Are you really an ADV rider?!

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by rd400racer, Mar 14, 2018.

  1. rd400racer

    rd400racer Long timer

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    That's the question I'm pondering now. I've had an older GS for 5 years now. I purchased it because I bought into the adventure lifestyle and thought I would travel all over the country on any terrain. Well, in those 5 years I crossed one creek at my MIL's. Big adventure.

    I pose this question because I'm at the home stretch on a new bike purchase. For over a year I've been pondering the choice between an S10 and another GS and all of the sudden I'm asking myself...why am I even looking at another one of these bikes when I don't even go off-road?

    Sure, they're very comfortable but the truth is you're giving up some highway comfort in wind protection etc. Why don't I just buy an FJR1300? I can still cross the occasional creek with that!


    Bottom line, I can't be the only person that lusts after an ADV bike but doesn't actually need one. Then again, probably 75% of the ADV bikes sold never leave the tarmac in the first place:D
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  2. djroszina

    djroszina Long timer

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    Looks, performance, comfort, price, reliability...find the bike that best addresses all those points for you personally, and that will be the bike that gives you the most satisfaction. It doesn't matter the genre as long as it delivers what your looking for. Asking for others to pick out a bike for you is like asking others to pick out your next wife...
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  3. rd400racer

    rd400racer Long timer

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    Not really what I'm asking, just curious if others have come to the realization that an ADV bike is more in your head because of the "Adventure" aspect as opposed to the actual usage. Whatever the next bike is that I get, it will be the 69th I've owned...picking out motorcycles has typically never been an issue with me:D
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  4. Yossarian™

    Yossarian™ Deputy Cultural Attaché

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    If you like visiting Starbucks, then I'd go with the GS. Otherwise, get what suits your riding.
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  5. rd400racer

    rd400racer Long timer

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    I never visited Starbucks once on my old GS:lol3
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  6. shoeb

    shoeb Long timer

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    'Adventure Bike' is a marketing term. If the machine fits your purpose, who cares what they call it?
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  7. Boondox

    Boondox Travels With Barley

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    75% of the time I spend on long trips (two weeks or more) are spent on pavement. But I really appreciate the freedom of taking forest service roads, exploring dirt roads to see where they go, and riding a bike so fugly I don't let worry about mud or scratches dictate my ride. And out west I really appreciate the nearly 9 gallon fuel tank of the GSA. Plus the ergonomics are perfect for me; it fits like a comfy old boot.
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  8. djroszina

    djroszina Long timer

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    I get cha, I'm a multi bike owner and have had an 1150 GS for 10 years and just traded towards a 1200GS. Now in the time I've owned the 1150 I've found myself way over my head in offroad, especially mud, so for the last few years I've also been riding a 650 Dakar single when more adventurous riding was anticipated. But I still love the 1200GS as my mostly pavement bike.
    #8
  9. Sleepyc

    Sleepyc I have a Moto Boner!

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    Pretend ADVrider didn't exist and you didn't have instant access to ride reports of people traveling the world on motorcycles. What bike would you want?

    I'm doing my best to fulfill the style of riding I want to do, not what this site tells me to do or is "Cool". I have bikes that I personally like.

    Get off the internet for a month or so... and look at motorcycles. Which one tickles your motoboner... that's the one you really want and it most likely will fulfill your actual motorcycling needs.

    Also, adventure in no way means "Off road". Ever been to Detroit in the past 10 years?? Ride a moped around 6 mile or 8 mile, and that will give you more adventure cred than a dude on a GS in Africa.
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  10. Schmokel

    Schmokel I got peed on today.

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  11. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    At first I thought this thread would devolve into a debate similar to the pundits who believe you have to have a DSLR in order to be considered a "serious photographer".

    Any bike is an adventure bike if you're willing to leave the driveway on it and go experience new things. I just returned from Guatemala to Texas on a 2015 GSA but I could have easily had the same or better experience on a KLR. There was a significant portion of central Guatemala, in the highlands, which was dirt/sand.....but that's not why I bought the GSA (my second).

    It's hardly ever about the motorcycle, which is just a tool. People who argue about "best bike" are typically focused upon what others think about them and not on what's most important in the end, which is did you take advantage of the opportunity to go have adventures when the opportunities presented themselves. That question is one everybody gets to answer in the silence of their own mind.
    #11
  12. ydarg

    ydarg Miscreant

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    ADV bike is like a pickup truck you buy as your sole DD (I'm guilty of that too). I don't or need a car and a truck, so I'd rather have the truck. Same with the bike.

    90% of the time it's empty but it's great to have when I need it.
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  13. dddd

    dddd Long timer

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    so take a street bike and adv-ize it.
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  14. BetterLateThanNever

    BetterLateThanNever Long timer

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    Who cares if it makes you happy? And who cares what we think? And who has the authority to define "need" anyway? You earned your bike, and it's nobody's business what you do with it or like about it.

    If tomorrow the government created the Ministry of Appropriate Motorcycles, I'd bet 90% of the people on this board would see changes in their garages.
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  15. mylastbike

    mylastbike Been here awhile

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    Who gives a rat's ass what the name of a bike's category is? Buy whatever bike you want regardless of what the industry says you should be doing with the bike. Plenty of folks buy "ADV" bikes but never get off the pavement because they make f'in great touring bikes.

    Before I ever heard the term Adventure riding or came across this forum, I was drawn simply to the looks of ADV bikes. I love the rugged, utilitarian, military-esque aesthetics. So that's my first reason for riding an ADV bike. The bikes look cool I think.

    Secondly, I like the practicality of them, they're the Swiss army knife of motorcycles. While I don't go off the pavement often, I like knowing my bike can handle it with ease should the need arise. And as my off-road skills progress I'll ride on the dirt more and more. Yes, I know you probably have that friend who rides his Hardley-Ableson on the dirt all the time and he'll say that you can take any bike off the pavement but street-oriented bikes are still not as well-suited to the dirt as an ADV bike. It's a fact.

    The third main reason why I'm drawn to ADV bikes is the type of folks they tend to attract. The people I meet at ADV riding events or those simply riding ADV styled bikes are more my style. I've ridden with all types of people on all types of bikes and I don't find them all agreeable to me. I just don't align well with your typical street bike stunta or cruiser-faced pirates. (I know I'm playing into the stereotypes but stereotypes exist for a reason. I am your stereotypical Starbucks latte-sipping schmuck riding an ADV bike after all :lol3).

    With all that said, I'll never ride my bike in the wilds of Africa let alone the Trans-America-Trail. I'll be lucky to get away for a weekend trip once a year. So on paper I don't need an ADV bike but I'll continue to ride/buy one for the reasons stated above. Most would label me an ADV poseur in my Klim gear (they make good sh!t) and dual sport helmet (looks cool) when most of my riding is commuting. I'll just be grinning behind the steam rising up from my grande mocha latte enjoying life while other people consume themselves with trivialities of motorcycle category naming conventions.

    This is a great discussion topic by the way, and I truly don't intend to offend anyone. The comments stated above are simply my two cents and meant as a conversation
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  16. tlub

    tlub Long timer

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    All bikes are adventure bikes. Depends on what you do with them. I rode my R75/5 a lot in the Mojave desert in the late 70s, just to go camping where I felt like it. When they came out with the GS it made a lot of sense. But my R75/5 could do what I wanted. I still have it.
    I think the R1200GS is the best touring bike BMW makes. It does everything the RT does, but is about 100lb lighter and can go on more roads. Don't think you have to go off road. There is a reason why the GS, and GS derivatives, are in the top finishers Iron Butt rally. It's not their off-road ability. It's the ability to easily eat miles. Buy it for that if you want it. Don't worry about the image.
    Think of the GS like the R90S, from a marketing point of view. In both cases, BMW has sold people the bike they really wanted, in the guise of what they thought they wanted, and made customers happy and themselves rich. In the case of the R90S, it was marketed as a near race bike, but was really a great sport touring bike. In the case of the GS, it's marketed as an ADV bike (which it is, in a heavy sort of way), but is really a great...wait for the drum roll... a great sport touring bike. Notice the similarity?
    #16
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  17. OrangeYZ

    OrangeYZ Long timer

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    I thought I was, but it turns out I'm a dirt biker who happens to like dirt biking for hundreds of miles at a time and sometimes on the street
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  18. mylastbike

    mylastbike Been here awhile

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    I am guilty as charged!
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  19. ArmyStrong

    ArmyStrong 6F

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    When/if I go off road just about any kind of bike could follow. I bought my 1200GSA because it was the best bike for me. Super comfy, can pack it like a mule (I camp a lot), does everything really well, great range so rest stops are often sitting by a stream versus a gas station and no aches an pains (bad back). Every trip I make is an adventure, but that has nothing to do with what bike I have.
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  20. LApilot

    LApilot Been here awhile

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    This is me too. We need to get our own hashtag and start a support group. What I mean is that since I sold the Gold Wing, I am no longer a street rider. Since I sold the KTM200, I am no longer an enduro racer. Since I sold the KTM300, I am no longer a desert racer. All I have left is a KTM500. Am I an adventure rider? I mean, I do load it up with bags and do some bike camping on it, but I also like to single track it too. I prefer to spend 80% of my time on the dirt and not the asphalt, but I don't mind 200 to 250 mile days that include a fair amount of pavement if the goal is to get somewhere interesting. So if the Question is, "Am I really and ADV rider?", then the answer I guess is, I don't know! Is my bike too small to qualify?
    #20
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