You Will Be Showered With Good Luck . . .

Discussion in 'Some Assembly Required' started by theofam, Mar 11, 2020.

  1. theofam

    theofam Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2009
    Oddometer:
    900
    Location:
    Denver
    Making room in my wallet this morning, I pulled this out:

    Fortune.jpg

    Today, I indeed followed in my dad's good luck. A friend of his tried to sell him a KLR for over a year. Mostly due to garage space, my dad (aka DonnyO) passed on the opportunity. Tired of seeing it in the garage, his buddy then told him he would GIVE him the KLR. I had a spot in my garage . . . and . . . BINGO!

    KLR Papa.jpg

    It's a 2005 with 17K on the clock - even came with a 6.6-gallon IMS tank! According to DonnyO, if you wiggle the handlebars to and fro three times and kick the battery followed by promptly pressing the start button, it'll come to life. We'll see. First things are a battery, front tire, front brake pads, a crush washer for the weeping front caliper's banjo bolt, and some electrical troubleshooting.

    Gotta love the Gen 1s! DonnyO doesn't know I've named it Pinky.
    KLR Pinky Right.jpg

    When DonnyO picked up the KLR last week, he told me his buddy had a second KLR he wanted to sell for $500. I couldn't spit out my food fast enough to say, "SOLD!" So, load up the dog, drag the trailer north an hour, and I'm now the proud owner of a 2009 black beauty.

    KLR Cobra.jpg

    DonnyO is more a fan of the stock 2005 tank with shrouds, so the IMS tank is going on mine. It's a black tank and will look great on the '09. Given the wide flare of the tank, I'm naming mine Cobra.

    KLR Cobra Right.jpg

    I've first got to get the 690 prepped for an upcoming trip, but Pinky and Cobra are on deck! The KLR lost out to my decision in 2013 to buy a DR650 (later replaced by the 690), but I've always had an interest in one day owning one. So, here goes. I'll use this thread to keep an account of getting these two on the road. It'll also be a chance for me to ask questions of the KLRista.

    May you, too, be showered with good luck!
    #1
  2. theofam

    theofam Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2009
    Oddometer:
    900
    Location:
    Denver
    Time for an update. After research, the IMS 6.6 gallon tank on Pinky doesn't fit a Gen 2 without work on the radiator and modifying the fan bracket. Even then, it's very tight. So, a decision was made. DonnyO will keep the IMS tank on Pinky. Once he learned he could run it without needing crash bars, thereby allowing him to spend dough on other parts, it was a go!

    So, the name Cobra no longer fits, as my scoot won't have the flared back of the IMS. He is now Moose.

    I've decided to work on Moose first. As my first KLR, I'd rather make mistakes on mine before tackling DonnyO's.

    Ever since I first got turned on to the KLR years ago, I realized I couldn't ride one not knowing if the original doohickey had cracked or accompanying spring turned itself into shrapnel. After a shopping spree at Eagle Mike, I had a doohickey and necessary tools. Turned out the spring was in good shape.

    KLR Doo Spring.jpg

    The doo was on and looking good. Eagle Mike even answered an email on a Saturday and saved my weekend!

    Doohickey.jpg

    All buttoned up, I moved on to remove the janky SuperTrapp hanging loosely off a carriage bolt.

    Supertrapp.jpg

    I also pulled the Dirt Racks pannier racks in au natural finish. They'll either get spray bombed black or powder coated.

    DirtRacks.jpg

    Something had been pestering me. As mentioned in the initial post, Pinky's PO would wiggle the handlebars, kick the battery and quickly hit the go button to bring Pinky to life. The night before, I noticed the positive battery cable screw was a bit loose. So, with wire brush and a bit of sandpaper, I took to cleaning up all the negative and positive contacts at the battery. After tightening everything back up, I turned on the gas, closed the choke, hit the go button and Pinky immediately came to life - WOOHOO!

    Pinky Running.jpg

    Back to Moose, I noticed the vent line had cracked and wasn't attached - easy fix.

    Tank Vent Cracked.jpg

    I ended up using rubbing compound on the tank followed by some wax. Turned out pretty nice!

    Upgraded the subframe bolts in one final act as the sun fell.

    Subframe Bolts.jpg

    More next time. . .
    #2
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  3. Beezer

    Beezer Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2004
    Oddometer:
    9,625
    Location:
    Anchorage, formerly Spenard (hub of the universe)
    I've had a few... bought an '05 new. oil level in the forks is critical. book says to collapse the forks, pull the springs and add oil until 190mm from the top. I used to run KLR tech days and checked dozens of bikes and none had even that much unless the owner did the work. anything less is a pogo stick and causes wobbly handling at highway speeds. people cut the fender, took off the hand guards, the windshield, etc to compensate but none of that matters if you get enough oil in the forks. so.... 10 wt oil or ATF, collapse the fork, no springs, 170mm from the top is a good place to start. more oil, less bounce. you can add 10-15 psi air to trim it. I was running the oil level at 140mm, with no (pressurised) air, and levels as high as 100mm.

    a fork brace is nice & gives you a chance to lower the front fender (and replace with a UFO or similar). turn the fork boots around so the holes are in the back, fill in the most forward ones with black RTV. this helps keep spuzz out of the seal area.

    when the front wheel is off, watch how it fits back on. the speedo drive needs to be aligned, when the rear wheel is off there is a spacer between the cush drive hub and the wheel hub. it has a tendency to fall out and then the wheel and hub grind and other bad stuff happens,

    and speaking of oil level... engine oil is critical too. check it every time you fuel up, at least until you know what it will do. low oil will wreck the cylinder head.

    I can answer questions if you have any.
    #3
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  4. theofam

    theofam Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2009
    Oddometer:
    900
    Location:
    Denver
    On to today - it was . . . challenging.

    My goal for the day was to change the carb to a KLX needle, drop the main jet to a 138 and upgrade the carb screws to hex-head bolts. I even got to use one of DonnyO's tricks recalled from my childhood of stuffing a pencil in the fuel line once disconnected from the tank.

    Pencil Carb.jpg

    The carb mods went as planned. Er, wait. Did he say 138 for a main jet?! Yep! Moose will be living at 8,800 feet, so I used Eagle Mike's recommendation for high altitude. The first challenge of the day showed itself. I had a tough time drilling out the welch plug to upgrade to the Eagle Mike idle screw. It might've been made of diamond, but my butter-soft drill bit eventually drilled it out. The carb bowl had a bit of junk in it, but carb cleaner made everything right again.

    Carb Bowl.jpg

    Moose had been smelling rich the last couple start efforts. The old main jet was a 145, which is too big for this elevation. The spark plug showed evidence.

    Fouled Plug.jpg

    Challenge Deux. A couple days ago I tried to charge Moose' battery with its installed tender pigtail, but it didn't work. I figured the tender pigtail was faulty, because alligator clips worked the next day. So, off with the negative battery bol . . . DOH!

    Battery Bolt.jpg

    It was either dissimilar metal that had seized or was installed by a gorilla, but it sheared right off. Remember my collection of butter-soft drill bits? I couldn't get into the bolt to even attempt the easy out. Guess I'll add a battery to the budget.

    Challenge - third time's a charm. The PO figured Moose's battery would stay attached because it had cables attached to it. It was missing both the battery cover and the lower battery stay, which had sheared off. There's just a wee little piece remaining, but guess what you gotta do to get it out?!

    Battery Compartment.jpg

    First, you've got to get real good at deciphering Sumitomo secret levers to release crusty electrical connections.

    Tough Connector.jpg

    Then, you have to undo work done the prior day to upgrade subframe bolts. The result?

    Subframe Off.jpg

    Followed by an air box-in-hand happy dance!

    Airbox Out.jpg

    When I pulled off the air filter several days ago, it wasn't oiled. That means crud on the downhill side of the air box. Bummer.

    Airbox Crud.jpg

    Just when the day couldn't get any better, Challenge Quattro.

    Engine Mount Crack.jpg

    The rear engine mount is cracked on the left side of the bike. DANGIT! My daughter asked me how big of a deal it is on a scale of 1-10. 10. Not sure how I'm going to handle this one. I'd prefer not to pull the engine and take it somewhere. I do plan on pulling the swingarm to lube it, at which point, with the subframe also removed, access would be good if I can find a mobile welder to roll up the driveway to fix it. What say you, assemblers?
    #4
  5. Chad M

    Chad M A full head of air.

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,165
    Location:
    N49, W4
    Pull the engine, clean it very well and let a pro weld in on his bench. I guarantee it will be cheaper and better all the way around.
    #5
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  6. r60man

    r60man Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2013
    Oddometer:
    2,023
    Location:
    Centralish PA
    Yep, I would yank that puppy out of there. Makes the job very simple.
    #6
  7. theofam

    theofam Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2009
    Oddometer:
    900
    Location:
    Denver
    I was tossing and turning from 3:30-6:00am. I eventually came to your same assessment of the situation. So, out it comes! Thanks for weighing in.
    #7
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  8. r60man

    r60man Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2013
    Oddometer:
    2,023
    Location:
    Centralish PA
    Get a good nights sleep!
    #8
  9. theofam

    theofam Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2009
    Oddometer:
    900
    Location:
    Denver
    Exactly! I value my zzzzzs too much to leave the crack unresolved!
    #9
  10. theofam

    theofam Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2009
    Oddometer:
    900
    Location:
    Denver
    70A87338-4887-474E-879D-053B3966BC50.jpeg An afternoon’s disconnecting this and unbolting that has me nearly ready to remove the engine. I’m stuck, though. Above the engine to the left of the tank-mounting puck sits a white, three-wire connector for the crankshaft position sensor and neutral switch. I can’t figure out how to get it apart. Outside of that, front and rear engine mounts are the only thing keeping it from being removed. I found a guy who welds aluminum in town. He is retiring and not taking on new work, but I used my Irish charm on him (read pleaded) and I drop the engine off in two days!
    #10
  11. theofam

    theofam Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2009
    Oddometer:
    900
    Location:
    Denver
    0FCA2003-B5A8-483B-803C-6581453BDF33.jpeg 0D189E6B-816D-4333-A9F3-C33A6267843A.jpeg The engine is out. Here is the broken piece on the rear mount. Dropping it off tomorrow to find out if it can be fixed.
    #11
  12. theofam

    theofam Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2009
    Oddometer:
    900
    Location:
    Denver
    A week of staying at home has transpired. Instead of huddling around the TV, I've been chugging away out in the garage.

    Pulled the lever. I can't say the bearings were greased. More like oiled - very thin. After cleaning them, I repacked them with some Bel Ray waterproof grease.
    Lever.jpg

    The swingarm bolt was dry as a bone.
    Swingarm Bolt Rusty.jpg

    Since I've already ordered way more parts than I initially thought I'd need, I'm salvaging what I can with what I've got. So, out came the 120 grit (way too aggressive), followed by 320, 600, 1000 wet, and 1500 wet finished off with Mother's. It may not look it in the photo, but it's now baby-butt smooth.
    Swingarm Bolt Clean.jpg

    The rear wheel was gross, but the bearings are in good shape. They were repacked, too.
    Sprocket Dirty.jpg

    Then it was on to 0000 steel wool on the spokes and cleaning the wheel with diluted Simple Green (should have bought stock in the product before starting this project).
    Rear Wheel Detail.jpg

    Cleaned up the rear brake system.
    Rear Brake Cleaning.jpg

    So, a good portion of Moose's rebuild costs are in plastics - like 25-30% - and I have only bought some of them. Turns out the cowling/fairing is tough to find used. Other than the windshield, there isn't a piece I can use up front. So, off it came, then I detailed this dusty mess.
    Instrument Panel.jpg

    Wrapped up the week by shaving and giving myself a haircut.
    Haircut.jpg
    #12
  13. theofam

    theofam Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2009
    Oddometer:
    900
    Location:
    Denver
    Mike called and let me know the engine was ready.

    A few posts ago, I recapped a multi-challenge day. One challenge was my inability to drill out a snapped bolt on my battery's negative terminal. I had two ideas. Not all ideas are good.

    Idea #1: "Hey, Mike, can you weld a nut atop the broken off negative bolt, or could that cause the battery to explode?" Mike: "I'm leaning toward explode."

    Idea #2: "Can I bring the battery down and see if you can drill it out on your drill press?" Mike: "Sure. I'll put it on the mill."

    So, off I went.

    Here's Mike working on the battery. It was a pesky bolt that apparently had been a bit too long, bottomed on the battery and flared or embedded itself. After 30-40 minutes between the mill and sundry tools, the bolt was out, the battery retapped, and ready to breathe life into Moose!
    Mike at Mill.jpg

    Mike only took on my project because he loves motorcycles. He's got great stories, and, fortunately for him, is wrapping up customer jobs by the end of this month in order to retire. I'm bummed, because the world loses another craftsman. Check out this fix! I withheld my disbelief when Mike told me the price. $40.
    Engine Welded.jpg

    Trying to minimize errands, I'm using what I've got in the garage. When I restored my Honda . . .
    Paddy.jpg

    I used Dupli Color Cast Aluminum on the engine, and I had some left over. Thus far, I've read Dupli Color Graphite Silver is a very close match to the KLR's 2008-? engine. The color can't be that far off, can it? Um,
    Engine Painted.jpg

    Oh, well. It's painted and is in an area folks won't easily see. I sanded surface rust off the pannier racks and primed, painted and cleared them.
    Dirt Racks Painted.jpg

    All parts have been cleaned. Other than rebuilding suspension, Moose is ready for reassembly.
    #13
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  14. theofam

    theofam Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2009
    Oddometer:
    900
    Location:
    Denver
    A bit of a belt & suspenders approach with the lift/lift combo.
    Frame Jack.jpg

    Dropped the engine in. Engine mounts were torqued before I realized I hadn't checked the valves while on the workbench. Got to do that soon. Engine Installed.jpg

    I detailed the swingarm and cleaned and lubed its bearings last week. It's installed.
    Suspension Mounted.jpg

    Fresh sprockets are fun!
    New Sprocket.jpg

    The chain sent was 102 links. Got to send it back and get a 106.
    Chain On.jpg

    More to come . . .
    #14
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  15. theofam

    theofam Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2009
    Oddometer:
    900
    Location:
    Denver
    I was dreading rebuilding the shock, as I had never done it before; and, I'm not sure I've the right spring rate. Rocky Mountain ATV has an instructive video rebuilding the KLR shock, so I used it throughout the process. I let out air pressure, and it instead shot this $h1t across the garage.
    Shock Foam.jpg

    It was foamy. Seemed mostly water with a trace of oil. One of the new spring compressors twisted - not impressed.
    Spring Compressor Racked.jpg

    Got a new shock bumper.
    Shock Bumper.jpg

    And an All Balls seal. Almost forgot I had ordered the magic bullet to keep the seal from tearing upon install. Yep, this is exactly how I installed it. For those of you who have done this, or know anything about shocks, you already know what I did wrong.
    Shock Seal.jpg

    Got the entire thing buttoned up and realized I had left this off.
    Shock Cap Forgotten.jpg

    So, I tore it back down (went a lot quicker the second time) and got it all ready for nitrogen. Not sure a shop will be able to do that for awhile.
    Shock Finished.jpg
    #15
  16. Chad M

    Chad M A full head of air.

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,165
    Location:
    N49, W4
    That repair turned out great! I like your attention to detail, the old KLR is going to look pretty fresh when you’re done.
    #16
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  17. MOTOS and TACOS

    MOTOS and TACOS Adventurer

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2012
    Oddometer:
    36
    Its pretty neat that you and I are doing almost the exact same project at the same time! Great job getting everything cleaned up and looking nice. The weld repair looks awesome.
    #17
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  18. theofam

    theofam Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2009
    Oddometer:
    900
    Location:
    Denver
    @MOTOS and TACOS - your KLR turned out exceptional! Moose won't be finished at the same level, but he'll still be awesome! Here's the latest:

    Figured the stock rubber foot pegs would be slick as owl snot, so I replaced them with these that should essentially weld my boots to the bike.
    Footpegs.jpg

    I geek out over a clean bike. Something about clear fluids get me in the mood, too.
    Brake Bled.jpg

    @MOTOS and TACOS killed it with the rejuvenation of his Gen 1 pink-to-red plastics. He was super helpful, and patient, in answering my questions. My right side cover started out like this:
    Side Cover Right Scratched.jpg

    Ended up like this, along with the scratched up left side cover (the plastics on this bike tip to tail are trashed).
    Sidecovers Together.jpg

    The left had very deep gouges, but it turned out decent.
    Sidecover Left Finished.jpg

    Did my first-ever valve shim adjustment. Made me miss my DR650's ease of adjustment when it comes to valves.
    Valve Job.jpg

    The rear wheel had a bit too much drive line lash. The cush hub damper was a bit past its prime. It was replaced with this one - problem solved!
    Hub Damper.jpg

    Ready to install airbox in the subframe, I realized I hadn't ordered a part with a broken bolt stuck in it. Turned out it was a 10-day wait to order a new one. So, back out to the workbench to figure out how to salvage my timeline. This booger required cutting a flat-tip notch in the broken bolt followed by an impact driver to get it out.
    Battery Brace Bracket.jpg

    With the subframe reinstalled, it was a bunch of bolting on parts I had cleaned a few weeks ago. Moose started looking like a bike again!
    Largely Reassembled.jpg

    But, I was working stern to bow, and pretty soon more disassembly was happening. Turns out this dude's got a voracious appetite for maps.
    Front Brake Travels.jpg

    Detailed the front wheel, and now the forks are anxiously awaiting a box of goodies from Cogent. They're excited to get DDCs, new springs and fresh oil.
    Forks Out.jpg

    Here's Moose in his current state.
    Moose No Forks.jpg
    #18
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  19. B10Dave

    B10Dave Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2012
    Oddometer:
    2,156
    Location:
    Kingsmill Corner Ont.
    Theofam; great attention to detail. Bike will be 100% in the mechanics and very good in the cosmetics. A little tip for you if I may? When I get a new chain I usually always get a 110 link or slightly longer. Strange but the longer chains from my regular supplier are usually less money than 102 or 106 link and you can just remove the extra links easily. Carry on with this most excellent project.
    #19
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  20. theofam

    theofam Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2009
    Oddometer:
    900
    Location:
    Denver
    DC5192AC-EC23-447E-9D01-8BD3C84AC4A8.jpeg B10Dave, thanks for the tip on the chain. More money for other parts! I feel like I’m going backwards today!
    #20
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