A Vent/ request for help/ideas/ is it normal to think like this?

Discussion in 'Face Plant' started by canoli, Dec 13, 2017.

  1. fprintf

    fprintf Been here awhile

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    I think doing track days and driving to ride in dirt might be my path too. However when I started calculating the expenses even for casual track days (which means less wear and tear on the bike, less tires and brakes etc.) we're talking many thousands per year just in track day fees, which run about $250 a day nearby. 10 days of riding, several hours a day, and hold smokes is this going to get expensive per minute of enjoyment. Staying to track only is going to be difficult for sure.
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  2. Motor7

    Motor7 Long timer

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    Canoli if it were me, I know exactly the way I would get in my 'wind & G-force' therapy:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
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  3. canoli

    canoli human

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    Not from round these parts.

    Nope.











    :lol3
  4. holckster

    holckster dougholck

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    My favorite Dirty Harry quote is "A mans got to know his limitations".
    At 68 I have 58 years of continuous motorcycle ownership and been banged up many times but only 3 broken ribs from a Baja off to my credit.
    Many close calls in 300,000+ miles of riding but I've been very lucky.
    I realize I'm not as sharp and strong as I once was and vision degrades with age so I'm considering selling my 3 motorcycles.
    I've already purchased a running and driving survivor 1967 Chevelle (my high school dream car) and will use moto sale funds for upgraded parts.

    Drivers and traffic are insane these days and if I survived a traumatic injury accident it would be an easy decision to quit.

    If you decide to shift to dual sport offroad riding (fire and jeep roads) consider a Suzuki DR650.
    I've kept mine in South America last 4 years (talk about crazy drivers) and it does 65mph easily on pavement and handles off road fine and is cheap to purchase and maintain.

    There is life after motorcycles and the memories of all the rides lasts forever but there's always room for new memories.

    Good Luck
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  5. malignity

    malignity Wonton

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    There's nothing quite like being on a bike. I suffered a really traumatic accident myself, and a few others that have been less than pleasant. I'm 34 now, and plan to ride until I physically can't. I've been riding since I was 4. Both my parents rode and my grandfather rode. It's literally in my blood, and I can't picture myself any other way. I jokingly say that I'll be doing the same thing Doug Henry did to get back on two wheels if I have to.

    Our dual sport club has a group of older guys that still go out and ride to this day. They mostly do adventure stuff, but the club's oldest member is 83 now I think. His buddy Hank is in his 70's, and suffered a hell of an accident last year; broken ribs, broken back, and i think a collar bone. He took the rest of the year off, got the suspension lowered 4" on his XR650L and is back at it again this year.

    I mostly ride off-road these days though too. Though that's where all my accidents have happened, I've had too many "on road" close calls that would most certainly have resulted in death should I not have the off-road experience and riding capability that I do that saved my ass. Sending a Yamaha XS750 triple into a ditch or into a curb while on the pegs to avoid a car is no joke. Though a tree isn't much better than a car, at least trees are static.

    With the ever growing SxS population and the lack of DNR policing the trails though, even that can get dangerous. Nothing is a guarantee on a bike except for lots of fun and the inevitable injury. No one is immune.
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  6. canoli

    canoli human

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    I do miss that DR 650....Went everywhere and best $2500 I ever spent.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
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  7. ObiJohn

    ObiJohn Screaming Banshee

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    Hindsight is 20/20. Maybe there's something you could have done, maybe not. Time flows only in one direction and we can't go back and undo what was done, or do what wasn't. Whether or not you should give up riding is your decision. I know that my brushes and close calls have made me consider my own mortality. My last stay in the ICU had me thinking about how many lives I had left, and that maybe I should save some of the remaining ones for my old age! :-) Actually, it had me in a morbidly objective mood, thinking that the actual incident was so shocking that it wasn't painful, and that is what death would be like... a moment of shock but no pain. That was actually reassuring, in that I really lost any fear I had of dying and in fact kind of resigned myself to acknowledging and accepting what we all know to be true... that as another poster mentioned, we all have that appointment in Samarra. Of course, be mindful that this could all be BS and a result of my TBI.

    Get things right with your loved ones and your estate so that, if that appointment comes, you don't leave anyone in the lurch. And then live your life... YOUR life. Heal quickly, brother.
  8. fprintf

    fprintf Been here awhile

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    When I was 14 I was hit on my bicycle by a car doing well over the speed limit. It was so quick and I was spinning in the air and there was no pain at all. If I had died at that point that would have been it. Quick, painless. However a few minutes later the pain started flooding in and it was excruciating.

    I also lost my fear of dying at that point. However I have regained that fear now that I have my own family and I think about what they will deal with when I am gone. While death and dying are all part of the human condition it is rather selfish of me to not consider their feelings in all of this. So it is for this reason that I am no longer considering getting a street motorcycle. Instead I'm getting a trials bike when time and funds allow, about the slowest, safest motorcycling you can do!
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  9. canoli

    canoli human

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    It's not the death thing that scares me. We are all going to die at some point so yes life is fatal. But just watch any motorcycle movie or show and you will see some guy on the side or in the back who is in a wheel chair. THAT is the thing that scares me the most. Not saying that it would be the end of the world or anything, but to me THAT is the beyond the limit of what I am willing to go through to enjoy a hobby.

    It's now 7 months on since I got hit and I am still in pain, not able to do what I want physically and the medical bills are still being counted (up to about $250,000). I am beyond grateful for the people, insurance companies and hospitals that have been there to help. Without them I would be in absolutely terrible shape. I just dont think I have the will to personally go through this ever again and/or put my loved ones through it.

    Again thanks to all of those who are here.

    Canoli
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  10. O.C.F.RIDER

    O.C.F.RIDER Loose nut behind h/bars

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    It's not the death thing that scares me. We are all going to die at some point so yes life is fatal. But just watch any motorcycle movie or show and you will see some guy on the side or in the back who is in a wheel chair. THAT is the thing that scares me the most.
    ^^^^^ THIS ^^^^^

    This year marks 51 years of riding for me. Dirt, road, road-racing, Supermoto, enduro, hare scrambles, ice, hill-climb, Rally. 7 working bikes downstairs, 2 project bikes.
    Been hurt loads of times, dead on the side of Bridgehampton Raceway way back in 1978, helicopter ride in 2006, many broken bones, many concussions (may explain why I am the way I am), but the thought of NOT riding anymore never once entered my mind. Not even once. I'm defined by bikes. It's always been such a huge part of my life, that me, or anyone that knows me, could imagine me not riding.
    That being said, the whole "wheel-chair" thing is what scares the living shit out of me. I wouldn't be the TV Documentary "Profiles In Courage" thing. No. I'd be the, "Where the fuck is my gun" thing.
    Being dead isn't scary. Being even more useless than I already am is.
    BTW, your dirt-bike story link didn't seem to have an unhappy ending, and you had some adventures on your DR650, so why not just get another DS bike and have at it????? You know as well as anyone else, you can get all fucked up about a zillion different ways, bikes are just one of them. At least when you get hurt on a bike, you were probably having a lot of fun when you did it! Better than tripping on a rock hiking and compound fracturing your wrist!
    Just "existing" is very easy, LIVING is harder.
    Off for some Breakfast with my Super-duper Ducati Monster S4R!!!!!!

    Ride On!

    Chris
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  11. TM1(SS)

    TM1(SS) Been here awhile

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    I have had two NDEs (near death experiences), one extremely frightening and the other I actually didn't know about until I was "back". I look at it all this way; thousands of people die every year from falling and hitting their heads, hypokalemic heart attack from diarrhea, chocking on a piece of food, falling off of a ladder, etcetera. I ride my bikes like the proverbial Grandpa Jones, and some of my state trooper friends with whom I've ridden have commented that a person would really have to go out of their way to hit me. I am an ultimate cautious rider. The sheer joy I have in riding will keep me doing it until it is no longer physically possible. I have serious balance issues that will likely progress in severity and am already planning on adding sidecars to my Beemer and Vespa in the future when it becomes necessary, but as long as I CAN see and move, I WILL ride.
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  12. TheBear

    TheBear Adventurer

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    I'm 71 and I've just bought a Kawasaki Turbo (missed my old one, sold in a moment of madness, too much) and am about to collect a BMW R 90 S for touring. I also have a Ducati Scrambler (new one) and a Harley Sportster 72. I commute every day, I ride on weekends and I travel overseas by bike as much as i can. Am I certifiably insane or just... The Bear?
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  13. ToothDocJay

    ToothDocJay Been here awhile

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    I've got a friend who found himself in much the same situation as you, but with much more minor injuries.

    He has only recently gotten back on his bike and I think he's considering a lot of things in the long run, notwithstanding what was probably his first encounter with mortality;

    - He's got young kids, sometimes you sacrifice for your family, maybe he's going to put the bike away until they are "older". Again, he's younger, and you have to evaluate choices differently at different ages and points in your life. If I die on a bike one day at least my kids had lots of time to know their weird dad. You have to take into account the people who matter most in your life (and they you.....my wife is OK with me riding).

    - He was on the commute when his accident happened. Of course he drives through the city to get to work, maybe he should take the car instead of the bike. Sounds like a good compromise, you know minimizing risk and all. I live in the country, only deal with city traffic when I choose to, not because I have to. Maybe he will choose not to deal with it for his commute.

    - Can you accept that sometimes shit just happens, that things are beyond your control? You can be doing everything right and it just takes someone or something else doing something wrong and all your efforts don't matter at all. Everything carries risk, riding a bike in traffic certainly does, more than a quiet country road in most cases. I just feel that you can't let things you basically have no influence or control over affect your life. Otherwise a person must live in fear all the time because there is just so much in this world that we can't control.

    - What is your ROI, or Return on Investment, when you ride and accept the risks of doing so? That's a complex calculation that is different for everyone. Not to mention that calculation can change regularly. Do the math, accept the results when you do, and be prepared to do the math again sometime down the road. Similar to all the "when am I too old for this" threads, it's a different result for everyone.

    Glad to hear you are OK!
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  14. Schlug

    Schlug JockeyfullofBourbon

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    put something on and stay in that position.
    My commute is a very pleasurable 20 minute vacation each side of work. I think about traffic, tarmac, how the bike is running, etc. I do not think about work, listen to the radio, drink coffee, etc. I'm focused and it's nearly zen like. The rest of the world can fuck off while I'm on the motorbike.

    I was knocked of my bike by an idiot who was at a dead stop and accelerated straight into the right side of my motorbike. He collided with the pannier which sets back pretty far on a Dakar F650.

    [​IMG]

    I was firmly in his field of vision and yet the pillock pulled straight into the side of my bike. This is a photo from this Spring but you can clearly see the damage he inflicted. I bashed it out a bit so the lid would work.


    I consider myself a strong person, mentally, but I didn't touch that bike for years. I don't know if I was scared or what my problem was, really. It wasn't conscious. The bike was totaled and I bought it back, but didn't lay a hand on it for 2 years? It just sat there all sad and neglected. It took me quite a while to get back on my other motorbike.

    Funny, how the mind works.
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  15. McCrackin

    McCrackin Adventurer

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    Something I did for my peace of mind was to make myself as visible as possible. I was introduced to Clearwater lights, and never look back. I have them on my bike and I'm convinced that they have saved me already. Even in daytime, when I see a car start to pull out in front of me and I flashed the high beams, it wakes them up immediately! I am not affiliated with clear water lights, but I will say that I will never ride another bike without them. My girlfriend got so jealous that we put some on her bike too, I had a surprising feeling of security once I started seeing her ride with those bright lights up front! Make yourself visible and you will be safer. Good luck, I am sure you will figure out what works for you.
    TM1(SS) likes this.