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Discussion in 'The Rockies – It's all downhill from here...' started by nwcolorider, Aug 20, 2012.

  1. nwcolorider

    nwcolorider NWCOLO

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    NW Colo and SW Wyoming!
    A friends nephew is going through the process of learning to walk with an artificial leg. The kid lost it in Afghanistan a year ago. He grew up riding dirt bikes and wants to ride again. I found lots of info on the net on ideas for making the right side workable for him. But I thought I would tap this vast knowledge base for some ideas. SO here is what I have. 2007 TTR 230, that I need to make so he can brake easily and safely and use the pegs. He has a below the knee amputation, knee is functional. His leg will be one of the new blade type. I am looking at welding a little larger plate on the brake pedal (same with foot peg) But from what I have read, this a not the easiest for braking as the leg does not know exactly how hard contact is on the pedal. I had a friend recommend maybe hooking a brake light setup so when the brake is pushed, a light on the handlebar by the key comes on, indicating pressure on the the brake(what do you think?). But because of the feeling issue I am looking at doing a hand brake setup with a shorter (3") handle on the right side, above the front brake so he can distinguish which is which by feel. I have a setup off a mountain bike that looks like it will fit and work but I not sure on durability. We will be able to squeeze it in and have it so he can get both at the same time. The issues I am looking at are ways of connecting the cable from the front in with the back brake linkage. I am thinking of making a connection right here …


    [​IMG]
    But looking at ideas on how to best do this, I see this as a weak point, that if not done right could fail at a bad time! I could do baling wire and duct tape, but I do not want to make it look like something my great grandfather was fixing!(Only thing he never could fix with baling wire was his dentures! That is where his duct tape came in...:D )

    Footpeg issue, do I make it as wide as the artificial leg with a cup shape to help keep him on the peg when standing? His main use will be Forest roads and ATV tracks, nothing extreme like what some of you did this last weekend! I have access to a great metals shop , parts and materials and 2 skilled fabrication guys that are going to donate time, but do not ride.:cry So all you experts give me some input if you have any. Then we are giving it to him hopefully in October when he comes out here for hunting season, we are going to get him some elk meat. :D
    #1
  2. AnnieGS

    AnnieGS Namasté, bitches!

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    Forget the foot and add a thumb brake to the left grip...but it looks like you're working with a drum brake, right?
    #2
  3. hook0924

    hook0924 Been here awhile

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    Try another slave cylinder off the front brake, maybe with linked system from an old street bike.
    #3
  4. toddler

    toddler Unpronouncible

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    idea: move the rear brake over to the left foot and use a pingel air shifter for his shifting(ask silverboy). Don't burden his right leg with anything.
    #4
  5. mountain eagle

    mountain eagle terrorist

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    Like has been said. Skip having the right leg do anything other then standing and input for weighting the bike. Find out with him there what will work in regards to how that support should be fabbed up. For the brake there are many options. Thumb brake, auto clutch, air shifter, quite a few ways to skin that cat.
    #5
  6. selaznog

    selaznog Roadless Warrior

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    He should get an auto clutch and convert the left handlebar lever to become the rear brake. Then all he needs is a boot of some kind, or a rubber pad of some kind to ensure contact with the right peg. My 525 is set up this way.

    If this young man is anywhere Albuquerque, I'd drive a ways to meet him so he could try my set up.
    #6
  7. selaznog

    selaznog Roadless Warrior

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    Looking at the specs on the yamaha, it seems the rear brake is a drum. I wouldn't know how to convert it to hydraulic disc system, but I'm sure someone here does. I have a magura left-sided master cylinder (came with my Rekluse clutch) that I would gladly donate to any conversion project. It probably needs a lever.
    #7
  8. AnnieGS

    AnnieGS Namasté, bitches!

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    Come to think of it, the rear brake pedal on my old 1970 CT70 is integrated with the lever on the left perch (it's an automatic) - so a custom brake cable might be the easiest thing to build unless you want to convert that rear wheel. Same setup as a thumb brake (two levers on the left), but no master cylinder needed...only an old-school lever and a carefully-routed cable.

    If you want to try this, I'm pretty sure I've got a donor pedal and a brake cable (it's got a built-in switch) you can use for prototyping.
    #8
  9. MeterPig

    MeterPig Meh

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    Agreed.
    #9
  10. VxZeroKnots

    VxZeroKnots Long timer

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    paging silverboy.

    this is an awesome project keep us posted.
    #10
  11. nwcolorider

    nwcolorider NWCOLO

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    Looking at keep the drum brake and doing a custom cable. Thanks for the ideas so far. We are on a budget here, that is pretty tight. Also wanting to keep simple. I like the idea of a thumb brake on the left. But the recluse clutch system and moving the rear brake to the clutch position is my fav so far. I will have no problem with a custom cable. Just the looking at the best way to attach to the arm. You guys are awesome! :clap:clap Looking at tearing in and starting as soon as my son gets his new bike as this is his old one. The project is a surprise and he now lives in godforsaken Nebraska! He will be moving this way in October for a new job.
    #11
  12. thump_co

    thump_co ..ouch

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    ^ That. Check out this thread for ideas. http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=732416

    I'm sure Sliverboy would be happy to discuss. He's done a similar setup on a few of his bikes now.
    #12
  13. 2whlrcr

    2whlrcr gooligan

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    We have a local Hare Scramble and Enduro racer, who left his right leg over in Vietnam. He does not have a prosthetic leg, he races with one leg. He runs a hand brake for the rear, can't remember if it's on the right or left side. He does not run a Rekluse clutch either. The guy has done this for years and is not the slowest guy on course by any means and he's over 60 now.

    Good luck to your friend. People like him and this old racer are inspirations on not giving up the things you love.
    #13
  14. nwcolorider

    nwcolorider NWCOLO

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    mmmm going to look at that airshifter and recluse clutch, it may be extending the budget some. But we will see.
    Looking at pricing now on the recluse systems for a TTR:eek1 Then the air shifter is another :eek1 especially for a 5 year old TTR.
    I am thinking that if I can get him into riding again, then as the new job stabilizes and money is not as big of an issue he can look at a new bike and then we can set it up like the one in the link.
    #14
  15. nwcolorider

    nwcolorider NWCOLO

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    Thinking we are not doing the recluse, leaving the clutch. May go with the thumb shifter idea.
    This is the kiddos purchase. He is donating his 230 to the project, mom gets is 125. He was going to sell both to help pay for this. But I worked a deal on this for him. So new to him 06 WR 450.
    [​IMG]
    #15
  16. thump_co

    thump_co ..ouch

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    Probably a good idea to just start with a thumb brake. No need to get him used to extra mods. That would just mean more money needed to invest again in future bikes (exactly why I've refused to try a recluse). If you do go the air shifter route I think you have to move to a Recluse b/c the airshifter will never be precise enough to find neutral.
    #16
  17. Valker

    Valker Long timer

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    My son is a below knee amputee left side. I don't think he can use the blade foot for riding, but there are others.
    I second the thumb brake idea. If something else HAS to be used, you could hook the rear brake lever up near his right knee so that it can be used by squeezing it with his knee in toward the frame/tank.
    #17
  18. Asatrur

    Asatrur KLR adv rider

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    I have no hardware to offer, but can offer some cash for this. You guys are amazing.
    #18
  19. nwcolorider

    nwcolorider NWCOLO

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    Thanks for the offer, I think we are good. it is amazing what two machinists that have access to a coal mines metal shop can make!!:evil
    #19
  20. Tramontana

    Tramontana .

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    Getting to "the point"...
    ...seeking out Woody of Woodies Wheel Works.

    I know that they have a separate business dedicated to helping handicapped athletes.

    Might be a wealth of information? Certainly worth a call.

    Cheers, and goodonya for this project! :freaky
    #20