How much does all your gear weigh?

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by DOCsprocket, Jan 13, 2011.

  1. DOCsprocket

    DOCsprocket Sprocket

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    I'm revamping my 2003 F650gs with new suspension. It now has a fork stolen from a 2002 Yamaha YZ 426, and I'm in the process of ordering a new, longer Hyperpro rear shock from EPM. All of this is in preparation for an on-road/off-road trip next year from Portland, OR to Panama and back one year from now. The dudes making my custom rear shock need to know how much my gear weighs, and I just don't really know. My Jesse cases alone weigh 26lbs. I'll carry a tent, sleeping bag and Thermarest, as well as some very basic cooking stuff. I am a light traveller (pronounced "grungy") in terms of clothing. But it'd be helpful to hear what other people average on longer trips.
    #1
  2. Jamie Z

    Jamie Z I'm serious.

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    I'm a fairly light traveler--your self description sounds a lot like me--and though I haven't directly weighed my motorcycle kit, I think somewhere around 50 lbs is a good estimate.

    I'm basing my guess on two specific examples: On a hiking trip my backpack weighed 42 lbs. On a cross-country bicycle trip, my bike weighed 77 lbs before heading out. subtracting the weight of the bicycle and I'm guessing I had a bit more than 50 lbs worth of stuff.

    On the motorcycle, I'm very slightly less concerned about weight, so I tend to carry a few more consumables. Roughly speaking, all my gear (including a store of food and water) would probably go between 40 and 50 lbs, occasionally a bit more if I choose to carry my laptop or a few canned goods.

    Jamie
    #2
  3. rufusswan

    rufusswan Been here awhile

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    50 lbs. seems reasonable to me. Easy enough to get a cardboard box and actually weigh the stuff though. Rider is wearing some lbs. and you might have additional stuff other than clothes, cook & sleep gear, so add for cameras, computers etc. Food and beer is extra weighty so add a bit more.

    I'd just consider the weight to be about the same as a chick on the pillion and call it 110-125 max.
    #3
  4. thetourist

    thetourist Just passing thru

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    There was a thread on this about a year ago.

    I've weighed my stuff. 26 lbs for each side luggage, including luggage.

    Top box - 25 lbs. Smaller tank bag 6 lbs.

    Small duffel - 10 lbs

    Then I always stuff a few more things in, so call it 100 - 125 lbs.

    I tend to carry a lot of tools and plenty of cold weather gear.
    #4
  5. bikerfish

    bikerfish flyfishandride

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    I had a custom hagon shock built for me last year, told them 25 pounds each pannier, 40lbs on the back rack , I also told them I carry a tank bag, side pannier tank bags, and 9 gallons of gas. that plus the weight of my girlfriend. shock came out perfect, with middle of the road settings, it's pretty stiff for just me, but when loaded down two up battle touring, it's perfect.
    very worthwhile taking the time to get one built for your needs
    #5
  6. basketcase

    basketcase lifelong reject fixer

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    The morning I loaded the bike to get on the CDT in Silver City, NM I weighed all my stuff. Somewhere I have the notes on the total. My recollection is that it was entirely too much junk... but the total weight was around what thetourist got for his (i.e, two posts up from mine). If I can put my hands on the notes I'll come back and post my actual weights.

    Anyway, tallying load you are looking at rider weight plus his/her gear, and then the weight of the racks, the bags, tools, food, clothing, spare parts, water, extra fuel -- basically, anything you plan to carry. Even the tie down straps add something to the gross weight.

    Via edit -

    Okay, this discussion popped up on an Alert so I (1) remembered it, and (2) went back and looked at my notes.

    Excluding me and my riding apparel at 215 lbs, the day I left for the CDT ride I had 85 lbs of gear and supplies on board. As time passed that payload lessened as I chunked unnecessary stuff, ate the foods I carried, and generally culled it down to what I actually needed.

    As an aside note, the DR650 specs a GVWR of 770 lbs. Adding the bike weight to that of the rider (me) and the gear together put the total at 635 lbs, or 82.47% of capacity. In other words, I could have crammed another 135 lbs on the little sucker and still been legal.

    As you were -
    #6
  7. smilin jack

    smilin jack Grandpa Adventurer

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    Stopped at a public scales with the DR650 the other day to weigh the bike.

    650 pounds with day trip gear and me
    450 pounds with bike and day trip gear (I got off the scales and left bike on the scales)

    I weigh 180 pounds, so helmet, boots and riding suit must be about 20 pounds.

    No wonder the bike feels heavier than 330 pounds that's published.

    For camp trips, there is a tent, sleeping bag, thermo-rest pad, small cook kit and some food. Never weighed it but must be 100 pounds... maybe more?

    Dave
    #7
  8. RVDan

    RVDan Long timer

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    I weighed everything last time I was out, 80 lbs between my top bag and saddlebags, including the saddlebags and top bag.
    #8
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  9. jsb223

    jsb223 ADV Rookie

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    138lbs but I pack too much crap...
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  10. shu

    shu ...

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    40- 60 pounds of gear (camping, clothes, etc) depending on the season. In winter it is closer to the 60.

    10 - 15 pounds for riding gear (helmet, etc)

    10 - 20 pounds for tools and spare parts, tubes, etc. depending on where I'm going.

    20 pounds more if I'm carrying a tire.

    So.........about 60 pounds for comfortable, well equipped riding/camping in the summer and up to 115 pounds if carrying parts and tires somewhere far away.


    ........shu
    #10
  11. dutchjohn

    dutchjohn Adventure Touring

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    with me and all my junk full of bas water food .you know the kitchen sink
    loaded !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!:evil:evil:evil:evil
    #11
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  12. Utah Bones

    Utah Bones Gas X ready!

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    HolyCOW! :lol3
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  13. TravisGill

    TravisGill Been here awhile

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    [​IMG]

    I'm right at 100 lbs with soft bags and gear (not including me and my riding gear):
    Front panniers: bike cover, helmet cover, and cold weather gear.
    Tank bag: glasses, maps, bug-spray, sunscreen, earplugs, camera, Gerber tool, headlamp, flashlight, bandana.
    Left back pannier: camp chair, Mavic pro drone, clothing, Keen shoes, and food.
    Right back pannier: spare tubes (x2), compressor, spare parts, jump-start battery, and camping stuff.
    Tail bag: tarp, toiletries, sleeping pad, sleeping bag, camp pillow, and 3-man tent.
    Tool tube: tools and tire levers.
    1.75 gal Rotopax (100 lbs does not include fuel or water weight)
    #13
  14. The lone burro

    The lone burro Adventurer

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    The only way to do it right this is to pack your bags like you're ready to go do a dry run whether you do it in your backyard or you do it down the road. Run multiple scenarios as if it's raining cold hot anything that could go wrong will go wrong take into conderation food everything, anything less you're asking for trouble
    #14
  15. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    Approx 80 pounds including the luggage. Usually for one up riding/touring one would get a spring with an adjustable pre-load of approx. 100 pounds of your riding weight.
    For example:
    If you weigh 175 pounds in your riding clothes (complete) you would want a 175/275 spring.....because you won't always be packed for travel.
    If you can't get that err on the upper end and at least get a spring to carry 100 pounds more than your solo riding weight.
    #15
  16. basketcase

    basketcase lifelong reject fixer

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    Bejeebus dutchjohn! I bet every time you get on that thing the shocks wail "one at at time, please!!!"

    :lol3
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  17. bigphish

    bigphish Curiously Satisfying

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    I just got home from a 3 and half week 12 state excursion camping half the time
    26.5 lbs per side case ( Hepco Becker Gobi's )
    Medium Moto Fizz 18 lbs
    small tank bag maybe a pound
    Still took a few things I did not use, but I never learn
    Ha
    #17
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  18. VStromNC

    VStromNC DNS/DNF

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    I probably had about 100 lbs of gear, tools and stuff for the portion of the Eastern TAT that I did in early June. I learned a lot about packing. Didn't need all the tools and stuff either. I brought new inner tubes, patch kits, tire irons, etc., but no one in our riding group even got a flat!:dirtdog

    I will also mount my 2 gal Rotopax differently as I had to basically unload everything to use the Rotopax. I think my tools weighed almost 25 pounds or so.

    [​IMG]
    #18
  19. The lone burro

    The lone burro Adventurer

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    You need to rethink your gear. Instead of a poly sleeping bag go to a down bag. Lower your center of gravity. You'll enjoy your ride more than you can imagine. Been through it


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    #19
  20. basketcase

    basketcase lifelong reject fixer

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    I agree with lone burro about rethinking the packing.

    Also, I would encourage you to keep the tire tools on board. To wit - me repairing a tire the 2nd time on the same day, somewhere north of Steamboat Springs, CO when riding the CDT in 2010.

    [​IMG]

    If you don't have a flat then the stuff of course seems useless, but if you do have a flat the things you listed are the very things you need to have.

    My buddy and I were both on DR650's and split the tools and spare parts load for weight and general purposes.
    #20