1. eNewsletter Sign Up

Zumo 220 - Anyone have anything to say about this unit?

Discussion in 'GPS 101 - Which GPS For Me' started by devrodirt, Sep 27, 2010.

  1. devrodirt

    devrodirt devro

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2007
    Oddometer:
    521
    Location:
    London, Arkansas
    Well after talking to a couple people and finding little or no info on the 220 I have decided to shift gears.
    I beleive my new GPS unit will be a Garmin nuvi 500.
    Waterproof, comes loaded with street maps and topo maps. Is supposed to be tougher than other nuvi units but probably not as tough as a Zumo.
    Capable of entering multiple waypoints for a route. Will record one route but will not "track" or upload/download to MapSourse.

    I use a 60CSx for all my trip planning, tracking ect and I'll just contunue to carry both with me on the bike. When the going gets real tough I won't need a street oriented unit anyway so I'll just pack the nuvi away and rely on the 60.

    Now, does anyone have any practicle experience with the RAM Aqua Box Cradle??????
    http://www.gpscity.com/ram-mount-aqua-box-cradle-wide-ram-hol-aq6u-videos.html?youtube=IkOOpWfxxr0

    The 500 lists for $300, I've found it for $200
    #21
  2. tbirdsp

    tbirdsp REMF

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2002
    Oddometer:
    8,944
    Location:
    Nebraska
    Devro - as you proably know, I have a 60Cx. I bought a Nuvi 500 early this year and have been very impressed with it.

    First off - why an Aquabox? The Nuvi 500 is IPX7 waterproof just like your 60CSx.

    "Capable of entering multiple waypoints for a route. Will record one route but will not "track" or upload/download to MapSourse."

    Not sure what you mean here. It records a very good tracklog ("trip log") and it will archive when full so nothing is ever lost. You certainly can download these recorded tracks to Mapsource. However, there is no way to load a track to the unit.

    You can build custom routes in Mapsource of up to 250 points each. 10 of these "custom routes" can be imported at a time, but you can store as many as you want in .gpx files on the microSD card.

    There's a pretty steep learning curve because the Nuvi operates vey differently from the 60CSx. I've gone through this already though and will be happy to answer any questions:D
    #22
  3. devrodirt

    devrodirt devro

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2007
    Oddometer:
    521
    Location:
    London, Arkansas
    Yo tbird!
    Hey thanks for the info and input.
    I was unsure of the route capabilities of the 500 and did not know routes could be loaded to/from MapSourse.
    I hate using routes, but they are better than nothing.

    Your help here has got me feeling better about my decision to get the 500.

    I'm familure with the nuvi, I've gone through a couple of them and like the way they work and think so maybe I won't have too much trouble learning the language of the 500. But if I need help I'll shure 'nuff give you a shout.

    The Aqua Box? Just curious. And also wondering how the 500 could be waterproof to ipx7 standards when the power connecter is unprotected.

    Have you used your 500 in the rain or dumped it in a creek?

    Thanks again
    #23
  4. TRZ Charlie

    TRZ Charlie That's MR. Asshole

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2008
    Oddometer:
    20,557
    Location:
    Fayetteville, AR
    Devro,

    They are quite adequate in the rain but I can't speak to how they will be in a creek drowning. The Garmin specs say good down to 3' for thirty minutes without damage.

    I also know how you and Terry ride. You won't be happy with the 500. I have one and it sucks off road. In order to keep if from recalculating if you deviate from the route you need avoidances turned off and the unit set to off road. The unit then treats the route somewhat like a track. Also, it is prone to the infamous "straight line anomalies" which will drive you crazy in hair pin turns and tight twisties.

    Just my opinion. If you get up to the Eureka area you are more than welcome to borrow mine for a week or so to try it out ...that is sans water immersion...just sayin


    #24
  5. devrodirt

    devrodirt devro

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2007
    Oddometer:
    521
    Location:
    London, Arkansas
    Dang Chas, now you got me confused and thinking again!!!

    I plan on using the 500 for mostly on-road stuff and my 60 for off-road.
    I'm happy with how a nuvi works for on road, I've ruined a couple of them and was thinking that maybe the 500 would hold up a little better for me.

    I really don''t see using it for any tracking off-road but would like to use it to get me to places on road, both on the bike and in the truck.
    How do you think it will work for that?
    #25
  6. TRZ Charlie

    TRZ Charlie That's MR. Asshole

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2008
    Oddometer:
    20,557
    Location:
    Fayetteville, AR
    It'll be fine for that. It is a rugged unit and will work great in that capacity.
    #26
  7. devrodirt

    devrodirt devro

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2007
    Oddometer:
    521
    Location:
    London, Arkansas
    Thanks a bunch for the input.

    ride straight
    #27
  8. tbirdsp

    tbirdsp REMF

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2002
    Oddometer:
    8,944
    Location:
    Nebraska
    Don't know what the "infamous straight line anomalies" are, care to elaborate?

    On the recalc - yes, there is no way to turn off the automatic off-route recalculation. In actual use I have found this to be a non-issue. If you add plenty of via points to your custom routes (remember you can use 250 vs 50 for a 60CSx) all it does if you go off route is recalc you to the via point in your route which you missed. Once you are back on route it will continue it unchanged. If things really get screwed up you can just stop navigation, reselect the route, hit "GO!", and choose "no" when it asks if you want to navigate to the start of the route. I had originally reported that it will do nothing until you intercept your route just by using the map to find the magenta line. I recenty found this isn't true. As you approach your route it will eventually grab on to the nearest via point and then start navigating you to it. The distance at which this happens seems to vary though. Again - once you are back on route it will continue navigating you on it unchanged.

    I have only used it in the rain once and that was on battery power so I had the rubber plug in the USB port. I now have my street bikes wired up with power cords. If I was in a heavy downpoiur I think I would just unplug the cord and run the thing on the battery.

    I use this Garmin cradle and power cord on my ST1100
    http://www.offroute.com/product/view_product.asp?x_ID=149253&CatID=14248&p=0
    The cradle has a shield which somewhat protects the USB plug from direct spray. Also the USB plug has a small rubber boot around it which may give some protection from moisture. This power cord is more robust than the Gilsson one I have on my Bonneville. The Gilsson cord lacks the rubber boot and fuse holder, plus the wires are lighter guage.
    http://www.gpscity.com/gilsson-bare-wire-power-cable.html

    I did use the Nuvi 500 for a couple of rough dirt road rides on my KLR and it was fine. Again - the track recording abilities of this unit are almost as good as the 60CSx. You can't customize how often it leaves points, buit I'd say it's about comparable to the "Auto - most often" setting on the 60CSx.

    Bottom line - I agree with DRZ Charlie - not the best for off road but for your stated use it will be great.
    #28
  9. devrodirt

    devrodirt devro

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2007
    Oddometer:
    521
    Location:
    London, Arkansas
    Well I just ordered a 500 so when it gets to me I guess I'll figure all that stuff out.
    Can't I just tell the thing where I want to go and let it figure the route? Or find it on the screen and tell it to get me there?

    I was able to do this with my previous nuvi 350 and it was great. No matter how lost I was in the forest it would find forest roads and get me to where I wanted to go. I usually just found an intersection or someplace I knew on a paper map, found that place on the nuvi map, selected it, and it found the best route and took me there.
    Hopefully the 500 will do that. That's really all I need it to do.

    Thanks again. I'll let you know in a few weeks how it's going.

    That mount you sent me the link to:
    Will it connect to a RAM mount?
    I am assuming the power cord provides the proper voltage and power protection of a stock Garmin 12v power cord?

    I have planned to use a RAM mount and the stock 12v cord and plug it into a cig lighter plug on the bike. That should do it, huh?

    I've learned that some aftermarket power cords for a Garmin unit are VERY bad things. If you open up the male cig lighter end of a Garmin power cord it is full of all kinds of doodad diods, electonic soldered things and other bionic and nuclear devices to protect the unit.
    Hooking a nuvi to direct 12v could lead to instantaneous death. Been there, done that.

    stay in touch
    #29
  10. tbirdsp

    tbirdsp REMF

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2002
    Oddometer:
    8,944
    Location:
    Nebraska
    Yes to all of the above :D
    You can certainly use a RAM cradle and the stock cig lighter plug. I just don't have a cig lighter plug on my bikes.
    Th Garmin cradle comes with a RAM ball, but you still need a ball and arm for your bike (which I'm sure you have).
    #30
  11. TRZ Charlie

    TRZ Charlie That's MR. Asshole

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2008
    Oddometer:
    20,557
    Location:
    Fayetteville, AR
    The 500 is plagued by the PONI point problem (Points Of No Interest) or better known as shapepoints. These shape points on the 500 series do not play well with routes through tight forest trails or switchbacks. The result is that you end up with lines on your route that start at the begining of your first switchback or series of twisties and don't end until you pass the last one in the string. The lines are straight. Point to point, one straight line.

    Now this sounds worse than it is because you can still see the road the original route was on and often you will see the original route in addition to the straight lines. This can be confusing when you're flying up a forest road and it splits at the apex of one of the these switchbacks. I often had to stop and determine which way I had to go by scanning out on the map.

    While this isn't hard it is aggravating. Couple that with a few times of killing the route and reloading it because the unit tried to reroute you then you have a gps that isn't worth what you paid for it.

    On the upside, it's rugged. If you were to do like the Goldwing guys and place the Nuvi next to the 60csx then you would have a workable solution.
    #31
  12. tbirdsp

    tbirdsp REMF

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2002
    Oddometer:
    8,944
    Location:
    Nebraska
    Sorrry, I don't know what you are talking about. I haven't used the Nuvi on any real "forest road" rides, but I have done routes on some pretty tight paved switchbacks (like AR 123) and never experienced anything of the sort :dunno

    Just got back from a 1300-mile trip on my ST1100 following fairly complex custom routes planned ahead of time in Mapsource. The Nuvi 500 worked fine.
    #32
  13. xRussellx

    xRussellx Flyboy

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2010
    Oddometer:
    10
    Location:
    Wartown, Georgia
    All I see people reviewing are Garmin products. I'm on my 3rd Garmin for my car so I was really hoping to move away from them to a TomTom or one of the backcountry GPS's (DeLorme?) My friend has a TomTom (for his car) and I really like it's display and routing program but I haven't heard about their motorcycle version. Thoughts?
    #33