel. At the end, I resorted to my guidebook and went for the hotel they recommended.

    I sat by the river for a few hours, contemplating where I was, where I had been and where I was going next. This was really the last foray into Amazon for me and I wanted to savor the moment.

    Day 281 – Jungles, high passes and deep canyons

    I rode back to Tarapoto and spent some more time in the picturesque section of the road. After that I continued west towards the coast through not-so-interesting farmlands. About 200 km from Yurimaguas, the road started climbing up jungle-covered mountains again. Soon, I was high enough to have to put on more clothes. This road is definitely one of the best I've ridden on the trip. I only wish I came here a few weeks earlier, before all the smoke season started.

    Not only were Yurimaguas and Tarapoto full of motorcycle shops offering dual-sport tires at cheap prices, but the small villages all along the road as well. Still, I refrained from getting a new front tire. I regretted this decision only a few hundred kilometers later when I took a better look at my completely worn-out front tire.

    Finally, I had to get off the main road and head south towards Chachapoyas on a beautiful newly paved road. It went through a beautiful canyon cut by a gushing, clear-water river. Like all other places of interest, Chachapoyas had to be high up in the mountains. While it was nice and warm down in the canyon, by the time I reached Chachapoyas, I was at about 3200m and it was chilly. I found a nice hotel on the main plaza with indoor parking. I was coming down with a cold, so I went to bed early to get some rest.

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    Beautiful new road to Chachapoyas

    Day 282 – Chachapoyas

    Some people told me about the third highest waterfall in the world being close by. So I decided to go and visit it. It took me about an hour of riding and two hours of hiking to get to it. It was in a picturesque setting and despite dry season, it was flowing. Again, too bad for all the haze. After an hour of hanging around, I hiked back.

    At this point I really didn't like my bald front tire. I had about 200 miles of dirt ahead of me and I was worried that the tire wouldn't survive it. So I went back to nearby town to look for a new tire. They didn't have any, but they said another town, 80 km away would have it. So I backtracked some more. Luckily, I was able to find a knobby tire, cheap one. I had it changed for less than a dollar. I can't believe I paid $12 to have rear tire changed in Lima. I knew the price was way too high, but I felt embarrassed to leave the shop and look for cheaper one – live and learn.

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    Gocta falls, supposedly the third highest in the world. Too bad for the haze

    Armed with a new tire, I felt invincible. I didn't have to worry about tire exploding every time I enter a turn. At first it felt little weird to ride pronounced knobbies on asphalt, but when I hit the dirt, it felt so good. As much as I hated getting a new tire for a bike that I would get rid of in two weeks, my life was worth more than the tire.

    Day 283 – Fortress of Kuelap

    I left Chachapoyas shortly after 7 AM. I headed south on a firm dirt road towards Kuelap – a pre-Colombian fortress. I had to take a very scenic, 40 km detour from the main road. I spent about an hour walking around the site and then headed back to the main road. I still had some 300 km of dirt riding ahead of me.

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    People who built this Kuelap fortress were conquered by the Inkas shortly before the arrival of Spaniards

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    All the houses inside the fort were round

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    The long, winding road to Kuelap

    First few hours were nothing special. The road went along a river at the bottom of a canyon. However, once I reached the end of the canyon, I started climbing up and up to about 3600m. It was a single lane, hard-packed, dirt road with spectacular drop-offs along the way. The best part was almost complete solitude. I saw only 2-3 other vehicles. Even I could enjoy dirt roads like this one. Once I crossed the pass, mountains on the other side were even steeper and the road more spectacular. Vince, another ADVrider had recommended me this route, but I didn't know it would be this spectacular. I spent almost two hours going down without a single section of the road going up. I thought it was pretty amazing how people built this road at all.

    Around 4 PM I reached the bottom of the canyon and river Maranon, a precursor of Rio Amazonas. I had plenty of time to ride another 60 km to Celendin. However, it was so hot at the bottom of the canyon that I just couldn't leave it. So I found a secluded spot by the river, pitched my tent and just enjoyed the heat. I went to sleep while listening to gushing river, birds and insects.

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    My camping spot by Rio Maranon

    Day 284 – Norther coast

    I woke up at dawn and got ready for a long ride ahead of me. I hated leaving this comfortable place as I knew I would soon be cold again.

    Very long switchbacks started right from the bottom of the canyon. I could see them going up for miles and miles. Again, there was virtually no traffic on this road. I passed by a few small villages and wondered again how people here like to have houses perched high up the mountains and not along the river valleys. Even though I reached the pass around 9 AM, it was still freezing. From there, I could see Celendin just a little lower in a high valley.

    The town was just waking up and most restaurants were still closed. I just refueled and got some chocolate for breakfast. I rode another two hours before I hit the pavement. I enjoyed this dirt road and I'm glad I followed Vincent's recommendation. It was probably the best dirt road I've ridden on this trip – nice find Vince!

    I didn't find Cajamarca any more appealing than in April when I was there the first time, so I pushed on. I had about 200 km of beautiful, newly paved road to the coast. I had a lunch in one of the road-side restaurants and continued on. I could feel temperature going up as I descended. However, some 50 miles from the coast, it suddenly got cold again, this time due to coastal air.

    Once on Panamericana, I had ride for another 110 km to the surfing village of Huanchaco. Even though I was at the sea level, close to the Equator, it was cold. There was strong on-shore wind, perpendicular to my direction of travel. So I suffered for another hour before reaching Huanchaco. I was in this village in April, during high season. I remember it being full of people and having a hard time finding accommodation. This time around, most places were closed for the season and the ones that were open were virtually empty and very cheap – I loved it!

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    Back to Huachaco

    Day 285 – R&R in Huanchaco

    I had planned on continuing to Huaraz, but I really enjoyed the relaxed atmosphere and decided to stay for one more day. Besides, I was still nursing my cold from a few days earlier. There wasn't much to do besides cruising internet, eating, walking by and staring at the ocean.

    Day 286 – Canyon del Pato, once again

    After uncomfortable ride along the ocean (cold and foggy) I finally turned inland. The road wasn't particularly scenic, but much better than the monotone desert along the coast. I didn't bother looking at the map or asking people, so I ended up going to the end of the paved road. As it turns out, I went about 100 past my turn off point. Backtracking actually didn't bother me since I had enough time. I also got the best offer for the bike up to that point.

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    Drivers do crazy stuff and get away with it (no need to pay for towing service either :lol3 )


    After finding the right dirt road, I continued towards Caraz. The traffic wasn't too bad, so I enjoyed the ride. It turned out to be longer than I expected, so I arrived into Caraz just before the sunset. This time I put a bit more effort into finding a comfortable place. Los Pinos Lodge fit the bill. While parking, I noticed that my rear tire was flat. I was so glad that it didn't happen in the canyon as I was tired, it was late in the day and I was not in the mood to wrestle with the bead.

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    A waterfall in Canyon del Pato

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    And another waterfall on the other side

    Day 287 – Bidding war

    I took it easy and went to a nearby vulcanizadora after breakfast. The guy didn't have pneumatic tools to remove the bead, but luckily he had some vises. The tube wasn't punctured, but the patch that I had placed in Bolivia finally weakened the surrounding rubber and a leak developed.

    I mentioned that the bike was for sale and the shop owner made an offer. Another customer came to have his flat tire fixed and he was interested in buying prized KLR too. He made an offer I was more than happy to accept.

    With the fixed tire, I offered to take him for a test ride up into the mountains. I visited Lago Paron in April, but I didn't mind going there again since the scenery is spectacular. We hiked around the lake a bit, had some snacks and returned back to Caraz. He was sold on KLR.

    Back at my lodge, the owner too, made an excellent offer. Now I felt bad for having only one KLR to sell. They would go here like hot cakes.

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    Laguna Paron

    Day 288 – Huaraz and old friends

    I wanted to go to Huaraz to check for guides as they are much cheaper than in Caraz. While walking around I saw some people looking at my bike. After a while I realized that they were the French couple I met in Lima. We had lunch together and planned to ride together the following day.

    On the way back to Caraz, I had a flat tire again. Can this be happening to me? I suspected that it was poor patching job the day before. So I went back to the same store and sure enough, there was a leak at the same place. So we put a newer tube in and everything was fine again. That tiny metal splinter that I got in Bolivia cost me four flat tires. Had I had a super heavy duty tube, I would have made the whole trip without a single puncture.

    Day 289 – Laguna Llanganuco

    I've been to this lake and the pass above in April too, but I loved the area and wanted to visit it again. As it turns out, despite the rainy season, I had better weather in April. Not only were the snowy peaks engulfed in clouds, but there was a lot of haze, even at almost 5000m. I guess this is not rainy or dry, just bad season to come to Cordillera Blanca.

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    Lago Llanganuco

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    Going up to the pass again


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    Near the pass (this is only half of the switchbacks)

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    I parked the bike at the pass and hiked around for a few hours

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    Huascaran, the highest peak in Peru, at sunset


    Day 290-293 – El fin

    I spent these four days running around different notaries, government offices and even had to ride bike back to Lima. As it turns out, it's impossible to pay custom duties inside the country. The bike would have to be taken out of the country over a land border (airport or maritime border is not good enough) and taken back in with an importation permit. Since neither I nor the buyer was interested in another 3000 of riding, we settled on a bit lower price and they would deal with problems any way they can.

    In a way, I learned about Peru, people and customs more in those few days than in two months that I had spent in this country cumulative. I saw how people interact, behave, treat each other and even how they think. I was actually impressed how kind and nice some of the government workers were. There are many cultural aspects that I still have hard time grasping, but I enjoyed observing what was going one around me.

    I also liked the buying family. The old man, grandfather, has many kids and countless grandchildren. He is 77 years old and has bad knees, but he still works hard. He wakes up every morning at 5 AM to work in the field, then goes to the market to sell goods. Three of his kids have vans for transportation. They actually make very good money. The cars themselves cost about 40k USD each, but they are a great way of making money. The most interesting part is that despite being old, the grandpa controls everything. He is the owner of all cars, all houses and all the property. He has a hard time walking, but didn't mind going around government offices with us to make sure everything is right (and in his name). When I asked his grandson why doesn't he just stay home and we take care of papers, the reply was simple – distrust. From what I have seen, he runs his huge family very tightly and they are all doing well financially. Needless to say, when he or his wife enter a room, people are jumping up to give them their seats. The old man is really wise.

    [​IMG]
    My new friends in Caras

    [​IMG]
    The family who bought my bike. The wise, old guy's on the right




    [​IMG]
    That's all folks!
  14. pdedse

    pdedse paraelamigosincero

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,046
    Not taking anything away from the natural beauty captured in your latest post, but the photo of this child is off the charts.

    Sad that there will be no more, but truly thankful for an outstanding feast of photos and commentary! Que te vaya bien...
  15. WOXOF

    WOXOF Just wander'n

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2008
    Oddometer:
    706
    Location:
    Ada, MI
    Great RR Igor. I thoroughly enjoy it.

    :beer
  16. crashmaster

    crashmaster ow, my balls!

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,566
    Location:
    Alaska
    :clap:clap:clap :cry:cry:cry

    Awesome journey, sad that its over. Igor, mi amigo, this is a top notch ride report! I only wish I was so diligent in mine. I'm such a slacker. I saw several outstanding photos in this last post that I drove right by and figured, huh, maybe I should have stopped for a picture? I'm such a dumbass. :D

    However, there is one glaring flaw in your entire report. You post in yellow. Yellow is Suzuki. green is the Kawasaki color. So in light of that, you might have to do the entire ride over again to get it right. :rofl

    Its a good thing that this little obstacle didnt get you on the road from Cajamarca to Huanchaco........

    <object height="362" width="640">


    <embed src="https://cdn.smugmug.com/ria/ShizVidz-2010071401.swf" flashvars="s=ZT0xJmk9OTQ5NzQ4ODMxJms9TUwyTWEmYT0xMjQ0MzgwNF9CQkFFciZ1PWNyYXNobWFzdGVy" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" height="362" width="640"></object>

    You would think after a year in Latin America that I wouldnt come up on something like that at over 70 mph? The KTM suspension saved my ass, again......

    Next bike for you.............. KTM 690 Enduro. :thumb If you think the KLR is a good performer......... you need to go ride a 690.:rofl

    hasta luego amigo, Vince
  17. evermore

    evermore Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2010
    Oddometer:
    757
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    thanks so much for your detailed report. You have no idea how useful these are to the ones following you.

    I'm just bummed I wont run into you in South America, I'll be having my own Darien Gap sailing adventure in a few days.

    Michael
  18. GastonUSAChile

    GastonUSAChile Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 28, 2008
    Oddometer:
    789
    Location:
    Miami,USA
    Well it looks that this is the end of a fairy tale. After talking with Igor this morning over Skype, many feelings come to our soul as the ocean and waves after a long gale seas.
    To say it all in short words is difficult , so many good times following the thread, being thankful for what Igor did showing along his adventure and the greatest thing about all is gaining a truly friend like family above all.

    Or I am a dreamer or the world offer us another side that is not there, you cultivate it and in the giving, you gain a soul forever. That is wonderful.

    We humans I think we are a one big family, capable of joint mutual power to accomplish new things. We are just shy of others that's all.

    I have red a wonderful journey, I've learned from him, I helped a little and I made a wonderful man as a friend. Hopefully tomorrow a new adventure, may be different than this one we could make it together. Thanks Igor, we didn't pay for this adventure, but we 'll pay you with friendship.

    I am putting this pic right here because bring back a lot of memories to me and my wife .
    When we went to Huanchaco, to see the famous and biggest clay city ruins in the world "Chan-Chan", I was flat by this floating devices. I must confess that I am big fun of unique boat things. So, I start walking along the seawall boulevard and I ask them who was the best builder of such vessels. "caballitos de totora" (papirus horses). Most of the people pointed one man, Mr.Huamanchu......something. So he came to me and told that he was building the best of the best for his son. Smiling, I ask him, can I buy that one for me?....how long would it take to be ready? blabla bla, he said, tomorrow you will have it, upsss that fast!!!, how much ? ......$85 bucks hahahahaaha ...please!!! just put it on my car roof, we are leaving right away!!!
    Then, we were driving 500 kms. all the way to Lima in a Ford Fiesta with this big thing on the roof. Everybody was curious and big mouth open. Next thing the vessel was at the airport walking trough the ramp toward the airplane belly like a Moai in Easter island. People so acustomize to this type of boat was skeptical of seeing this vessel going to another country in a airplane. You cannot imaging the amount of gathering people at the Miami airport looking this stuff, they couldn't believe what their eyes were looking at...........

    Fisherman ride these vessels surfing on the waves using bamboos as paddles. Quite unique . Every year they ship a similar vessel, the size of a ship made exactly the same to venerate a saint for a good fishing year. They leave the horses stnading to drain the water hold by the totora fiber that swallow the water to became a heavy stable vessel. On top of that is a big and unique setting seeing all this boats standing against the pacific ocean at sunset. ASK IGOR!!

    for one strange reason, Egyptians never came here but I think the message got through, because the same material and kind of same design is used in the Nile river.

    Attached Files:

  19. crashmaster

    crashmaster ow, my balls!

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,566
    Location:
    Alaska
    There is some serious front page stuff in the last post Igor!!!!

    Gaston: Holy crap! You brought one of the reed boats to Miami!!!?

    very cool!
  20. Freedom Rider

    Freedom Rider Adventurer

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2008
    Oddometer:
    68
    Location:
    Canmore Canadian Rockies
    Dear Igor

    My name is Michael and I have been following your blog with great interest for the passed 8 month's devouring each new thread , I have enjoyed the fantastic photo's and descriptions of your journey and the reason is for the passed two and a half years I have been planning my own trip , well I have already left Canmore Canada as of the 1st of Aug for a one year trip but I have a twist I am riding with my wife and son all on DR 650's which I modified myself , actually they learned to ride for this trip , we are now in Oaxaca and heading to the coast and on to San Cristobal.
    My question to you is I also have a blog on ADVRider under the name Freedom Rider and titled Family Quest To South America I like very much how you set up your blog having written descriptions between photo's , to this day I cannot figure out how you are doing this , at the moment I am hosting with Smugmug and have a link on my first thread so friend's and relatives can follow , I would appreciate any help regarding this.

    Sincerely
    Freedom Rider