ADV Minimalist Cookbook Thread

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by Burtonridr, Dec 18, 2008.

  1. 16VGTIDave

    16VGTIDave Reaver made me do it...

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    :imaposerThat was a challenge. But you are free to misinterpret and take insult as you wish!
    Many have called me stupid, but you are the first to call me pretty.
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  2. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad Former World's Foremost Authority

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    Most of our camping is dry in the desert so we have to carry all of our water. I like to use Aquafina 500ml bottles because I can spread a bunch of bottles out between the panniers. I heat my water with a Coleman 530 stove. Rather than using "instant" oatmeal (aka: wall paper paste), I really prefer Coach's Oats which is a toasted & "cracked" full grain oat. I measure out my Coach's Oats into small ziploc bags and while prepping the bags I'll add raisins and brown sugar. One 500ml bottle of water makes 2 servings of oatmeal. I dump the bag of oats into the water then bring to a boil. After boiling the mixture for a min, the oats are ready to eat in just another min or two.

    coachs-oats.jpg coach's oats.jpg
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  3. Coopdway

    Coopdway Curiouser

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    It's not a regular thing but I've done it more than a few times and look forward to more meals just like it, especially when the riding has run long, it's raining and for whatever the reason, prep, fire, heat all seem like too much work. Make a dinner stop at a food mart deli, pick up a small Caesar salad, a chicken breast and some cherry tomatoes ( I like tomatoes). Open the salad bag, cut (tear) up the breast, add some tomatoes. I eat right out of the bag, getting salad that's sorely missed while on the road. No cooking, no cleanup and a very refreshing meal. Cutlery, salt/pepper, dressing, croutons, etc. all at the Deli. I've altered the salad, adding tomatoes, cucumber, cheese, etc instead of the chicken. Depending on season/locale, I've made some if not most of the items last until the next day, morning at the very least without refrigeration.
  4. Backcountry Bob

    Backcountry Bob Been here awhile

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    I have been backpacking for years and love to make what i've come to know as a hobo pack you take a large piece of foil and fill it with potatoes onions sausage of your choice etc. Add butter and seasoning fold up tight. Then all you have to do is toss it right on the coals of your fire for 20 plus min pull it off and tear foil and eat no dishes easy to make and it's damn good too.
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  5. Backcountry Bob

    Backcountry Bob Been here awhile

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    Left overs work great if you can manage some eggs for breakfast too
  6. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

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    It was for coffee & tea water. Thermos was easier.
  7. Runwithscissors

    Runwithscissors Runwithscissors

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    College nutrition class told us pine needles are loaded with vitamin C.
  8. fullmetalscooter

    fullmetalscooter Let me take this duck off

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    Yep some other tree needles are used to make a tea like the first nations used to do. They also used to use a Yaupon holly bush native to usa / canada as drink because it contains caffeine . For some reason in the last 120 years its fallen off the radars. Some say because it was a poor mans drink and the brithish pushed black tea instead by giving a bad name . I Most people think it's just a weed. Whom knew you can get your caffeine fix for free out of your back yard. https://www.npr.org/sections/thesal...e-buzz-on-americas-forgotten-native-tea-plant
  9. turbodieseli4i6

    turbodieseli4i6 Been here awhile

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  10. Backcountry Bob

    Backcountry Bob Been here awhile

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    If we are talking back yard edibles I think we need a new thread because I can go on and on about wild edibles in the USA.
    While most people think things are weeds I could go into a yard and put together a salad and possibly a protein meal with a flavored drink possibly sweetened with just the native plants and some you had your gardener put in because they look nice.

    For some easy starters and common things people can,easily identify dandelions are great and the whole plant can be eaten leaves for salad flowers are delicious stalk will sweeten a tea.
    Plantain is another very common yard weed in north America.
    While not as well know do a quick Google images search and you will realize oh wow yeah I've seen those. They are not as good but are nutritious.
    Another common one is miners lettuce usually near water sources or wet areas.
    The taste is very similar to butter lettuce.
    Willow trees leaves and bark are great for tea and also contain aspirin so great for a headache and yes pine needles are a very good source of vitamin C and if you like a pine taste (gin) you will like the tea.
    These are all common items you can find and not have to cook.
    If anyone is more interested P.M. me and maybe I'll start a adventure survivalist thread
    This is not a profession of mine but a passion as I've mentioned before I have been hiking the backcountry for years and even spent 9 days in the Los Padres national forest with nothing for food but what I could catch or forage.
    Ok I believe I have used up all more words for the day lol.

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  11. Menhir

    Menhir Adventurer

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    I take a backpacker's approach to my camping trips...Keeping it simple and light. Small isobutane stove, one of those Boy Scout aluminum cooksets, and a very small frying pan. Everything has to revolve around that. I don't prepare food so much as boil it, heat it, or unwrap it.

    Foods I may pack along...

    Instant Oatmeal packets
    Instant Buttered Grits packets (a small bottle of maple syrup to add some flavor)
    instant coffee packets
    fruit cups
    nut/fruit bars.
    OvaEasy always comes along. It's a powdered egg substitute that is to me, indistinguishable from scrambled eggs. Add water, stir, and cook.

    A few drink boxes. I always carry a cowboy canteen of water, but a little flavored drink is nice along the road or with a meal. The canteen water is mainly for any hiking I might decide do and for cooking and cleaning. I keep it filled along the way from water fountains at rest stops, etc.. I rarely ever buy bottled water along the way anymore.

    Chef Boyardee single serve cans of whichever type of pasta I like.
    Ramen, of course. I never get tired of Ramen.
    Instant Mac and Cheese
    Rice cups, canned soup...whatever I can prepare merely by heating.

    I'll collect a few of those little salt, pepper packets when I dine out over the year so I always have them on hand for trips. No need for shakers.
    Bread doesn't travel well, but rice cakes do. Restaurant types of jelly, peanut butter, ketchup, mustard, you-name-it packets also come in handy.

    When I first started motocamping, I'd figure the number of days I'd be away and make sure I had enough food for three meals each day. It took up a lot of space and I'd end up packing most of it back home. It didn't take long for me to realize that I could almost always find someplace to eat lunch or dinner, or at least pick up food to prepare the evening's meal along the way at a grocery store or a gas station.
    Now, I mostly make sure I have a decent supply of breakfast stuff as I usually hit the road early, and just a couple of evening meals in case I miss picking something up earlier or just set camp when it's too late or too remote to get food elsewhere.

    It works for me.
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  12. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    As I have to take a ferry to start any journey, I take a handful of those salt and pepper sachets for use along the way. There are other condiments, but mostly I don't have a use for them.

    I am still using a BIC lighter I found on a campsite years ago. It has no gas, but the sparking thing still gives great sparks. Works beautifully on the gas trangia.
    [​IMG]
    Not sure if these French designed lighters are available in the US.

    I love the markets in France, even the regular ones are mostly occupied by farmers and producers. The communities they serve are mostly small and close knit, trying to sell them stale and sad produce would be economic suicide. Even though France has lots of huge hypermarkets, the markets keep going. Often the prices are lower and the freshness and quality are great.
    If you are definitely on a budget, there are often stalls which sell deformed and size peculiar goods for even less. The freshness and taste is just as good - if you are chopping it up anyway, what the hell.

    Especially when moving daily, a lunch from market bought produce can be put together very cheaply. A big beefsteak tomato, a round of goats cheese, a baguette or ficelle from the local boulangerie. Maybe a peach or a couple of apricots for desert if we were able to resist the tarts and flans in the bakers. A litre of cheap beer from a local shop that keeps it in a chiller.
    A short ride to the next overlook, mountain pull off or next to a river - there are lots of picnic tables scattered around in rural France, just for such purposes.

    Markets and small towns will have butchers or stalls selling those rotisserie chickens either on the side of the road or from vans in the market. Alongside the regular small, medium and large, they usually have ditto in "fermier" (lit. farmer) so at least free range, and likely organic too.
    A "small" will provide a blow out for two. I keep the carcase and left overs to make a quick stock + the pickings. Sometimes there is something easy to add make into a better soup.
    I had great success with watercress, but small hearty lettuce and peas - or other light and quick to cook veg like young pak choi. You always buy by weight, so a single carrot or small handful of peas is not looked down on.
    One piece of kit is a speed peeler, use it to shave thin slices off harder veg like carrot , to help speed cooking.
    [​IMG]Cheap and available everywhere in France, and most of Europe too.

    Then there are the carbs, a handful of rice or pasta of whatever sort you have. Personally I like my soups to be soupy, especially in summer. Too much rice or pasta tends to make more of a carb stew with an excess of starch run off floating about, giving the liquid a slimy mouth feel. IMHO.
    If other carbs seem a pain, there is always plenty of bread. Many boulangerie will have fresh bread for breakfast. More for lunch - a surprising number of workers go home for lunch, and have a short siesta before going back to the grind until the evening. And another baking again in the evening. It looks a lot of bread, but in reality it is light and airy (and delicious).
    Real French bread often does not have all the additives that industrial bread uses, so it can go stale quickly - not a problem if you have soup of course. But fresh crisp bread is nice to dunk in to a good broth.
    A baguette is currently about €1.30 - that's 500gs/just over a lb. Most bakers also have smaller sizes, a common name, but by no means universal, is a ficille (lit. string) but there seems to be regional variations as to names. It's point and mumble shopping.
    Oh and wrapping comes in the form of a small 6x6 paper round the middle. I guess you are expected to take responsibility and keep your own food clean.
    Other types of bread are available, sourdough - levain, whole wheat - complet and others which I am sure you can discuss on site. I prefer my bread really crispy, so I ask for "un tradition, bien cuit" well cooked, which will have some dark highlights and crunchy crispy outside and big holes and a chewy crumb inside.

    Oh and don't be surprised if you get charged for having your selected loaf sliced for you. But not a baguette. That isn't done.


    Don't forget the seasonings. Brings out the sparkle in the fresh flavours.
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  13. Backcountry Bob

    Backcountry Bob Been here awhile

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    I,think they have bic lighters everywhere
    I ride a KLR 650 and I couldnt help but think you where a KLR guy as well when you said you still use a lighter you found with no fluid left that's a KLRista move of I've ever seen one.

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  14. scootac

    scootac Just a Traveler

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    :lol3
    That IS cheap!!!
  15. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    A 1979 guzzi since almost new - probably spent less per mile than most KLR riders.
    The BIC thing came about when the regular matches got damp enough to not work. Found the lighter, and, eureka!
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  16. tjzondrz

    tjzondrz Non-Nefarious

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    Don't forget Sumac.
    The RED berry Sumac. White berry Sumac is toxic.
  17. Imachimper

    Imachimper Gett'n crusty

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    I want this guy on my next trip. Watch in 4K if possible.
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  18. scootac

    scootac Just a Traveler

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    Looks tasty....but not very minimalist!
    I know I don't carry a mortar and pestle....
  19. nigelcorn

    nigelcorn Wannabe.

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    Seriously, he packs a TON of gear just to have the primitive/minimalist look. Enormous cutting board, comically and unnecessarily large knife, mortar/pestle, etc. Don't get me wrong, that looks amazing, but that is way too much effort just to look like a minimalist.
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  20. Zubb

    Zubb he went that-a-way...

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    I would call it Hoyty Toyty primitive. Not minimalist. And he should sharpen his knife.