Garmin Montana

Discussion in 'Mapping & Navigation' started by AugustFalcon, May 18, 2011.

  1. Emmbeedee

    Emmbeedee Procrastinators

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    You may need to download and use Javawa Device Manager to ‘Enable map visibility in Basecamp’.

    I don’t know why, but many maps need that tweak to be seen by Bc.


    Sent from my iPhone
  2. B.O.C.I.U.S.

    B.O.C.I.U.S. n00b

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    No screen protectors on both.

    Software version is the same - 7.40

    600 i own from new and 650 i bought just week ago, a little bit used
  3. Yossarian™

    Yossarian™ Deputy Cultural Attaché

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    The Montana has a microSD slot underneath the battery.
  4. txmxrider

    txmxrider Adventurer

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  5. txmxrider

    txmxrider Adventurer

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    No go. I was able to download City Navigator 2019.1 to the Montana and to Basecamp but Basecamp still has that same origami look and does not show any dirt roads. I'm about to give up on Basecamp and see if there's something better. Google Earth shows the dirt roads, just not sure yet if I can move .gpx files to/from the Montana using Goggle Earth.
  6. guavadude

    guavadude Dirt Nap Enthusiast

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    Basecamp is what you need, trust me. There’s a bit of a learning curve. You also just need to get the CNNA installed into BC and you’ll see plenty of dirt roads. You don’t even need topo maps, CNNA is that complete.
    Call Garmin and have their techs help you. Hard to troubleshoot like this and they’ll take you through it. I think Tech support team is the best thing about Garmin.

    Also watch some tutorials on BC. Learn how to organize gpx files, how to create routes and then convert those to tracks and how to transfer files to and from the unit. It’s a great tool, stick with it.

    Google maps do look much better. I use GM to explore and get ideas, search for stuff etc. Then I use BC to create the routes, convert to tracks and organize.
    Magile and Timmer like this.
  7. ohgood

    ohgood Just givver tha berries !!!

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    There are lots of route planners online that suck exponentially less than basecamp.

    Gpx is just a standard file type, you can plan a route and export the gpx from all the great planners/plotters.

    Heck even do it on your tablet/phone, then copy all the tracks you need to the Montana's sdcard.

    No big deal, and a lot less pita than basecamp.
  8. guavadude

    guavadude Dirt Nap Enthusiast

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    While there are a lot of different ways to deal with gpx files I still think knowing how to use Basecamp is the way to go for several reasons.

    1) Organization. By using playlists and folders you can easily keep track of the mountain of data your unit will be creating. I have folders for each state, ride, region, country etc. I have multiple playlists of the same data...some with just tracks so I can see with less clutter, some with just waypoints so I can keep a master list of waypoints for gas, food, lodging and add them to whatever ride I’m doing.

    I’ve yet to see any other app that lets me accomplish this, and I’ve tried a lot of them.

    2) Maps. Whatever map you’re using in Basecamp will also be the map loaded in your unit. I use Google for its excellent terrain and Sat views but I create routes in Basecamp so that WYSIWYG. Also I can color code tracks in BC and they are the same on the unit. It all works together as a system.

    3) Loading. Quick easy uploads and downloads to and from the unit. Quick backups since it’s all there on your computer. Built in checking for software updates for the unit. All stuff you’ll need at some point anyway.

    4) Tech Support. I can’t call the guys at any of these 3rd party apps and ask any questions when I’m having an isssue. Garmin’s tech support is great even if you disagree with company policies.

    I’m not saying Garmin and Basecamp are perfect by any means. And if you’re just creating and moving around a few gpx files it doesn’t matter what you use.
    But saying there are easier ways of accomplishing ALL of the above other than using Basecamp, I think is incorrect.

    Watch a few of the short Garmin tutorials. Learn how to organize using lists. The data in the lists are aliases so be careful when editing and use duplicate when you want to change something and keep the original waypoint/track/route intact.

    Create routes then create tracks from those routes and you’ll have tracks that follow the curves of the road and are easy to read on the trail.

    Learn how to create routes in the unit and how to use a phone app so you can tweak during the trip.

    And most of all, don’t stare at the gps while riding! Pull over if needed and ride safe.
  9. ohgood

    ohgood Just givver tha berries !!!

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    1a) organization is a breeze. turn on/off visibility of thousands of miles of tracks in seconds. import / export in seconds, even edit it right there on the device. same database/directory structure for maps and waypoints. suuuper fast and easy.
    Screenshot_2018-02-07-15-10-32.png Screenshot_2018-02-07-15-10-45.png Screenshot_2018-02-07-15-11-11.png

    1b) i've found one !

    2) map type isn't an issue here. the map works independently of the routing data. this was a second huge selling point for getting away from basecamp. changing the map doesn't screw up the route. i love this.

    3) 10,000 miles takes about ten seconds to display. writing to an sdcard so the garmin oregon can see them is easy, but annoying that they can't accept stuff over wifi/bluetooth like the rest of the world.

    4) hmm, i might be spoiled here. maybe i'll need tech support some day.

    5) i can guarantee it's much easier this way than with basecamp. suuuuper easy. fast too !

    6) my current app only edits temp files instead of killing the original when a mistake is made in the process. i do remember the annoyance level of doing that in basecamp though. sheesh !

    7) route vs track doesn't matter in my user space. creating/using either and it just stays as it should. now, i have to make sure it's a track when i push things to the garmins sdcard, but here it's all good.

    8) been doing this a while too.

    9) absolutely !
  10. guavadude

    guavadude Dirt Nap Enthusiast

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    You never said what app that is. I’m all up for trying new things. I’m a Mac guy and seems like a lot of the better, newer apps are Android or PC only. I’m not opposed to grabbing a cheap tablet or something but can’t change my world around entirely for routing.

    I’ve just seen several times where someone says try this app and I do and then they fold and it’s no longer supported. Or something like Furkot which could be good but there’s so much extra crap to wade through and no organization.
  11. txmxrider

    txmxrider Adventurer

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    Maybe I'm overlooking the obvious here. I keep seeing references to CNNA, which I assume is City Navigator North America, and I assumed that is what I downloaded (City Navigator 2019.1) . You folks have been very kind to stick with me through this. I appreciate the info. I think I will call the Garmin support people and just bounce it off them. I refuse to be defeated by this wonky map!
  12. guavadude

    guavadude Dirt Nap Enthusiast

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    You can either buy the downloadable maps from Garmin which can be installed on your computer AND your unit. Or you buy a map on an SD card which only works on the unit or on the computer in Basecamp when it's plugged in. I have read that you can copy the SD card to a disk image and then Basecamp will use that without the unit being plugged in.

    You can either buy the maps with or without a lifetime update. So just downloading the latest map from Garmin doesn't mean much if you don't have a license to be able to use that update and if you don't know how to install that update. Calling Garmin will sort it out. Explain that you bought the unit second hand and are just trying to get it to work. Often they'll comp you a new license, sometimes they'll want you to buy the license again.

    It's my understanding that one of the benefits of using the SD card is that you can move it from unit to unit and not have to relicense. I've only ever purchased the downloads. I have had to get Garmin to relicense the downloads when I've switched units on a warranty issue. They're pretty helpful but I'm not a fan of them constantly trying to sell maps that I think should come with it anyways. As you've noticed, if CNNA isn't loaded, the unit and Basecamp are useless.
  13. Aces 6

    Aces 6 Whiskey Tango Foxtrot, Over

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    Looking at buying the 680T. Instead of drudging through 746 pages.....

    Do you need the battery in the Garmin to run it off the bike battery/PC8?

    Most lithium batteries have a "do not exceed XX temp" and with the Garmin being exposed to the sun in summer could easily exceed 115-120F.

    Thanks in advance
  14. Emmbeedee

    Emmbeedee Procrastinators

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    There's no need to have the battery in the unit; some people run it that way. But there's also no reason to worry about the battery. If it's too hot out, it just won't charge. No damage done.
    Aces 6 likes this.
  15. guavadude

    guavadude Dirt Nap Enthusiast

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    i like having the battery in so I can look over routes during lunch breaks.
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  16. ohgood

    ohgood Just givver tha berries !!!

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    You gotta heat sink glued to your back or something? How do you do anything in 120 heat?
    Aces 6 likes this.
  17. Emmbeedee

    Emmbeedee Procrastinators

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    I think having a battery also prevents track data corruption in case the power is shut off inadvertently.
    Aces 6 likes this.
  18. wbbnm

    wbbnm Long timer

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    Yeah, I always run with the battery. I have never noticed an overheating problem. Losing all power suddenly is surely going to put the software in some undesirable states.
    Plus running with the battery keeps it charged.

    I have never had any problems running with the battery. I have used the same battery for 4 years with no issues.
    Aces 6 likes this.
  19. Aces 6

    Aces 6 Whiskey Tango Foxtrot, Over

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    Very very slowly....
    Many a shitty time in a M1 tank stateside in the Great Plains or Mojave with temps at 120F. Dog it sucked....but kept the lbs off :lol3
    The easiest things took a lot of focus and energy.

    Thanks for all the feedback. Pulled the trigger --in the mail.
    Emmbeedee likes this.
  20. abruzzi

    abruzzi Long timer

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    While I've ridden in 115f heat, objects outside, in the sun can easily get much hotter--150 or more. I make sure to mount my GPS where the air can hit it when I ride so it can cool off a bit.
    Aces 6 and ohgood like this.