Log tying ?

Discussion in 'Trials' started by Dirt Dud, Jul 17, 2018.

  1. Dirt Dud

    Dirt Dud Been here awhile

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    I am building my first real sections and am wondering what you old time pros do to keep logs in place ? The ground is rocky and steep in places so what do you recommend ?
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  2. lineaway

    lineaway Long timer

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    Tree's or large rocks for at least one end. Otherwise you are gonna be digging to lodge somfthing to hold it. Rsilroad tie, fence stake, etc. A log on a steep hill needs to be very solidly put.
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  3. Manrider218

    Manrider218 Been here awhile

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    +1
    [​IMG]
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  4. Greebe

    Greebe Been here awhile

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    Leave them loose. That is always how they are in sections when you are at a competition. Then you can get used to how they are when they roll under your tires. Good training really.

    If you want multiple logs tied together to make a bigger obstacle, then you could use wire rope wrapped around them and tensioned with turnbuckles. You could also just use some cheap ratchet straps but they will eventually break down in the sun.
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  5. Dirt Dud

    Dirt Dud Been here awhile

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    Thanks Greebe I screwed together three logs and fell over them already ! I am building sections I am having a real hard time riding . I will leave the next batch loose and make some easier sections , since today in an hour and a half I fell 8 /10 times ! Great day to challenge yourself and that is what trials is all about .
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  6. heffergm

    heffergm Long timer

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    Man made sections are for indoors. If you're doing anything other than brush clearing I think you're probably going down the wrong road (unless you have zero natural train to work with, in which case do whatever you need to do).
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  7. jonnyc21

    jonnyc21 Trials Ninja

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    Even if you have natural train making some for learning can be much more confidence inspiring for safety reasons...

    Edit: However one would hope anyone doing this would work their way into the natural stuff quickly. :thumb
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  8. Norman Foley

    Norman Foley Devotee of the Husqvarna

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    Better plan a trip to the Tryals Shop, for a log tune up lesson with Mike!
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  9. alpineboard

    alpineboard Been here awhile

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    Tied my telephone poles together with a set of pinch straps, got them tight enough, did not need ratchet straps, and the pinch straps were very inexpensive, tractor supply. Thinking of the sun rot of the nylon strap, how about wrapping/ covering the strap with card board and tape, cheap, simple, to keep the sun from damaging the strap.

    Having fun on the double, hit the first one with a front wheel bounce , leap off it very hard and high, this gets the front wheel high, and then when the rear wheel hits the second log, it saves you. This is a good to learn , to hit the first one hard enough, kind of a goal to get over and totally clear the second, distance is 36" center to center. It is teaching me how to launch the bike with a safety margin.
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  10. Greebe

    Greebe Been here awhile

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    Not sure if that is true or not, doesn't seem to have hurt the way Pat Smage rides and his training area at Smagical Acres is man made. Yes natural terrain is probably better, but man made practice grounds seem to work fine for lots of people.
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  11. Greebe

    Greebe Been here awhile

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    @alpineboard, when you say pinch strap are you talking about the cam buckle straps like these?

    [​IMG]
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  12. heffergm

    heffergm Long timer

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    I was being a bit facetious. I wasn't saying they aren't 'fine' or don't work, just that you're going to be doing a ton of labor to move a lot of stuff around, when (again, assuming you have some terrain) you can probably skip all the effort. Unless you've got heavy equipment and/or unlimited time, I'd pass.
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  13. Greebe

    Greebe Been here awhile

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    Very true. Us flatlanders are at a disadvantage in finding good training aids. I have 40 acres, but it is all flat, and I mean flat. :doh For me the only way is to make my own obstacles or drive 2 hours to a place to train. Luckily for me I have a large tractor loader so that helps, but I have no way to practice hill climbs or steep off camber turns which so far has been a challenge at events with big hills. Maybe I need to rent a dozer and make a hill. Hehe! :lol3
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  14. motobene

    motobene Motoing for 46 years

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    When I lived in SW Michigan, we had a lot of man-made 'supplements' in some sections. Very popular we're old home heating oil tanks. People would give them away just to be rid of them. Just like a big rock. Slick when wet.
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  15. alpineboard

    alpineboard Been here awhile

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    Yes Greebe. Must have done this about 100 times so far, and seems to hold well. I did hit it once very hard, in a weird way and one of the straps loosened approx. 1/2 inch, just pulled it tight again, all set. Got a set of 12 of these green straps at Tractor supply, for $12 last year, they are just too easy to use , time wise, compared to the ratchet straps HPIM0455.JPG
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  16. Ditch

    Ditch Long timer

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    Maybe add a block to one end of your logs to create a "v" so as to have a varied double? Wish I had a yard.
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  17. alpineboard

    alpineboard Been here awhile

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    Good idea on the V, My goal is to get to the point of totally clearing the second log with a hard leap from the first, then will know it is OK safe to increase the distance of the logs, thinking width of block 8" more, Am already close to this goal.
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  18. Gordy

    Gordy Team Listo

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    Looks good but I don't think that is a 36" "double". I'm pretty sure that what you are doing is jumping both of them.
    Can you stop in a wheelbase or with the rear tire on the second one? That is more of a double.
    Both techniques are good, but move the logs further out, and splatter the second one (or front wheel tap it). That is more of a double and more handy in trials.
    Video would help if you want help. God knows there is plenty of free advice around this joint! :rofl
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  19. alpineboard

    alpineboard Been here awhile

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    36 center to center, Sorry for wrong terminology. Yes, am jumping both of them, front wheel in the air and over the second. So for a true Double, approx. 6 feet c-c log distance? Will try for a vid. , thx
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  20. Gordy

    Gordy Team Listo

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    No! 6' would be huge, don't kill yourself!
    I'm just saying I think you are motocrossing it. We can't tell for sure but try to control the rear wheel impact to stop you. Let me see if I can find a vid.
    BTW, I think it is awesome what you are doing! We can all learn these techniques on small(er) stuff before letting it rip on a big rock face. :thumb
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