My KTM 950 Story....lots of pics!

Discussion in 'Crazy-Awesome almost Dakar racers (950/990cc)' started by Pyndon, Jun 23, 2006.

  1. Pyndon

    Pyndon Long timer

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    It's a lottery! 16/45 with 18"/21" wheels is the best for off-road but too low geared for road riding long distances (fuel economy takes a hit!). Likewise, 17/42 is too far the other way with the big wheels but perfect with 17"/19" setup. Somewhere in between is good and allows switching of wheels between the two sizes. I tend to use 17/45 as it's easier on the chain than a 16 front but the short answer is.........

    Whatever is in my garage when the teeth snap off the front sprocket and the chain starts throwing rollers...........so this time it was 17/42. I alsways use the KTM DID OEM chains though, not had as much life from others.

    Pyn
  2. aurel

    aurel Cheese&Wine!

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    A perfect training before the HUMM Rallye in Andorra :freaky
  3. LukasM

    LukasM Long timer

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    Pyn and Aurel,

    Are you guys going to the HUMM in Spain?


    Lukas
  4. aurel

    aurel Cheese&Wine!

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    Yes I am, with two others guys from Orange Crush (mookymoo and riderbob).

    I don't think Pyndon is attending (to?) this rallye, to slow for him :D
  5. Pyndon

    Pyndon Long timer

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  6. Katoom119

    Katoom119 Mmmm....Orange Kool-aid

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    Probably too late now, but if you can check out Champery, Switzerland. I have never been to a more beautiful place in all my life.

    Oh yeah, and when you get to 100,000 you need to be on the back wheel in some distant land. Just a thought.
  7. Mountain_Mike

    Mountain_Mike BachEnthusiast

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    I am about to take my 2005 ADV950 out for a spin around the local twisties near the west end of Lake Geneva (with Mrs B onboard)... so where are you in Switzerland?

    Michael B.
  8. Pyndon

    Pyndon Long timer

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    You know those niggly little problems, the ones you cannot find, well I've had one for a while and it's been driving me crazy! An electrical problem that is seriously intermittent. When you have an hour in the garage to fix it, it fails to rear its ugly head but when your on the motorway in driving rain it decides to pop out of nowhere and surprise you when you need it least. Well, here's the story of mine!

    Around about 10,000 miles ago, just before I took off for Africa, I was riding home from work and the bike sputtered, you know, cut and and then started again and was fine. A few days later it did the same thing. It was indicative of an ignition switch problem and since I was leaving for my Africa ride and I had little time, I decided to fit a new one. Bike seemed fine so I went to Africa. It went for weeks with no troubles but then I had that niggly hick-up / cough from time to time. Nothing to wreck you ride but enough make me think about what it could be and it it was going to crap out on me!

    The bike eventually did crap out in Africa but it was because of a fatigued battery terminal, as detailed in this RR Salt & Gold 2009. Anyway, once I'd botched the battery terminal in the Sahara, the cough was still there from time to time.

    Upon my return from Africa I went through the entire bike and checked all the connections, fitted a new positive lead, greased all the electrical connectors and called it good.

    Weeks later, it starts again. This time on the way up to Scotland. The difference this time being that the bike actually cut-out doing 90 in the fast lane. I clutched it an looked down to see the dash doing weird things so I turned the ignition off and on again and she fired up.

    About a week later, the same happened again, this time in lovely weather but stuck in traffic and would not re-start. As I sat at the side of the road scratching my head, the fuel pump fired up (I'd left the ignition switch on) and I continued.

    This time I stripped the ignition switch and cleaned it all out, checking all the connections and wires for continuity. I headed to Holland for the Mid-Summer ride and did a further 2500 miles, again with a couple of coughs and back-fires when I least expected them. The problem was still there but it would never rear its head for long enough to fix it.

    It was now time to head on a big ride around Europe with AntWare and Neduro. It was always in the back of my mind that the problem might still be there, but it never stopped me riding! 3000 miles later, while booking it North from the Italian Alps the bike started to play up again. This time more serious. It would stay dead!

    Great....at least I had a chance of finding the problem. We wiggled and poked but found nothing. Again it just started to work so we headed off. 100miles down the road, same again, instrument panel going crazy and eventually the motor died. This time for good!

    It was clear by now that the problem was not condition related, on-road / off-road, wet / dry, fast / slow, rough / smooth it made no difference.

    After stripping the bike at the side of the road and going through everything from top the bottom, connectors and plugs, wiggling the loom, changing parts out from bike to bike......nothing! I was towed at 80mph 4ft from the rear of AntWare down the Peage in the persisting rain!

    After finding a hotel, spending the night drinking in a bar with a French student called Alex (photo's to follow no doubt), we staggered to a 24hr internet cafe and interrogated the KTM wiring diagram.

    The next morning....WTF....the bikes working again! By this time we were on our way back and the bike never missed a beat for the 1000 mile trip home.

    Since getting home just a few days ago, the bike has undergone major strip and the problem has been identified :clap

    A corroded positive supply tab to the 30AMP supply fuse on top of the starter relay. A $40 part had caused all these problems but it never left me stranded for too long :D Merely a minor inconvenience in reflection.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I think water and crap gathers under the tab as it sits next to the plastic housing and just eats away at it until it breaks or causes problems.

    The tab is an integral part of the assembly and could be fixed on the side of the road pretty easily if you carry a fuse holder with a spade connector on one side (to push into the forward side of the fuse holder) and a 6mm tab connector on the other (to attach under the positive lead bolt). This may be my solution as it would save buying a new starter relay and eliminate the problem in the future.

    Advice: For those of you that run your bikes year round in harsh conditions, make sure this area is well cleaned and greased well to prevent contamination / corrosion. Also, carry a fuse holder setup as mentioned above as a road side repair solution.

    :ricky
  9. Steverino

    Steverino Arrogant Horse's Ass #1

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    Sorry, but you bought the bike as is, I am not going to help you with the cost to fix this...:augie

    :wave

    Mine still leaks oil and I am actually going to have to get the case fixed for real soon. Still a hoot to ride.
  10. Vicks

    Vicks gets stuck in sand

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    sounds kinda similar to the problem i experienced with my evil electricals

    do you think they are identical ? I have cleaned out my ignition switch a few days ago, and did not experience a recurrance until yesterday when the FI light lit up a few times and the speedo jumped to 240kmph (while i was coming to a stop at the traffic lights !! ).

    cheers
  11. Pyndon

    Pyndon Long timer

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    But you said it was maintained regardless.......yer didn't f'in grease that tab up did you!?!?!?

    :lol3

    PM'd you re cases :deal
  12. Pyndon

    Pyndon Long timer

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    Same symptoms and yes its the same part number on the 950 and 990 - 60011058000

    Do the quick fix suggested and see if the problem persists.

    Pyn
  13. Vicks

    Vicks gets stuck in sand

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    Thanks for the quick reply Pyn.

    Will try the fix u've suggested. Just one dumb question - I might not be able to find di-electric grease here, Can i use bearing/axle/universal joint grease to grease these electrical connections at the starter relay and the battery after cleaning the contact surfaces ?

    My plan is to clean the surfaces, tighten the connections and then, generously coat them with grease.
  14. Cpt. Ron

    Cpt. Ron Advrider #128

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    Dielectric grease won't conduct electricity. Standard bearing grease may, depending on the additives. I wouldn't use it. In a pinch, use Vaseline (petroleum jelly).
  15. Vicks

    Vicks gets stuck in sand

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    Thanks for that.

    I did some reading and saw some inmates recommend a silicone based grease as an alternative to di-electric grease. I had some silicone grease (spray) and used it liberally.
  16. Pyndon

    Pyndon Long timer

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    After reading KTM Tech Bulletin 0305/32/03-E a couple of years ago, I've been riding on tender hooks for the past 40,000 miles.

    I quote the Tech Bulletin.......

    Anyway, watching Neduro clutching second gear wheelies past a bunch of DRZ's in the Pyrenees was enough to make me feel the need to spend the sponds ($$$$$) on a new Outer Clutch Hub so that I too could do the same without the worry of the clutch exploding through the side of my engine!

    I hear you worry....but fear not. My bike is one of the first few made with the old 'steel band' style clutch basket which was soon replaced by a much stiffer and stronger alloy basket after subsequent testing by KTM. It's easily identifiable too, new is on the right.......

    [​IMG]

    I did measure the band on the clutch all those years ago and it was a 1.0mm band so I decided to leave it and just keep checking it periodically. The band has never come loose on mine (even now) although I recently heard of a 32,000 mile bike having rivet failure and a loose band and this, along with the lack of clutch induced wheelies was enough to make the call.

    I inspected the band and saw that it had shifted considerably and was pushing / wearing the aluminium. This is probably what causes the pressed pimples (rivets) to fail and the band to come loose. It was the right time to change it. The implications of a steel band or parts of a steel band barrelling around your engine does not bear thinking about.

    [​IMG]

    The old basket has done me proud at 61,000 miles. I have now laid it to rest in my garage. I'm thinking it'll make a nice clock or something :dunno

    As always, just wanted to keep you posted.

    Pyn
  17. DeeGee

    DeeGee I'm a Yorkshireman thanoz

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    Top man! :thumb I've got a bit of catching up to do, probably get past the 40k mark in the next two weeks, eastern Europe beckons :D

    I just hope the water pump seals hold out ;)
  18. Pyndon

    Pyndon Long timer

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    If in doubt....change it! At least carry a spare shaft, seal and tools if you don't.

    Pyn
  19. mookymoo

    mookymoo Mookish Mook

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    Yup, change the bugger before you go. Its easy to change it on the road - but if, say, your inner clutch cover gasket disintegrates under its own weight like mine did, it can make your roadside repair a little exciting. You need a socket for the header bolts & the clamp at the rear too (they are the same size - 13mm IIRC - and its not in your toolkit).
  20. Pyndon

    Pyndon Long timer

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    Reversible circlip pliers would help too :thumb

    Hi-jack over........more than enough water pump threads on here :D
    nk14zp likes this.