I thought I had my choice (Montana), but no BT?

Discussion in 'GPS 101 - Which GPS For Me' started by Eidmantas, Nov 12, 2017.

  1. Eidmantas

    Eidmantas n00b

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    Hello there,

    I am looking for a dedicated/always on bike GPS, since I do not want to use a phone. I also have a mate who wants to use his phone as GPS all the time.

    I looked at Oregon, Etrex, Montana. Thought that the Montana 610 would be perfect for me and yet, it has no BT (even at 2017?) while the other units mostly do. As I understand with the Garmin Mobile Connect app you could transfer GPX files (share them with your riding colleagues like that throughout various units) and such.

    So what's the next best choice? I figured just to take something else until the Montana gets updated, but it seems like there are no powered mounts apart from the Montana for bikes. I primarily drive offroad. (no zumo). Take something like an eTrex touch and buy lots of batteries? More stuff to worry about...

    Found this: might be the solution https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.carlopescio.uploader&hl=lt

    TYVM!
    #1
  2. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

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    Garmin Monterra. Main thread link HERE but there are many others. Just use the Search function.

    Though for the life of me I don't understand why you don't want to use your phone.
    #2
    Eidmantas likes this.
  3. Eidmantas

    Eidmantas n00b

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    Thanks Drone, I will checkout the Monterra.

    Being an IT dude, me too ;). But hey, I just want a device which would always be on the bike, always plugged. Phone is being constantly used for other ways, I don't want to micromanage many devices. Cheers.
    #3
  4. Dorito

    Dorito Dreamer and Doer

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    The montana 600 can send waypoints and gpx files wirelessly to another Montana unit with no additional apps.

    I have a small herd of GPS, and for off road, Montana rules. The feature i love is that it will display waypoints that are not on either my current track or route. Nice if you want mark places to eat or fuel up etc for locations that are not on your route.

    It is also nice to be able to have a waypoint showing to mark trail dangers, when navigating tracks (eg steep, or water hole).
    #4
  5. dnrobertson

    dnrobertson Big Bike, Slow Rider

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    Garmin Zumo (I have the 590, now the 595) have BT.

    My Zumo does tracks, music (I think, never used it) and I do know it connects to the Garmin App.

    I think Garmin regard the Montana range as a handheld device so it doesn't need BT.
    #5
  6. Grinnin

    Grinnin Forever N00b

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    You'll probably wait a long time for the Montana to get bluetooth. They could have included it 6 years ago but didn't. They could have added it in last year's update but didn't. (Or was it longer than a year? Recent anyway.)

    I think it's just not what they plan for an outdoor GPS where you're presumably listening to the birds.
    #6
  7. ohgood

    ohgood Just givver tha berries !!!

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    1 why not? it has everything you asked about, and isn't hamstringed by "Bluetooth to other compatible hiking devices".
    2 normal, I've been doing this for years.
    3 that unit is sold to the " I don't want no stinking Bluetooth !" crowd.
    4 you know there is a difference between Bluetooth the rest of the world uses, access what Garmin calls Bluetooth, right ? phone/tablet/computer Bluetooth is pretty straight forward. Garmin quote unquote Bluetooth only works with specified devices in the same activity line, and then only for agpx file... for other devices it's for pairing for phone/music, but you really need to see the threads about the insane pairing annoyances associated with Garmin stuff.

    5 your friend probably tried to show you already

    6 don't hold your breath

    7 me too, it's a hoot! recording tracks, editing tracks, sharing waypoints/routes/ tracks (over not just Bluetooth but also Wi-Fi direct, android beam, sdcard, usb-otg, etc) or even full 4gb map files is trivial. in the last few years of riding off road I haven't broken a phone, or had a GPS issue. tight woods, tight trees, no cellular, it all works fine.
    Screenshot_2017-11-13-07-29-57.png

    8 the folks that I know carry aa batteries, I just carry a charging brick for when we get to camp. the battery life is plenty good unless you're planning on being on the interstate droning an iron butt plaque, and then you can just plug it into the luxo liner anyway...
    Screenshot_2017-11-12-19-52-35.png

    9 sounds dreamy, I don't think that's something that works.
    #7
  8. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

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    Sounds like you are confusing your personal smart phone (the one you use for everything) with "a" smart phone that stays on the bike, always plugged, and is used as a GPS. In other words, a 2nd phone. This one would not have a cell phone plan so you can't use it for phone calls or text messages or for any over-the-road data purposes. But it would have WiFi which is what you would use for downloading the nav apps you want to try and the maps you want to carry on the phone's memory card.

    My choice? I'm one of the thousands who chose this one ---->
    But if you want to pay a lot more for a Monterra, and don't mind the tiny screen, and don't mind paying through the nose for maps (most cell phone map updates are free), and don't mind being restricted to using ONLY Garmin maps, then go for it.

    My regular phone is a Moto Z. That one stays asleep inside a zipped jacket pocket whenever I'm riding.
    #8
  9. steve connelly

    steve connelly Stevo

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    Ohgood, what App do you use on your phone?
    #9
  10. ohgood

    ohgood Just givver tha berries !!!

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    @steve connelly for dual sport , street and dirt I use Locus Pro, but there is a free version. it's a STEEP LEARNING CURVE at the beginning, so I usually recommend Osmand as a starter. the main selling point of locus is it's incredible database for handling tons of tracks and waypoints.
    #10
  11. wavehog3

    wavehog3 KTM_Ken

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    Readons to consider the Monterra:

    1) The Monterra is an Android device, so you get the features of the Montana with the ability to run Android Apps (nav, email, browser, photo upload, etc.).

    2) It has a decent 8 MG camera, Bluetooth, WiFi and the ability to use all of the Montana mounts.

    3) It isn't hamstrung by temp issues for charging like some cell phones or the less than rugged charge connector.

    4) Garmin maps can be spendy, but the Monterra lets you use Google Maps, Kurviger (my favorite) and other nav options in offline mode. You get the bonus of pinch and screen tap to zoom in and out with your gloves on!! Even guide gear snowboard gloves.

    5) Use Bluetooth to connect to a headset if you have it (music, audio from apps, etc.).

    6) Mount options are secure and relatively inexpensive. I run one on the dirt bike and it performs flawlessly in rugged, nasty and abusive terrain. Switch it to the snow bike with the push off a release button and it helps keep you out of arbitrary wilderness boundaries, avoid prohibited trails and navigate back to the trailhead after hours of uninhibited riding. Finally, switch to the street bike and kick on the tunes while using Kurviger to navigate all the twistys far from cell phone coverage.

    Since it isn't cell, your are limited to following a track and pre-planned route vs. real time in device routing (at least with non-Garmin mapping).

    I use my mobile phone to plan and manage routes where I don't have access to WiFi, but otherwise you can do all of that on the Monterra. There are simple Bluetooth apps that let you share anything between phone and Monterra in seconds.

    Once set, you can put phone in airplane mode and run all day with the Monterra in a reliable powered and secure cradle that mounts easily in landscape mode right between the bar clamps.

    +1 for Monterra as a GPS choice...

    That said, I am playing with the Voyager Pro. Having the buddy tracking feature will be a big bonus when riding with inexperienced riders and keeping tabs of each other on the snow bike.
    #11