Zero SR/F

Discussion in 'Electric Motorcycles' started by WDG, Jan 3, 2019.

  1. T.S.Zarathustra

    T.S.Zarathustra Been here awhile

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    An oil company bought the patent for regenerative acceleration and is not going to allow anyone to use it.

    I saw the video of the Pikes Peak run. I cannot help but think that it could've been faster. I mean that the rider could have cut the corners more, accelerated earlier and braked later. He was still much faster than I would've been, riding fast is not as easy as Rossi and Marques make it look like. :D
  2. ctromley

    ctromley Been here awhile

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    I read somewhere that the SR/F race bike was put together by Zero staff on their own time. I have to wonder what they would have done with a seasoned race team and more development time. Races are not won by stellar design or trick parts. It takes a lot of incremental optimization by experienced people. Had any of the team members even been to Pikes Peak before arriving there for the race? (Phase 2 of optimization is optimizing the bike to the track, as it exists on race day.) There's a story there, and I'd like to hear it.
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  3. jimmy650

    jimmy650 South Canol Racing Club

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    Yes, I'm an ME at Zero. We are still small, and this was our first factory supported racing effort. still low budget. We started just 3 or 4 months ago as our SR/F just got into production in March. The Pikes Peak bike is basically a stock bike. We removed the lights and street stuff and charger to get the weight down. Add some sticky tires and a few racy bodywork bits and it's a race bike!

    The best thing we did was to hire a pro rider, Cory West. He was able to get a couple of test runs in at local tracks before Pikes Peak, so that helped. I believe he was improving every time he went out.

    Except for Cory, everyone on the team were Zero employees, all passionate about our racing effort. Eddie, the team leader, had ridden Pikes Peak some years ago, but for most of the team this was a new experience.

    We had a great experience, placing 5th in the heavyweight class. I hope this is just the start of ongoing racing efforts.

    -Jim R.

    Attached Files:

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  4. Plawa

    Plawa ¿ʞO ǝʞᴉq ʎɯ sI

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    Well done but now back to work, I'm waiting for regenerative acceleration before I even consider spending my hard earned money!
  5. jimmy650

    jimmy650 South Canol Racing Club

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    Yes, but it is all "hush hush" you know... lots of testing to do.
  6. Bt10

    Bt10 Been here awhile

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    Ummm :scratch
  7. Bt10

    Bt10 Been here awhile

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    szgwc.jpg
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  8. voltsxamps

    voltsxamps Advolturer

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    Check out this slick custom redesigned Zero SR/F electric motorcycle

    Micah Toll - Jul. 10th 2019 9:02 am ET

    [​IMG]
    • Untitled Motorcycles, a custom motorcycle design shop, is showing off its custom redesigned Zero SR/F electric motorcycle. The bike takes a sharp turn from the standard SR/F streetfighter appearance, and yet is still recognizable as the SR/F that gave it life.
    While Zero Motorcycles has made a lot of progress on the electric motorcycle design front, they have shied away from extreme designs.

    When building a bike meant for wide market appeal, it’s hard to get too wild with the aesthetics. But fortunately for those that want to see a little more creativity in their electric motorcycle designs, Untitled Motorcycles stepped up to the plate and went to work on a new Zero SR/F.

    Untitled is calling the new design the Zero XP. It features custom clip-on handlebars, Pirelli racing slick tires, an internally housed electronic throttle, braided brake lines, and perhaps most strikingly, entirely new body panels. Essentially every physical user interface component except for position of the seat and foot pegs has been altered.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG][​IMG]




    Hugo Eccles from Untitled described his work on the Zero SR/F as trying to feature the powertrain prominently instead of hiding it, according to MCN:

    This isn’t about novelty for novelty’s sake, or some nostalgic idea of the future. The goal is to celebrate this unique riding experience through an entirely new function-led aesthetic. If the Zero XP looks futuristic, it’s because electric motorcycles like the SR/F are the future. From the outset I knew that I didn’t want to hide the powertrain behind a fairing. I wanted to unapologetically celebrate the character of this motorcycle.

    [​IMG]

    The body panels are CNC’d polymers with frosted polycarbonate edges, and the custom seat has been upgraded to suede upholstery. The seat shell, front end, and skid plate are all CNC’d aluminum components, as are the front suspension brackets. The display is an old-fashioned-looking dot matrix screen housed in the diminutive CNC aluminum instrument panel.

    And to finish it all off, Untitled used aerospace “Ghost Grey” experimental aircraft paint, which gives it that muted yet eye-catching look.

    Untitled gave the Zero XP new custom LED lighting, including extra LED lights on small winglets. The powertrain remains the same, offering around 80 kW (107 hp) from the ZForce 75-10 motor. That motor was recently developed by Zero specifically for the SR/F. It helps the streetfighter put out 190 Nm (140 lb-ft) of torque, which is transferred via a Gates Carbon Belt Drive that was recently validated when a slightly modified Zero SR/F tackled the Pikes Peak hill climb race.

    The ZForce 75-10 motor is coaxially mounted, meaning it shares the same axle as the rear swingarm. That helps reduce complexity and maintain proper belt tension.

    [​IMG]

    With the Zero SR/F’s 14.4 kWh battery pack, the SR/F is capable of around 200 miles (322 km) of range in the city with an additional Power Tank installed. Without the Power Tank, range in the city will be closer to 160 miles (257 km) or around 80 miles (129 km) on the highway.

    https://electrek.co/2019/07/10/check-out-this-slick-custom-redesigned-zero-sr-f-electric-motorcycle/
    Night Ryder likes this.
  9. GS-A-Day

    GS-A-Day Been here awhile

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    Broken Belt during test ride

    Two or three miles into my test ride of an SR/F, the belt snapped as I was accelerating from a traffic light. In sport mode the power of the bike is amazing (even compared to my BMW 1200GSA/LC), but I wonder if it might be too much for that belt. Dealer thought a little rock might have gotten into the belt drive, but it happened on a main road, far away from any gravel.
  10. ultrarnr

    ultrarnr Been here awhile

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    That sucks. But part of me isn't surprised. I think that is one of the reasons why Energica went with chain drive instead of belt, to better handle the torque. The SR/F and the Eva 107 are REALLY close going 0-70. It is nice not having to do chain maint but as the torque goes up it will be harder for a belt to handle it. Zero used to have a smaller front sprocket available for the S and SR. It would break belts on the SR so Zero only recommended it for the S.
  11. _mtg_

    _mtg_ Been here awhile

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    That's awesome. Good work on getting Cory to 5th place in Heavyweights on the first try with a group of folks that still presumably had other daily duties.
  12. timblanch

    timblanch Adventurer

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    I tested a srf today about 15 miles. Awesome. Scary fast. Smooooth. Wow. Wow. Wow. And it was in standard not sport mode. Too much power for me. I left a speed triple in my dust at a 60 mph roll on.

    Then i rode the dsr. The speed triple walked away from it above 50. And it was in sport mode. Overall i preferred the dsr due to the more comftable and upright seating position and less intimidating power. Im seriously thinking of selling my AT dct and some gold coins to make the switch. I also preferred the dsr to the bmw cevo scooter i tested a month ago. Motorcycling handling (chassis) and better power. But it costs a few grand more. Seems like thdd perfect warm weather bike. Tim
  13. kiwial

    kiwial Allweatherrider

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    So, what is this all about with the $2300 Rapid Charger adding 6kW to the existing On Board 6kW Charger (Pemium...), adding up to 12kW, as advertised on Zero's website, when a Level 2 Charging Station can only deliver 7.4kW?
    I've read the last couple of hours, here, Alan Cathard's review (the Man) , Cycle World, Revzilla, Forums and nobody has explained it yet.
  14. ctromley

    ctromley Been here awhile

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    Standard charges at 3 kW, Premium at 6 kW. Whichever one you have, the Rapid Charge option adds another 6 kW. That gives a total of 9 or 12 kW.

    You can buy a Level 2 EVSE that will pump up to 18 kW (biggest I know of):

    https://emotorwerks.com/store/residential/juicebox-pro-75-smart-75-amp-evse-with-24-foot-cable

    My much more modest version can handle 9.6 kW. Not sure what's being installed out in the wild these days, but 6kW was pretty common not long ago. If you plug in your 12 kW capable SR/F to an EVSE that can only handle 3 kW (yes, they're out there), the handshake sorts things out and you charge at 3 kW. If you use the charging "cable" included with the bike you're limited to 1.4 kW.

    So if you want to actually use the 12 kW capability of your fully-optioned SR/F, you need to drop ~$900 + wiring for an EVSE that will provide it at home. If you have a Standard with the Rapid Charge option (9 kW), you can get by with a $550 EVSE:

    https://emotorwerks.com/store/residential/juicebox-pro-40-smart-40-amp-evse-with-24-foot-cable

    The wiring is much cheaper too, since this EVSE can plug into a standard 14-50 receptacle instead of being hard-wired.

    There are probably some 9.6 kW EVSE in the wild. It's unlikely you'll find 12 kW capability on the road (as of today - should get better with time). AFAIK, Zero doesn't do Level 3.

    Tip: If you're installing a new EVSE, it's a good idea to make it more capable than you need to future-proof it a bit. My car only charges at 3kW. My EVSE seemed like overkill at 9.6 kW a few years ago. Now not so much.
  15. kiwial

    kiwial Allweatherrider

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    That's exactly what I found out in my research.
    Only home installed chargers can pump out more than the 7.4kW a Level 2 charging station can provide.
    E.g., Clippercreek, can pump out 19kW and I've seen some that go even higher with the max being 22kW (Webasto, Keba...) so far.
    What this all means in the end however is that the 12kW max charging capability advertised can ONLY be reached at home, NOT ON THE ROAD. Which is kind of a bit misleading.
    Still, 6kW is better than the 3kW of the Energica (which can at least be Level 3 (22kW) fast charged) or the BMW C Evo.
    Lighning Strike Standard and Midrange will come with a Level 2, 3.3kW charger with an optional 6.6kW charger at a additional $1500 (plus optional Level 3 charging capability at another $1500).
    Conclusion, the ideal, of course, would be Level 1 (a given), Level 2 at 7.4kW and Level 3 at 22kW (max possibly atm) capability, which, by the way is nearly possible with the Lighning Strike (6.6kW instead of 7.4kW at Level 2).
  16. ultrarnr

    ultrarnr Been here awhile

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    I asked a question over on the electricmotorcycle forum about L2 chargers that are more than 6.6 kw. Someone forwarded that to Terry Hershaw who has far more experience than anyone as far as charging and traveling with a Zero goes. His response was that about 99% of all L2 chargers out there are 6.6 kw. Very few put out more than that. Yes you can buy home chargers that put out more. The idea of charging at 12kw is really for Europe as they have higher powered L2 systems.
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  17. kiwial

    kiwial Allweatherrider

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    Ok, fair enough, 6.6kW it is. And the European Standart is so different. I just found some info on it. They have Type 2 stations and Germany alone has 1100 charge points that charge up to 10kW, 5000 that charge to 21kW, 20.000 that charge to 42kW and 2300 CCS stations.
  18. jimmy650

    jimmy650 South Canol Racing Club

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    The US is behind again...
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  19. timblanch

    timblanch Adventurer

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    Imho, all this level 3 talk misses the point of home charging limited to 240v. I have a lovely Siemens Versacharger that runs at a sweet 7.2 kW using 240v x 30 A. I suppose you could ratchet a home circuit up to 50 A treating it as a heavy appliance powering up to 12.0 kW, but thats probably pushing things to the practical limit. Level 2 is great for an easy 6.6 to 7.2 kW at home. This is why i think HD messed up. Quick recharges at home are more useful to me than sitting in a parking garage all day at work. Tim
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  20. ctromley

    ctromley Been here awhile

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    Important point that I should have included in my EVSE manifesto above:

    If you install an EVSE designed to deliver 40 A (times 240 V = 9.6 kW), you need to run a 50A circuit to it. Charging is considered a continuous process (I think defined as anything that lasts over an hour?), which requires de-rating the circuit to 80% of its nominal current rating. That's why Level 1 charging only gets you 1.4 kW, when 15 A x 120 V = 1.8 kW. 80% of 15 A is 12 A. 12 A x 120 V = 1.44 kW.

    An EVSE on a 30 A circuit IS NOT rated for 7.2 kW! 240 V x 30 A x .8 = 5.76 kW. Anything more is a code violation.

    If you don't de-rate your circuit 1) you are violating local and national codes and 2) are very likely to damage your wiring, fittings and/or EVSE. Melty insulation shrinks, bends and exposes conductors. The heat can melt or embrittle plastics.

    EV fires make big news, but more often than not the cause is not the EV - it's the charging setup. Don't be a statistic. It hurts us all.
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