Lever setup

Discussion in 'Trials' started by heffergm, Aug 2, 2018.

  1. heffergm

    heffergm Long timer

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    Turns out, Pat and I have basically the same setup! That's why we ride so much alike obviously... :rofl

    #1
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  2. lineaway

    lineaway Long timer

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    All the top riders run the clutch lM/C tight to the grip giving a hard pull, but an instant response. For us mortals just the opposite set up works for a longer throw and lighter clutch.
    #2
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  3. heffergm

    heffergm Long timer

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    My clutch side. As for angle, looks like (depending on where you measure) I'm at ~25-27 degrees down angle.

    Attached Files:

    #3
  4. motobene

    motobene Motoing for 46 years

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    IMG_20180802_091943.jpg In detail R Us. The Motobene setup:

    15 degree down angle on levers (inclinometer on grip and on top of the lever), 11 degrees actual.

    Clutch perch 3.10" from the left grip flange.

    Front brake 1.40" from the throttle housing.

    I'm with Lineaway.
    #4
  5. 2whlrcr

    2whlrcr gooligan

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    My bike has two levers on it...that's all I know.
    #5
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  6. wheelieman14

    wheelieman14 Adventurer

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    58
    Until you ride motobene's bike, or have him adjust your bar angle and lever setup; you will not understand how much easier it is to control your bike with very little effort. 5 weeks after Chris helped me setup my Evo (200 & 300) I managed to have a "perfect day" with zero points dropped and 32 Cleans in sloppy conditions at NETA Championship Event#6 of 13 in Berwick, ME. Thanks Chris!
    #6
  7. motobene

    motobene Motoing for 46 years

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    This issue is very programming based. The reasons behind preferences can be solid, or just 'used to.' People can get used to suboptimal and swear by that.

    It's complicated. Our bodies, minds and usage scenarios aren't all the same.

    Pat's bikes are to me stiff, abrupt, and a little ergonomically suboptimal in lever position. He is obviously well integrated to that and his trials world/level is different than mine... and most of us.

    You have to do what fits you. The difficult part is seeing outside the bubble and 'objectifying' the direction of more optimal and being able to justify that to yourself and others. While there is no final destination, there is direction.

    One of the short circuits in sports is conflating riding skill with everything else. Lend Vintagepro an ear and he will tell you many stories of working with (or trying to work with) top riders on suspension :-)

    One great aspect of neuroplasticity is that we can adapt or program our way around many impediments. It's why 'close enough' ends up good enough almost always.
    #7
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  8. 2whlrcr

    2whlrcr gooligan

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    I looked at mine, didn't measure anything, but my levers are slightly further inboard and I would guess about a 15 degree angle. My clutch engagement is close to the grip, as soon as I start to release my clutch finger, the clutch starts engaging. This is how I like it, so I'm not changing anything.
    #8
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  9. fprintf

    fprintf Been here awhile

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    When I rode Wheelieman14's Beta 300 this Spring, this close to the bar clutch engagement was one of the things I found hardest to get used to. I felt like I was smashing my fingers trying to keep the clutch from engaging! I just figured that is the way trials bikes are setup and I was going to struggle with that until I got used to it or that it meant I should be riding without the clutch to give the tops of my pinkie, ring and middle fingers a rest (using index finger on the clutch). I'm sure nerves played a role too, so I was squeezing way too hard to make sure the bike wasn't going to leap forward on me. :-)
    #9
  10. motobene

    motobene Motoing for 46 years

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    You should ride it now. Much better, as wheelieman14 said :-)

    This ergonomic thing is subtle but very important. If you are in a bubble about it, it's hard to see another way without directly experiencing it.
    #10
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