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Your favorite Macgyver moments\tricks

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by HaChayalBoded, Sep 21, 2008.

  1. Loudo

    Loudo Pithy

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,275
    Location:
    I identify as Seattle
    Did your dad have a motorcycle? Because "it's the journey, not the destination" might apply to him. I approve!
    Mickalmus, CROSSBOLT and Mjpickering like this.
  2. Andyvh1959

    Andyvh1959 Cheesehead Klompen Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2012
    Oddometer:
    4,198
    Location:
    Da frozen tundra eh? 1.5 mile west of Lambeau
    Yup, he built a capstan head out of two GM steel wheels. Not sure whatever happened to it. Probably stayed in the shed we built over the pump pit. That was another story. Dad found a guy 30 miles north of Appleton with 80 solid 8" concrete blocks to get rid of. My brother in law worked car sales at a local dealer. One night we took o used Ford 3/4 ton pickup off the lot, him, my dad and crammed in the cab to pick up the block, all of them, in one load. After loading them we pumped the tires up to, oh, about 50 psi, climbed in and drove SSSLLLLOOOWWW up to the cottage. Only needed on finger on the non-powered steering wheel, because the front end was pretty light. Even being only 15 I noticed the gap between the cab and box was, um, tighter at the top than the bottom. Got the block there and unloaded, drove home. Don't recall if the cab gap evened out.

    Dad and I dug the pump pit, which in the sandy soil meant it was a good bit bigger than the 8x10 planned size. Mixed concrete and poured footings, then laid the block, later poured in a floor. Capped it with a wood deck and built the shed on top of that.

    Oh, and yes, back in Holland, before we came to the states in 59, dad was a motorcycle mechanic. His last bike was a 1950 Jawa 350 Twin, and I am SO hunting for a 48 to 54 Jawa 350 Twin to add to my collection. This is dad and mom on the Jawa:
    Dad Mom Jawa.jpg
    When I was 15 and told them I wanted a motorcycle, all dad said was "you pay for it." Done! Mom was all for it too. Never been without a bike.
  3. tag3

    tag3 Doofus

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2014
    Oddometer:
    16,407
    Location:
    Inland from the coast of Santa Cruz and Trona.
    Yer dad's cool.
  4. Andyvh1959

    Andyvh1959 Cheesehead Klompen Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2012
    Oddometer:
    4,198
    Location:
    Da frozen tundra eh? 1.5 mile west of Lambeau
    Yeah, as a teen I didn't understand what he endured in his life at that same age. Decades later I had better understanding about him. He was cool in his simple way. He had lots of stories of things he did at age 18 to 23 during WW2 in Holland, doing work after curfew for farmers to barter food for his family. Repairing things with whatever he could get his hands on, like making inner tubes for his bicycle from discarded car tires. He saved everything for that someday need. I know where I get THAT from, more relative these days than ever before.

    I now have most all his hand tools he had shipped over from Holland in a huge wooden box (wish I had the box). That one box contained all his belongings coming to the USA. We landed at Hoboken NJ June 2nd 1959, a Thursday. He started work as a VW mechanic that following Monday June 6th, only four days in the US. At times while wrenching one of my bikes, it hits me, my dad's hand used these for his livelyhood, his career. My hands where his were. Makes me miss him now. Just had a thought to use the Witworth wrenches in a display to my dad in my shop garage.
    Mickalmus, snglfin, Lzeplin and 7 others like this.
  5. brider

    brider Long suffering Cub Fan NO MORE!

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2005
    Oddometer:
    280
    Location:
    The Crossroads of America
    I now have most all his hand tools he had shipped over from Holland in a huge wooden box (wish I had the box). That one box contained all his belongings coming to the USA. We landed at Hoboken NJ June 2nd 1959, a Thursday. He started work as a VW mechanic that following Monday June 6th, only four days in the US. At times while wrenching one of my bikes, it hits me, my dad's hand used these for his livelyhood, his career. My hands where his were. Makes me miss him now. Just had a thought to use the Witworth wrenches in a display to my dad in my shop garage.[/QUOTE]

    That would be a very fitting tribute to your Pop. Shoot us all a picture when you are done with it.
    Baroquenride and tbarstow like this.
  6. Wentwest

    Wentwest How's that work?

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,662
    Location:
    Northern California
    When you grow up in the US, with parents who were kicked around and worse by WW2, it's hard to relate to the stuff they went through. We have it pretty good here. Sure there's good times and bad times, ups and downs, but no one is looking for me so they can beat me, take everything I own and maybe just kill me because ...

    My father never told me anything. Not a word. You are fortunate that you heard some stories and have things like tools to hold on to. When I cleaned out my father's house there was nothing from Europe.

    But the real celebration of their victory is to live well.
    goD giB and Dan V. like this.
  7. Andyvh1959

    Andyvh1959 Cheesehead Klompen Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2012
    Oddometer:
    4,198
    Location:
    Da frozen tundra eh? 1.5 mile west of Lambeau
    Until I understood my dad, he would drive me nuts with seemingly inane activities like breaking down wood shipping crates he'd take home from Miller Electric. I had to carefully disassemble the crate to save the wood, AND straighten and collect the nails. Years later when I built a yard shed extension on my 1st home garage he gave me all those boards to use as sub-siding. I laughed putting up the boards because on many was written "save for Pete" (dad's name), and some included commentary from co-workers like "why Pete" or "why save Pete?"

    He could lash anything onto the roof of his 67 Impala to transport, such as three sections of a steel antenna tower, with nothing but rope. Each section was longer than the car. He could strip the electric motor out of a washing machine on the curb (for trash) in five minutes. When my brother and I cleaned out his 10x12 basement workshop we hauled out a TON of metal, including a 24" x 24" three inch thick tool steel press plate. Don't know how the hell he got that signed out as scrap from Miller. I scrapped multiple coffee cans full of ten inch long fine thread high strength die press threaded rods he had collected from Miller. They were at least 1/2" diameter. He was enamored by anything of fine tool steel. Definitely would have been a major hoarder if not limited by the house he and mom lived in.
    Richarde1605, DKCJ, RVFlyer and 4 others like this.
  8. Black Hills

    Black Hills Long timer

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,927
    Location:
    Western South Dakota
    I can relate, my entire 12'X40' room above my garage is finished off with wood from scrap crates from the electric company. as are the benches in the garage, shelves in the barn, I even have a couple regulator control cabinets for storage in the barn.
    goD giB likes this.
  9. kenstone

    kenstone worn out

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2013
    Oddometer:
    1,928
    Location:
    Boysee
    Today's ethanol fuel has a lot more additives than non-eth, and non-eth is not available everywhere.
    Ethanol gas doesn't take long to gum up old school carbs not designed for it.
    Sea Foam is a good additive to combat the build-up of crud and should be added to every tank full of non-eth as a matter of prevention.
    jmo,
    :lol3
  10. zap2504

    zap2504 Dave E.

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,593
    Location:
    Middletown, PA
    I can still get non-eth gas but at only 2 places remotely close by and at a very high price per gal.
  11. MiteyF

    MiteyF Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2010
    Oddometer:
    2,729
    Location:
    Bay Area
    For your car, bike, etc, it's really not worth it usually. However, for anything that is seldom used, or gets put away seasonally, it's well worth the extra price. I try to keep ethanol free gas on hand for stuff like the generator, mower and weed wacker, because I know it won't go bad for quite some time. There aren't many things worse than trying to fire up your generator when your power goes out, only to find your E10 has gone bad.
  12. CROSSBOLT

    CROSSBOLT Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2018
    Oddometer:
    773
    Location:
    Hillville, TN
    Had one just today! Discovered the injector was plugged up. No one within 40 miles could clean and test just one injector for some reason. So, I filled up the injector feed tube with carb cleaner, carefully plugged it back into the feed hose and cycled it a few times until the spray pattern looked right then put 'er back together. No start problem solved!
  13. theothersean

    theothersean dirty boy

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2005
    Oddometer:
    1,742
    Location:
    middle of nowhere (central mass)
    I have had real good luck with the blue marine grade stabil . I use it year round in everything except my truck . , sometimes things will sit a months out use , chain saw, rototiller, 4 wheeler etc .
    the tiller gets used twice a year and fires up every time , same with the snow blower, fires right up every time after sitting many months . Had to pull my generator out last week for the first time in over a year , and it fired right up . I tried the cheaper red stuff years ago but still had gummy carbs. switched to the blue and never had an issue since .
    flei, Lafitte, tbarstow and 1 other person like this.
  14. Andyvh1959

    Andyvh1959 Cheesehead Klompen Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2012
    Oddometer:
    4,198
    Location:
    Da frozen tundra eh? 1.5 mile west of Lambeau
    Another Dad Macgyver moment; he had bought a really basic bandsaw from Menards (I think). It was a basic single speed upright band saw, but he wanted various speed selections for different materials. So he needed a motor controller, like....the speed controller on a washing machine. So he dug around and found a control panel from an old Maytag washing machine, and wired it up to the bandsaw motor. For some material you select "spin", for other materials "delicates" depending on what speed needed at the cut for the material being cut. The entire control panel of the Maytag is mounted to the side of the bandsaw stand.
  15. theothersean

    theothersean dirty boy

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2005
    Oddometer:
    1,742
    Location:
    middle of nowhere (central mass)
    93F58837-8372-4FEE-9DE1-4785777CC43B.jpeg 850C5B28-5944-4AA4-95CA-5ADE341151A8.jpeg CFD474E3-8B16-4E3B-8616-4CDEF31A441F.jpeg Needed an easier way to make the planting rows for the wife’s garden. Doing them by hand was back breaking. So I made a jig for the tractors rototiller out of some reclaimed shipping crate wood, and scraps of angle I had laying around.
    I till the whole garden first. Then bolt the frame on. It needs a couple tweaks, but gets the job done. I found it doesn’t work if the soil is too wet but otherwise works great.
    Gone in 60, Lzeplin, 42 and 8 others like this.
  16. KeithinSC

    KeithinSC Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2009
    Oddometer:
    5,935
    Location:
    Sandhills of SC
    Many have used this trick, but it worked perfect for me today. Old technique.
    I had to remove a leaky oil seal from my tractor's rear axle. 1" ID, about 1.25" OD. Drilled a small hole in the seal as best I could with the axle in the way. Screwed a wood screw into the hole, grabbed a pair of vice grips and latched onto the screw. A few taps with a hammer against the vice grips and the seal popped out of the housing where it had resided since 1968!
    Everything went textbook perfect, even installing the new seal. I felt so lucky I should go buy a lotto ticket.:gdog
  17. HeavyMetal

    HeavyMetal Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2009
    Oddometer:
    580
    Location:
    Kimberly, ID
    A good way to do it. Usually the only way.
    I have a tapered screw attachment for a slide hammer for that exact purpose. I bought it when I wrenched for a living and used it a lot.
  18. Ghostyman

    Ghostyman Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2011
    Oddometer:
    506
    Location:
    LA face with the Oakland booty
    Awesome. My wife wants a garden and I just picked up a roto tiller. This is getting saved.
  19. theothersean

    theothersean dirty boy

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2005
    Oddometer:
    1,742
    Location:
    middle of nowhere (central mass)
    390B1BD7-37FF-4BB9-947A-35A6A664AB9E.jpeg
    I added a few more boards to keep the dirt from spilling over the back.
    When I first made it. The opening in the back was centered, which forced the rows to be same width apart. I could go wider but not closer. I changed it to off set to one side so you can get the rows as close or far apart as you want.
    This is actually the second season with it. And it’s stored under cover so the wood is holding up. Doubt it would last very long if exposed to the elements.
    Richarde1605 and Ghostyman like this.
  20. Wentwest

    Wentwest How's that work?

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,662
    Location:
    Northern California
    You could probably figure out a way to use an old shovel for a blade.