Less Is More - Sold our home, sold our stuff.... Going on an adventure

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by Moose_DK, Dec 5, 2016.

  1. Moose_DK

    Moose_DK Been here awhile

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    It was time to put up the motorcycles for sale (visiting Guayaquil)
    December 17, 2017
    We packed our motorcycles and left Montanita and the beach

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    We had rented a room in an apartment in the northern part Guayaquil, not because we wanted to visit Guayaquil, but because Esbens computer was getting really sick and shutting down all the time. Without Esbens computer we would not be able to edit our pictures for the blog, and without any pictures the blog would be really boring. Esben had found a Lenovo service center, and we hoped that they could help.

    On the way to Guayaquil I had to fix my headset. I only had sound in the right side of the helmet, and going 55 miles an hour on the freeway, I was having a hard time hearing Esben. During lunch I look the helmet apart, and luckily it was just a plug that had come apart, so it was easy to put it together again.

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    Not even after 2 weeks of relaxing in Montanita could rise our joy for travelling on the motorcycles. Esben was feeling better, but just after one day of riding he felt tired again. We knew that something had to be done if we wanted to continue our adventure. We felt that we have tried pretty much everything on this trip to make sure that Esben could get enough relaxation and sleep, but still is was only enough to survive. We didn’t have any more energy for new adventures. So we took the decision to put up the motorcycles for sale. We used half a day just finding the right pictures, writing an informal text and posting the sales add all relevant places online. We also visited the Lenovo service center, but they didn’t have the spare part (a new motherboard) for Esbens computer, because it was to old (1.5 yesrs!!). We left with the computer, and the service center would be in touch when they got the spare part.

    In the mean time we spend time at the apartment, were we had rented a room on Airbnb. The apartment was in a closed community and we could use the pool and a small gym. Trying to exercise and eat healthy to built up energy for new adventures.

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    Going for a walk in the community, where a snail was enjoying the sprinklers

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    We had good response on the sales add for the motorcycles, but we had one condition, which was that we wanted to sell them as a pair. Trying to find two different people from two different countries, and were could we meet, it was just really hard. Then others were interested in buying them in December 2017 or January 2018, and in the situation we were in, we didn’t wanted to spend 3 months more travelling on the motorcycles. At the end we were contacted by a company called ADV Factory, who offered to buy the motorcycles in Santiago de Chile. They would pay us 6000 USD and include 3 weeks rental of two motorcycles in Central Asia. We accepted the offer.

    Still having some days left in the apartment, and we were waiting to hear from the Lenovo service center, we spend time on planning the ride from Guayaquil, Ecuador to Santiago, Chile. We had to drive 5000 km, and we estimated that we could do 500 km a day, which is 10 days, but we also had two border crossings, so we added two extra days. In total 12 days and went grocery shopping for the next 10-12 days.

    So much bread – so many choices

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    We never heard from the Lenovo service center, so all that was left, was to pack everything on the motorcycles for the last time

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    I took us 16 minutes to put all the luggage on the motorcycles, after all the bags were already packed (the upper picture) – but we speeded the work up for you, enjoy!


    We were ready to leave Guayaquil – I know what you are thinking… “Didn’t they visit Guayaquil at all?” Yes, we did… huge celebrations was going on in Guayaquil, because they were celebrating Independence (9th of October) and Dia de la Raza (12th of October). We spend one day in Guayaquil – read more about it in the next post, before we head out on the 5000 km to Santiago de Chile.
    scudo, Max Wedge, Todd157k and 3 others like this.
  2. Moose_DK

    Moose_DK Been here awhile

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    scudo, Max Wedge, Todd157k and 4 others like this.
  3. adventurebound9517

    adventurebound9517 Been here awhile

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    Very cool video. I have throughley enjoyed your RR and not surprised that the fun is gone. I hope that Esben continues to feel better and please move this to the INMATES section when it won't work as a RR. Your writing and pictures have been great and I wish you two the best in your future travels.

    Phillip
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  4. Johnnydarock

    Johnnydarock Been here awhile

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    You might have a tough time selling the bikes in South America but if you get stuck you can go to one of two "duty free" zones in Chile where you can legally sell the bikes. One is in the north at a place called Iquique and the other is in the very south called Punta Arenas. I have not personally done this but this is what I've read/heard. I'm sure you can find out if it's true...and easy to do. I heard you can get a reasonable price as well...because its "legal". Good luck. John
  5. jwc

    jwc Ready to go

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    I have really enjoyed you RR. Good luck on the
    sale of your bikes and your future adventure however you decide to make it.
  6. Photowriter

    Photowriter Been here awhile

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    Fantastic photos, excellent and professional reporting (especially the fact finding and the economics of travels in your area).

    I really appreciate the effort you have put down in telling us about your travels.

    You have enlightened our days and I do wish you all the best for your future travels.

    God jul og godt nytår!
  7. hundo

    hundo n00b

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    So sad, I was living vicariously through this thread and will miss it. I hope the next phase of the adventures find you healthy and happy.
  8. DunkingBird

    DunkingBird Been here awhile

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    Isn't that a wonderful translation of your moto?
    On the other hand, the snail didn't sell its home :lol2

  9. Minister1955

    Minister1955 n00b

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    Subscribed
  10. HandCanonShootr

    HandCanonShootr Been here awhile

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    Awesome pics! great narrative, add some hiking & camping, GREAT!

    Mike B.
  11. Moose_DK

    Moose_DK Been here awhile

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    Thanks. Even though the bikes are now sold we will continue the blog. I think that when we post the last motorcycle post in this rr we will make sure to make a continuation in inmate section.
    Even though we are now in a van we hope we can still give you all some good stories and a bit of info to those of you who are in the planning stages of your trip.

    Oh and merry Christmas



  12. Moose_DK

    Moose_DK Been here awhile

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    Celebrating Independence day and Dia de la Raza (Guayaquil)
    December 20, 2017
    The parade had already started, when we came to the center of Guayaquil

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    Later the floats of beautiful decorated vehicles game

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    Guayaquil is hot, noisy and chaotic with a population of 2.4 million people. The headlight was not the parade, but the Parque Bolivar Area were land iguanas live downtown.

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    There was a fence to keep to people away from the iguanas, but the iguanas just walk wherever they want. They are really easy to touch.

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    More and more people gathered in the downtown, so we decided to walk to the mangrove-covered Santay Island which is located a few kilometers south of downtown. We got hungry on the way, and stopped for lunch at a local place.

    Some kind of fish soup, and off course Esben had to taste the homemade hot sauce – Super delicious

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    To get to the island we walked across a 840 meters long vehicle-free bridge – it is beautiful and worth a visit

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    The island has an area of 2.179 hectares where 56 families inhabit (210 people approximately), distributed in Ecoaldeas (the eco-village in the left picture). In October 2000 the island was declared wetland of Ecuador, and since February 20, 2010, the Island became a Protected Area and is part of the National System of Protected Areas as a National Recreational Area.

    In 1940, the Island stood out for its rice and cattle production. From the middays of 1990, the Ecological Committee of the Coast, environmental non-governmental organization of Guayaquil, carried out an organizational strengthening project together with the community that allowed, among several achievements, the establishment of the Original Settlers Association called “San Jacinto de Santay”, the construction of a Community Center and a school. The Island was not only recognized locally, regionally and nationally, but for its ecological characteristics and for the dedication of the population to the conservation, it was recognized internationally as a Ramsar place, award that highlights the importance of these ecosystems as fundamental for global conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity (Source: http://www.guayaquilesmidestino.com...quil/Santay-Island-National-Recreational-Area).

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    One of the main attractions is the new crocodile station, that has 12 crocodiles of approximately 6 meters in length and 200 pounds of weight, which were brought from the Esmeraldas province. The area that is located next to the Eco-village, is a large natural lagoon that provides safety to the visitor, since it has a peripheral closing with wood slats and triple galvanized mesh. The habitat is divided in two sectors, one for the females and the other for the only male of the station. The Island is also home to 85 bird species, 12 reptiles like the boa and the iguana; mammals like the raccoon, the anteater bear and the bat. Catfish, sea bass, tilapias, which are used for consumption and sale, form the aquatic fauna.

    [​IMG]We left the island by boat and sailed back to Guayaquil, while the locals islanders were preparing their boat. The Santay Island and the local work is a big contrast to the life in Guayaquil.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] Back in Guayaquil we headed back to the motorcycles – and stopped at an nitrogen ice cream store. It is the best passionsfruit (Spanish: “maracuya”) ice cream I have never had [​IMG].

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    Fresh made nitrogen passion fruit ice cream

    [​IMG]Now it is time to hit the road. We have 5000 km a head of us. Follow the next post to see if we are gonna make to trip all the way to Santiago de Chile in just 10-12 days.
    scudo, NSFW and Photowriter like this.
  13. Moose_DK

    Moose_DK Been here awhile

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    5000 km in 10 days! (Through the northern Peru)
    December 23, 2017
    On the first day we had planned to reach the border from Ecuador to Peru.

    Getting to Peru was a shock – trash everywhere

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    We found a cheap hotel in the nearby town Zapotillo, Ecuador. After arriving we went for a short walk in the small town, then back to the hotel to get a bite to eat (tuna) and go to bed.

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    The next morning it was back on the motorcycles. We got up early, but never before we have daylight. There was almost no other people at the border (choose the Le Alamor border), and it was easy to check out of Ecuador and enter Peru. We only had to wait at the custom office in Peru, because the only official employee was having breakfast. We imported the motorcycles into Peru, and was back on the road just after 1,5 hour. Our quickest border crossing so far!

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    From the border crossing we drove on a smaller road before getting back on the Pan-American highway, and in some places the road condition slowed us down a bit.

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    Our cruising speed is 55 mph or 80 kph when nothing is in our way. Like in the right picture where the two right lanes of the Pan-American highway was used for cattle.

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    Peru also have toll roads, but they are free for motorcycles, just stay to the right!

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    2400 km (1500 miles) through Peru is a long distance, and we tried to fill up the motorcycles after doing about 240 km (150 miles), which is about 3 hours on the motorcycles and often we also had to take a break in between. Some places we had to wait in line to fill up gas.

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    Back in the seat we were stunned and shocked over all the trash and garbage laying everywhere in Peru. Imagine that you get up in the morning and go for a ride on your motorcycle, and the only smell, is the smell of garbage or burning garbage.

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    Everybody just of load their garbage at the roadside

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    The piles of garbage kept growing, and some places people had built houses in the middle of all of it – I am not sure it is a healthy place to live

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    Even though we meet one garbage truck – it seem like an impossible and job, that would never end. We couldn’t even see where the garbage truck had been no not.

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    In general Peru is the most dirty country, that we have been through. Whipping of the visor and check out the lens on our camera.

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    We stopped before Lima and made some research about when it was rush-hour in Lima. We decided that it was best to hit Lim around 10:00 am to avoid the rush-hour traffic. Still about 10 million people live in Lima, and where there is a lot of people there is a lot of traffic. A lot of places it was really hard to lane split on the motorcycles, because there was just not enough room.

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    Stuck in the traffic without any possibility to lane split, this nice guy came by to sell us fruit. On a motorcycle it is just really difficult to find some money and where should I put it? He gave me a small bag for free, and I manage to put it in the bag, that was mounted on the gas tank.

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    After 2 hours we could leave Lima behind us [​IMG], and we were really satisfied how well it all went. Met these four other adventure riders, whom started in Columbia and where traveling the Pan-American highway all the way to Ushuaia, Chile. They only had two months to make it all the way, finishing on the 2nd of December. On this last part of our adventure on the motorcycles we have met more adventure riders in 10 days, than on the rest of the trip. It is always amazing to met other travelers on motorcycles or not. Safe travel guys, we hope you made it all the way.

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    We were now more than half way through Peru, it was amazing! We found another cheap hotel with safe parking for the motorcycles. I hope you like the bed [​IMG]

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    scudo, NSFW, roadcapDen and 5 others like this.
  14. Moose_DK

    Moose_DK Been here awhile

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    Hey Mike
    Yeah... the change from motorcycles will hopefully give us more time and energy for hiking and camping and the pictures of our life on the road. I can tell you that it already has... and we love hiking here in Chile. We hope to report more about hiking and camping life, including cooking food over a fire. Keep following our RR :-)

    Merry Christmas Camilla and Esben
  15. Moose_DK

    Moose_DK Been here awhile

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    5000 km in 10 days! (Through the southern Peru)
    December 26, 2017
    Now to the southern part of Peru, where there is more desert

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    We also came closer to the coast.

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    In the left picture a truck had had a hard time staying on the road, and in the right the Peruvians show how to load a truck!

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    Several places the sand was also covering the road, and the wind was blowing hard

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    Other places the sea mist made it almost impossible to see anything

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    The landscape was changing, and the amount of garbage were less and less

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    Now meeting small house and giant chicken farm (right picture)

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    We stopped for the night in a surfer town called Pacasmayo – but it as low season so nobody was there, and we went for a walk on the beach. It is tough for the body to sit so many hours in the same position on the motorcycle for so many day. We could feel it in our joints, and I could especially feel it in my knees.

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    We had bought food for the trip, so we could spend all our time driving. So each day we had tuna and more tuna. Tuna for lunch and mostly tuna for dinner. One day we stopped at a small fruit stall next to the road and bought mangoes. For few days we ate out for dinner, but we had tuna every single day on our way to Santiago de Chile. We have not eaten tuna since we came to Santiago de Chile, just having a “tuna-break”.

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    Spending as much time on the motorcycles every day a possible we made it to the Nazca lines in Peru, our only tourist stop on our way

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    We really want to see more of the Nazca lines from above, but it have to wait. So this time we had to enjoy the lines from the tower while the sun was setting. The Nazca Lines are a series of large ancient geoglyphs in the Nazca Desert. The largest figures are up to 370 m (1,200 ft) long. They were designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1994. The high, arid plateau stretches more than 80 km (50 miles) between the towns of Nazca and Palpa on the Pampas de Jumana (Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nazca_Lines). So there is a lot more to see.

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    We got closer and closer to Chile passing by rice fields on our way, and the weather was clearing

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    After 1 day in Ecuador and 4 day of riding in Peru we came to the border crossing into Chile on day 6. Yes we had to strip down the motorcycles. Taking all the bags off and the carrying all the bags into a security area, where all the bags went through a scanner. The employees had to open up three of our bags, checked that my massage ball was not an apple and confiscated a small bag of kettle corn for popcorns, which we ere not allowed to bring into Chile.

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    We were really lucky at the Chilean border crossing. We have heard that people spend 4-6 hours, but after two hours we could drive into Chile. We decided to stay in Arica, the first city after the border crossing. Went to Walmart, or here in Chile Walmart is called Lider. Bought cheese and ham for a sandwich, making it the first lunch not eating tuna [​IMG].

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    After putting up the tent we went for a nice walk on the beach chasing the birds.

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    See you in the next post, that will take us through northern Chile to Santiago de Chile
    scudo, NSFW, Todd157k and 4 others like this.
  16. Moose_DK

    Moose_DK Been here awhile

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    5000 km in 10 days! (Through northern Chile)
    December 29, 2017
    In Chile one thing quickly changed. It was just to expensive to stay in hotels, so we would have to camp in our tent again. Here in Chile we would find a lot of places (used www.ioverlander.com), were we could wild camp. The different landscapes were amazing and we enjoyed sleeping in our tent without the noise of traffic and not having to sleep in a terrible bed in a cheap hotel. The only thing is that it take more time to camp, and we still had 2000 km to go.

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    Now hoping that we could finish the last 2000 km in 4 days, which meant that the whole trip to Santiago de Chile would just have taking 10 days in total. Quickly back on the motorcycles to ride through the amazing desert in the northern part of Chile.

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    Here there is just a lot of nothing – the view from my motorcycle 90 % of the time

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    To pass time we tried to get through all the music numbers on the GPS, and when Esben is bored, he starts taking even more pictures [​IMG]

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    In average he took more than 250 pictures a day. After going through them all and deleting 90 % of all the riding pictures, we collected a few of the good ones. Driving through the desert and passing by the San Pedro de Atacama, which has Chile’s largest salt flat, volcanoes and steaming geysers. We just have to come back to this desolated, but breathtaking place.

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    Even a few pictures of Esben riding [​IMG]

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    It got harder to get up in the morning, and we really needed our morning coffee to get us going

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    Now also having the need for more caffeine during the day. In Peru it was impossible just to buy coffee on the gas stations (not totlly impossible but the ones we could buy tasted horrible), but here in Chile we could pretty much get everything, that would keep us going a few more hours on the motorcycles.

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    We had to drive 500 km a day to make the last 2000 km in 4 days, which meant that we didn’t have time for restaurants, so we had more tuna for lunch and dinner.

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    Setting up the tent after turning of the Pan-American highway on to a gravel road, where we easily found a spot where we could put up the tent

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    The further south we drove, the more green it got

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    Maybe you already noticed – all the garbage is gone. Getting in to Chile changed the garbage situation completely, it is thought-provoking that to neighboring countries are so far away from each other in handling the garbage. Here is an good example of how the people in Chile are getting aware of how long time is takes for different kind of garbage to degraded in the nature.

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    I think it was on our second to last day of driving, we stopped at a stall selling fresh cheese next to the road. We were just so tired of tuna.

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    We had booked a room in an apartment in Vina del Mar just north of Santiago. On the 10th day of driving we reached Vine del Mar. Yes, we made the 5000 km in just 10 days including two border crossing, which had been the two easiest border crossings so far. Our first stop was at the supermarket to buy fresh fruit, vegetables, meat and wine – NO MORE TUNA!

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    We stopped at McDonalds (only selling ice cream) before entering the supermarket – celebrating that we had made it!

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    We totally went crazy in the supermarket, and getting all the groceries on the motorcycles were a challenge. It was the last time, that we had packed up our motorcycles.

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    We met our Airbnb host, Jorge (a really nice guy – but more about that in another post), and he showed us the parking and apartment.

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    p align=”center”>Making dinner and sharing a bottle of vine

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    Come on Esben give me a smile! You don’t have to eat tuna [​IMG]

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    The apartment had a balcony were we had time to sit with a glass of wine and popcorn. We almost haven’t had any alcohol the last 6 months, so after sharing just one bottle of wine after 10 days on the road, we both woke up during the night with hangovers. I think we need to drink more wine, and do less kilometers [​IMG]. Still we were just so happy, that we were finally in Vina del Mar – ready to sell the motorcycles?

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    We would stay in the apartment while selling the motorcycles and buying a van – how did it go? Check out the next post
  17. adventurebound9517

    adventurebound9517 Been here awhile

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    You two are real troopers, good luck on the next part of your adventure.
  18. Moose_DK

    Moose_DK Been here awhile

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    Getting the motorcycles ready sale (Viña del mar)
    January 1, 2018
    Getting the motorcycles ready for sale was a lot of work – mostly because nothing had been cleaned since we left California. Used several hours at a Copec gas station, to get all the grease and oil of the motorcycles. Buying the right tools for cleaning the motorcycles makes the job easier. We used wheel cleaner and a bottle of lamp oil. The lamp oil is cheap, but great for dissolving old oil on the motorcycle and for cleaning the chain. Sponges for cleaning the rims and a toothbrush and a dishwashing brush for the engine and the greasy areas around the chain.

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    The motorcycles looked brand new again – or at least they looked very clean

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    I got this tire on my motorcycle in Costa Rica and it is a great tire. After doing 8000 miles on it, it still have a least 2000 miles left! The tire has been doing very well on both pavement, gravel and muddy roads. We would buy it again. Remember that my motorcycle is not super heavy, so if you put it on a bigger motorcycle fully loaded with luggage the life span of the tire is probably less.

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    We were lucky that there was a bathtub in the bathroom in the apartment, which was perfect for washing the duffle bags, soft saddlebags and our boots. Used wheel cleaner, that worked very well.

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    Then we just had to hang it outside on the balcony waiting for it to dry. In the mean time Esben washed the padding for the helmets and his moose.

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    Our boots jumped into the bathtub – taking a shower

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    While cleaning all our gear we met up with a woman from Switzerland, Tess and her boyfriend, who was selling their Toyota Hiace from 1999. They had travelled the southern part of Chile during the WINTER.

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    This is how it looked inside. In the left picture you have the seating area, where a table can be set up the the middle. In the right picture the seating area has been converted into a bed.

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    We transferred the money (8000 USD), and during the next couple of days Tess helped with all the paperwork, so the title for the van would be in my name. Fingerprints, signature… I don’t know why, I had to put my fingerprint next to my signature – it is not like my fingerprints are anywhere else in the system of Chile [​IMG].

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    The lady at the notary – did it the old fashion way, on a typewriter!

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    We are now the happy owners of Lance (Thanks for all your great suggestions of names on Facebook for our new home), who is a retired ambulance, that have been servicing the people of Santiago for several years.

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    p align=”center”>My name is Lance… Ambu Lance!

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    Lance had already travelled with a couple of surfers, before he took Tess and he boyfriend to the southern part of Chile in the winter. So with all that experience we are sure that he will take good care of us and serve us well. Taking us on new adventures – BUT before that we had to move into Lance with our things. First taking everything out and sorting all the things that Lance had collected during his first years of travelling. Then we could move the things we wanted to keep, and all our own things inside Lance. It was not a problem finding space for our things in Lance, since he is a lot bigger than our two motorcycles.

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    We changed the oil and cleaned the oil filter on the motorcycles, which was the last things we had to do before selling the motorcycles.

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    We loaded up my motorcycle in Lance, and Esben drove his to the motorcycle hostel Villa Kunterbunt in Valparaiso, who would store the motorcycles until the new owners, ADV Factory would arrive in Santiago.

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    After 21,000 km on the motorcycles we were ready to say good buy. So far it has been an amazing adventure, but we have also have some really hard times, where we didn’t had the energy for continuing. We still want to travel, and have found out that living on a motorcycle for more than six months is just not good for Esben’s health or our relationship in the long run. We are optimistic, that our new life with Lance can give us at different way to continue our adventure, that is more suitable for us and the way we like to experience the countries we travel in.

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    What should we with all our riding gear? All my riding gear was from 2009/2010, after doing about 100,000 km it is still in good condition, but not waterproof anymore. The status for Esben’s riding gear was pretty much the same. We decided to keep our boots and helmets, which were brand new, when we started this trip, and everything else we would give away for free. During our time in Viña del Mar our host, Jorge (in the right picture) invited us into his home for a BBQ and we met his family.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    We had a great afternoon with a lot of great meat and Chilean wine. We got to taste a white vine called Late Harvest. Late harvest wines are made from grapes that are left on the vine even after they’ve reached their peak ripeness. When grapes are (quite literally) left hanging, they become sweeter over time as each individual grape dehydrates and the sugar content becomes more concentrated. Late harvest grapes (typically picked 1-2 months after the regular harvest time) are used to make a wine that contains both higher residual sugar and higher potential alcohol than standard table wines. Technically, any wine grape can be harvested late (Chardonnay, Syrah, Pinot Gris, etc.), but you’ll tend to see certain grapes chosen over others due to their ability to process exceptionally high-quality late harvest wines (Source: http://winefolly.com/tutorial/late-harvest-wines-and-why-theyre-awesome/). We loved taking a cold glass of Late Harvest during the summer time here in Chile.

    We also met Jorge’s niece, Samantha, who was just started to ride her motorcycle only with a helmet and a pair of gloves. She is my size, so I gave her my motorcycle gear and in return we got a Chilean flag. Thank you [​IMG].

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    If you are about Esbens size, height 182 cm and normal weight. We left his motorcycles gear at the motorcycles Hostel Villa Kunterbunt in Valparaiso.
  19. Moose_DK

    Moose_DK Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2007
    Oddometer:
    761
    Location:
    Denmark
    Hi fellow Adventure Riders.
    This is it for the motorcycle part of our trip. We hope you have enjoyed it. I know we have and when we look back it has been a great experience.
    As you can read we are continuing our trip in a van over the next 6 months or so.
    Since we are no longer on motorcycle we will not be posting in this thread any more. But if anyone have any question please to not hesitate to ask.

    We will continue to update our own website and if anyone want to keep tagging along on our trip.
    The link is www.lessismore.one or on facebook www.facebook.com/lessismore.one

    Goodbye everyone and thank you so much for being with us all the way.

    PS: We are thinking about a shorter Asia trip on motorcycles some time later this year or early next year. But more about that later :-)

    [​IMG]
  20. adventurebound9517

    adventurebound9517 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2011
    Oddometer:
    934
    Location:
    Lake Havasu City, AZ.
    Thank you Camilla and Esben for taking us along. I have ear marked your blog and will continue to follow. Best of luck on your future travels.