Marathon Riding Training

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by ArtCuisin, Jul 10, 2018.

  1. ArtCuisin

    ArtCuisin Adventurer

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    (It being summer in the northern hemisphere, maybe everybody has

    been out riding, hence the seemingly low number of new threads in

    this sub-forum. Regardless, the time seems ripe to put out there an idea

    I've had for a long time.)



    Judging from riders I've met, I was wondering if MAYBE the rider

    that finds long distance motorcycle rides easiest is not somebody that

    exercises everyday, but someone who doesn't exercise at all, somebody

    that is skilled at inactivity, somebody that can sit for long periods of time

    with only occasional reason to get off the couch?



    In contrast, those people that are USED TO moving about, having lots

    of blood circulation and muscle movement are more likely to find the

    relative inactivity of long distance riding more uncomfortable. Runners,

    group sports regulars, gym rats--seem less likely to be doing long rides.



    The sample of riders I've met that can ride all day without complaint

    are guys that I'm reasonably sure have never exercised a day in their lives.

    Maybe I simply have not met enough people that regularly exercise?

    I'm not sure if the "sedentary" rider's body is just better used to relative

    inactivity or there are other physical characteristics that come into play.

    Maybe it is mental?



    Me, I'm not a good test case. I rarely do marathon rides anymore and only

    exercise when my alcohol consumption catches up with me!

    Maybe the periods when I did regularly exercise left me too fatigued to

    ride for long periods. Maybe I need to develop a theory about something

    else entirely.
    #1
  2. AzB

    AzB Fattest thin man

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    I can ride much farther when I'm fit. My posture is better, I'm more alert, there's less weight on my ass, and I can handle hot and cold weather extremes better.

    But that's just me.
    #2
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  3. shoeb

    shoeb Long timer

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    I'd have thought decent fitness would help with muscle aches and circulation (the main cause of sore butts).

    Plus, it reduces the odds of picking up injuries and illnesses that make riding hard, or impossible.
    #3
  4. AzB

    AzB Fattest thin man

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    I've found the best way to build up to long distances is riding longer distances than you normally ride. If you typically ride 200 miles, ride 400 miles. Then ride 550 miles. Build up to longer distances and you body will have time to adjust.

    Riding stupid long distance is then mostly a mental thing. Sure, you'll have to deal with your body rebelling a bit, but your mental state becomes the deciding factor at that point.
    #4
  5. GoGoGavin41

    GoGoGavin41 Wheelie Ergo Sum

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    I'd like to think I fall into the "Fit" category. Long distance riding is always easier for me when my core is strong.
    #5
  6. ArtCuisin

    ArtCuisin Adventurer

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    Crap. I suppose I need a new theory.....
    #6
  7. Rollin'

    Rollin' does it come in black?

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    I had been working out for several years but really picked up the pace in 2009 and early 2010. I was preparing for an almost 12,000 mile road trip.
    The goal was to complete the Iron Butt 49 states in 10 days ride, an average of 881 miles a day for 10 days. I was 56 at the time.
    I was using my treadmill, elliptical machine and weights and running up the hills at the local park everyday and also doing at least 60 sit-ups a day, everyday. I was in the best shape of my life.
    Was able to complete the trip at a good pace including traveling over 5000 miles in less than 5 days during the ride.
    I think working out helped to increase my overall endurance and the back strength helped a lot on the long days. The full 16 day trip was 11,907 miles.
    I don't work out now and I can really feel the difference on the longer rides.

    .
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  8. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad Former World's Foremost Authority

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    Hard to find a truck driver who is on the road constantly that isn't "unfit". Sitting on the road for extended periods doesn't take physical strength, it takes mental strength. If you are off piste, then the fun factor adds to the ability to go longer periods.
    #8
  9. C/1/509

    C/1/509 Why?

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    I too would think that being physically fit would make it easier to ride long distances. That said, I work out seven days a week and don't like rides that require sitting on the interstate for long periods.
    #9
  10. CajunRider

    CajunRider Been here awhile

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    As with anything that is distance related, it's 90% mental.

    A drag race takes 13 seconds of skill. The Indy 500 takes HOURS of skill.

    The best tri-athletes look like they are barely trying. The fastest race car drivers look slow. The reason for all that easy "look"??? They are relaxed and confident in their abilities.

    Once you have the skill, you just gotta learn how to relax. Once you can relax for hours at a time, you'll be running Iron Butts just as easy as light to light city drag races.

    Sent from my E6782 using Tapatalk
    #10
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  11. PlainClothesHippy

    PlainClothesHippy Caution: NO humans before coffee.

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    I'll put forth that hunting is good training as well. Sitting in the woods for three hours at a stretch without moving while keeping your senses alert to every movement and sound around you translates well to riding.

    As to fitness...it's always an advantage no matter what the activity.
    #11
  12. kwthom

    kwthom Retiree apprentice - willing to learn

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    How in the hell didja come up with this theory again?? :dunno

    You're right, there's not a great deal of 'movement', but it might be an interesting experiment to determine the caloric energy use needed for a 12+ hour motorcycle ride

    Would there be enough caloric burn (~3500) to lose that pound of weight? Doubtful.

    A third of a pound (~1160 calories) ? Probably a lot closer if a couple of those hours of riding were on roads that required a lot of movement.
    #12
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