Your favorite Macgyver moments\tricks

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by HaChayalBoded, Sep 21, 2008.

  1. kenstone

    kenstone worn out

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2013
    Oddometer:
    1,806
    Location:
    Boysee
    I have found that one strand of copper wire from a multi-strand electrical wire is small enough and readily available to clean jets.
    :D
    shupe and nzrian like this.
  2. Cyber;Bird

    Cyber;Bird Moto-Birder

    Joined:
    May 6, 2019
    Oddometer:
    10
    Location:
    Santiago, Chile
    Exactly 3 months after starting riding my first bike, I rode my first little-big-adventure to Farellones, Chile. First time seeing snow and being able to enjoy it! I parked the bike at the side of the road, found a "reliable stone" to avoid bike's side-stand to sink... I walked 10m far and crash! Turned back to see my first drop bike... and broken clutch. (stupid me stone)

    I didn't know how to ride a bike without it, and even if I knew, the road back it's a 40-turns hairpin! The town is empty when it's no ski season, but I found two men building a house, asked for help and with a small metal-bar and some magic, voilà!

    DSC_0174.jpg
    DSC_0176.jpg
    DSC_0177.jpg

    I was able to ride safe all those 40-turns hairpin back home! Only with some muscle pain in my hand.
    I have very happy memories of that day, although I was really distressed when that happened xD
  3. theothersean

    theothersean dirty boy

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2005
    Oddometer:
    1,572
    Location:
    middle of nowhere (central mass)
    A small pair of vice grips, and some safety wire or duct tape or zip ties in you’re jacket pocket can be used as a break leaver , Clutch lever , Shifter or brake pedal. Assuming you have enough of a nub to grab onto. You use the fastener material to keep the vice grips clamped shut. Can even carry it in carry on luggage on a plane if doing a fly and ride.
    But you got lucky with that repair. Nice !
  4. Disston

    Disston ShadeTreeExpert

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2009
    Oddometer:
    15,450
    Location:
    Silver Spring, Md
    That's a great story Cyber;Bird
  5. Grimreaper7

    Grimreaper7 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2011
    Oddometer:
    900
    Location:
    North East England
    Monday afternoon driving home in the works van, 40 odd miles from home in traffic on the York ring road, my gear lever suddenly went light and I realised I had lost the ability to change gear (was stuck in 2nd I think) , so managed to slip the clutch in order to get to a layby where I could call the recovery services.
    Van was still in warranty so the manufacturer assistance guy was dispatched to my aid.
    In the 90 minutes it took him to get to me, I had sussed the problem out and effected a repair.
    The gear linkage cable end joint had broken it's plastic rose joint bearing end and was popping off the gearbox actuator when moved through its range of motion. The repair man didn't have a replacement (says the whole gear cable assembly has to be changed as they don't just do replacement ends for them) so I left my MacGyver fix in place.
    Nothing that a few cable ties can't fix. It's done a few hundred miles so far and should last until next Friday when I can drop it in to the fleet garage to make a permanent repair.
    IMG_0360.JPG
    lnewqban, Bob_M and Effendi like this.
  6. Wentwest

    Wentwest How's that work?

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,660
    Location:
    Northern California
    Cable ties definitely belong in the Hall of Fame of emergency hack tools. Well done.
    X5-, KeithinSC and JensEskildsen like this.
  7. zap2504

    zap2504 Dave E.

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,250
    Location:
    Middletown, PA
    I've also used a single, longish, new wire strand from a wire brush held with a hemostat.
    datleeman likes this.
  8. MarcoSolo

    MarcoSolo Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 4, 2012
    Oddometer:
    52
    Location:
    53948
    I was trying to get a master link back together on an o-ring chain without a chain tool. Found I could massage it on in less than a minute with a pair of welder's vice grips - locking C clamps with the narrow contact points. One judicious rap on the clip and it was on. Saved $25-35 and a couple of days of waiting.
  9. ThrillSeeka

    ThrillSeeka Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 18, 2019
    Oddometer:
    74
    Location:
    Europa!
    Cutting food-graded silicone cooking molds into strips and then using the silicone strips to cushion a heat shield that was vibrating like mad. The silicone used in cooking molds can be used for oven cooking, so it holds up muffler heat while absorbing vibration like no other material I've used.

    Cost to replace the heat shield would have been $$$ and a lot of time

    VS

    The 2 bucks I used worth of silicone cooking molds and 30 minutes of my time.

    My girl was fine with me sacrificing one of her silicone cooking molds (she has many), so that was even better.

    Food-graded silicone for the win, gentlemen. Use it to fix any rattles where heat is involved (except at header pipes).
    lnewqban, X5-, knight and 4 others like this.
  10. willfreely

    willfreely Elderly Belligerent

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2013
    Oddometer:
    1,190
    Location:
    Eastern Middle Tenn
    Silicone my girl has not applicable.
    MapMaster and seasider like this.
  11. viajero

    viajero Too old to be a nOOb

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2006
    Oddometer:
    6,619
    Location:
    Idaho
    My muffler came loose during a ride today due to a nut coming loose at a mounting point. I had no tie wraps so dug out the shoulder strap for my tank bag and used that to temporarily fix it for the remainder of the ride. Yes the mountain roads in Idaho can be rough on equipment.
  12. Just4Fun11

    Just4Fun11 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2008
    Oddometer:
    395
    9537BDE7-1CEC-45F9-B15D-70483795C020.jpeg 5FE84D50-F95B-4E20-9577-8F7DEC3B6D90.jpeg CE4E59F3-A10A-4EC3-AEC9-A943388FBB3E.jpeg Unstuck stickers and the adhesive gone bad, figured out a better solution than 3M 99 adhesive spray as it goes on lumpy & stickers doesn’t lay flat.
    Venture sailboat sail tape double sided adhesive. Goes on flat if prepped looks good when done. I have owned Italian Husqvarnas and the stickers just don’t stay put.

    Attached Files:

  13. MarcoSolo

    MarcoSolo Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 4, 2012
    Oddometer:
    52
    Location:
    53948
    Nothing special but I wanted a second harness to attach a Wolfman Enduro tank bag to a second bike without having to move the original harness back and forth and I wanted longer 2" webbing to be able to use Wolfman Enduro bags on a bike with racks - Contacted Wolfman last Friday through their website contact system - no reply. Called and the customer service rep is out of the office for a week, send an email. The website shows the extra harness is "Sold Out" - screw it - went on line and found webbing at Strapworks.com - both the 2" and the 3/4" webbing will be here by the end of the week for less than half the cost of the harness. The Rock Lockster buckles they use are available as well and cheap, much cheaper buying from the suppliers than Wolfman. Love their gear and have expedition and enduro sets - just one tank bag.
  14. victor441

    victor441 Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2009
    Oddometer:
    2,313
    Location:
    Sonoma Co., Calif.
    Installed a fully adjustable cartridge fork kit on my Sportster recently (Showa forks) and need a damper rod extension tool and a spring compressor to do the job. The damper rod is 10mm x 1.0 and no one locally carries hardware like that, eventually realized I'd seen that thread before somewhere and used the bicycle rear axle seen in the photo.
    For the spring compressor used two Ohlins shock wrenches connected to two ratcheting cargo straps, worked OK.

    [​IMG]
    Richy, X5-, 16VGTIDave and 2 others like this.
  15. Wentwest

    Wentwest How's that work?

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,660
    Location:
    Northern California
    Just work outside, keep your high speed sneakers on and don't bend over the top of that rig.
  16. Effendi

    Effendi Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 2, 2019
    Oddometer:
    177
    Location:
    Texas
    Not a motorcycle fix, but............

    I have used the flat wavy silicone mats as wraps for gun suppressors previously. We could not get any suppressors covers (supply chain issues) I saw these things hanging up in the supermarket and grabbed a few grey one's, stole some 1/8 inch shock cord off a rucksack and got to it. They worked.
    X5- likes this.
  17. clintnz

    clintnz Trans-Global Chook Chaser

    Joined:
    May 17, 2004
    Oddometer:
    4,797
    Location:
    Rotoiti, North Is, New Zealand
    Another good trick for pressing on a master link side plate is to use an M6 or similar nut over the pin & squeeze with vice grips a little each end until it's home.

    Also, as long as it is reasonably new & sharp a small file will easily take down the rivets on a chain link enough that you can lever the side plate off with a tyre lever. So with a small file, 5WR Vice Grips, tyre levers & a few stray nuts in my toolkit anyway, I don't bother taking a chain tool out on the road, given chain repairs are rarely required. Nice to have one in the workshop though.

    Cheers
    Clint
    datleeman and MarcoSolo like this.
  18. theothersean

    theothersean dirty boy

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2005
    Oddometer:
    1,572
    Location:
    middle of nowhere (central mass)
    10864C60-0B6B-4894-8A39-B86C4A33FA92.jpeg CE76C148-4935-4A5B-8FEA-019C7A1227DA.jpeg F8A82905-9B08-4428-BFDB-8EC9FD0819DA.jpeg I have been looking to add tongs to my moto camp kit but wanted them to fit inside my cook pan. And be metal so I could use them on a grill. Saw a silicone block that turns utensils into tongs. But unobtanium in the USA.
    I have a bunch of these clips in the garage that come with battery tenders. Just cut the wire off and trimmed it flush on the grinder.
    My kit has the classic Boy Scout nesting utensil set. So this worked perfect.
    CaseyB, tntmo, gmk999 and 5 others like this.
  19. Nevada

    Nevada Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2009
    Oddometer:
    339
    Location:
    Utah Valley, Utah, USA - unless out riding.
    A week and a half ago, my son and I went for a ride over the mountains to have lunch on the other side. The Alpine Loop (yes, that's the name, comes out of Alpine) is a very tight, twisty, 1.5 lane road where much of it is 1st gear, some second.

    On the backside we're heading down towards Sundance, I'm following my son. Suddenly, he starts pulling off the road and next thing I see he's going off the bike in a cloud of dust. I brake to a stop and pull off, shut my SS down and head back to where he's picking himself up. Turns out he experienced a BIRE Gravity Storm. (Bug Induced Rider Error). He wears a Bilt helmet, and one of the compromises that inexpensive helmets make is the "visor cracked open" detents are even more poorly spaced than in expensive helmets. The "cracked" opening on his helmet is about an 1"!! Into that opening flew a grasshopper, which then got itself caught UNDER the internal sun visor which was down. In short, he had a grasshopper freaking out right in front of his eye. Understandably, he pulled over to deal with it. Unfortunately, he was heavy on the front brake, so when he left the pavement onto the dirt shoulder, the front locked and washed out. Instant Gravity Storm.

    So, what does this have to do with MacGyvering? Thing break when bikes crash, and in this crash, his left front turn signal was destroyed, clutch lever was bent, and... the left rider's footpeg was broken off. So, 35 miles from home, bike isn't really rideable. Or IS it? After all, it has TWO footpegs on the left side, well, had. I sit down, and suss out how the footpegs are attached. Cotter pins through the bolts. Whip out the handy dandy Leatherman Wave+ that lives on my left hip, straighten and pull the cotter pin from the passenger peg and the pin from the rider peg bolt. While the pins and bolts are the same size, the position of the hole in the pegs themselves aren't the same. It turns out that the rear peg won't mount flat in the front peg spot. It WILL, however, mount. So, mount it up, put the cotter pin in and bend it around so it doesn't fall out, toss the assorted extra mounting bits (and the busted footpeg) into the NC700X's frunk, dust ourselves off and down the mountain we go.

    This is why I carry a Leatherman.


    Attached Files:

  20. rat

    rat Dirty Hippie

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2008
    Oddometer:
    815
    Location:
    Sask., Canada
    Had a fire on my SOHC CB750 while out riding around back roads. Put it out, and managed to limp it to the next town, where I picked up a cheap trailer-light connection plug. I pigtailed the wires on the male end of the plug together, and taped them, then wired the female end into the wiring harness, the end result being that when plugged in, it was in the "run" position of the ignition switch.

    Basically, I made the male end of it into a removable "hotwire" plug, replacing the ignition switch entirely. I rode it like that for two years. Plug it in, kick it over
    GotDammitDave likes this.