New rider gear?

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by Cashcole, Jul 7, 2018.

  1. Cashcole

    Cashcole Adventurer

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    Thanks, I'm at Scout camp this week with sons. I'll be getting on all of this after I return.
    #21
  2. oldtouring B

    oldtouring B Been here awhile

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    It would be a good idea to post your sizes.
    #22
  3. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    And the sort of climate you mostly ride in. I'm in the UK and we get rain, high humidity in summer, and not the sort of cold common in some places in the US. Touring in southern Europe can be as hot as anything in the US.

    You could end up with a wardrobe nuanced for every minute change in climate or road type. Forget "best", that is advertising hype - try for optimum for you and your use. No one knows what you want to do as well as you. Only you know what fits you right.
    This particularly applies to helmets - if it don't fit right it could be bad news for your neck or head.

    While I have always worn a helmet and gloves, I am not an AGATT zealot. Spare some of your budget for taking a defensive riding course, or at least having a read of some of literature on the subject. You know the mantra, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

    In over 50 years I have fallen off twice, once on Diesel, once on stupid. The courses available here would have helped in both situations. I read the "Roadcraft" manual, for police class 1 pursuit riders/drivers. Despite my bike being black, I can't remember the last time someone pulled out on me. Decades, rather than years.
    And no, you won't get confused as to which side of the road to ride, or how to go round roundabouts.
    Key notes: Observation and Awareness.

    Good luck - ride safe.
    #23
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  4. Cashcole

    Cashcole Adventurer

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    Thank you for your words of advice, I do appreciate!
    #24
  5. Cashcole

    Cashcole Adventurer

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    Sorry, I have no idea what my sizes are or how motorcycle gear fits.
    #25
  6. JTerryM

    JTerryM -/\~

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    Sizes, as in jeans and sport coat or jacket, and hat size for helmets.
    #26
  7. oldtouring B

    oldtouring B Been here awhile

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    I spent my entire working career in men’s clothing. All I need is your weight and height. Your shirt size . Pant size . The boots are easy. You must know what size shoe you wear.

    The sizing in gear is very consistent with other sizing. Except for standard fit versus European. Very simple.
    #27
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  8. rider1150gsadv

    rider1150gsadv Long timer

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    First off all buy stuff that FITS comfortably!
    If I had to prioritize in order of importance, i'd pick the helmet is the most important safety piece. You can go Full Face or modular (flip up chin bar). Jacket is # 2 as to protect your spine and upper body. #3 boots and gloves #4 pants. Visit a few places and dealers that have a large inventory and sell quality gear. Walmart is not one of them...:lol2
    #28
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  9. aldend123

    aldend123 Long timer

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    Fit is arguably more important than any fancy marketing features. Most motorcycle-specific products are going to provide some level of protection. The more expensive clothing is available in suit coat sizes. European stuff is sold in Euro sizes (e.g. a size 54), while American stuff is the same minus 10. So EU54/US44. Occasionally you'll see 44L, 44R, or 44S for Long, Regular, Short. Boots are the same - Euroboot size 47, or American size 12 the same as any regular shoe. When trying something on, don't forget to mimic how you'll be sitting on the bike instead of just assessing it while standing up.

    A pair of purely leather gloves is going to be harder to fit right compared to something made of textiles, or half of the glove is stretch panels since all of our fingers are slightly different lengths.

    Get a couple feet of string or a seamstress tape measure and take measurements as if you're being fit for a custom tailored suit. Plenty of youtube instructionals available. Write it all down. This will help determine if the garment is the right size. All the manufactures have size charts.

    Flip-up helmets seem more enticing when you're new to helmets but you can get pretty used to wearing a standard full face. Helmet fit will be the hardest part. There's more to it than just the size on the label if you want an ideal fit. Have to try them on in person. A CycleGear chain store will have a bunch if you want to just browse no pressure. Take note of what fits. The brand, the size, and the model. Sometimes the fit varies model to model within the same brand. Getting your head through the entrance should be a tad snug at first. The padding will pack down a bit through usage. It's more important that it feels right once on than it is ease of putting it on when new. A common debate around here is whether an inexpensive helmet is substandard protection. There's a lot of people that feel a more expensive helmet is more about a premium product than measurable safety improvments.

    I'd be reluctant to spend a lot of money on clothing until you know what's important to you. Your priorities are likely to change as you progress and gain experience. Also, while I fully support wearing protective equipment don't lose perspective that internal injuries from collision with immovable objects are difficult to protect against. Point being you can dress head to toe in kevlar but that's for roadrash. Most of us (myself included) aren't riding the street with much more than roadrash coverage.
    #29
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  10. Cashcole

    Cashcole Adventurer

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    Thank you !
    #30
  11. Kommando

    Kommando Long timer

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    I wear affordable gear. Tourmaster Flex pants are good all year. I also wear BILT or Sliders kevlar cargos or jeans, with armor in the knees/hips.

    Bilt armored gloves are decent and affordable. I also like their DS Techno helmet with Bluetooth.

    Over my hi-viz shirts, I wear a Fox Raptor CE chest/back protector with an Alpinestars CE chest pad velcro'd into it. This fits under an armored mesh jacket that is 1 size larger than normal on me. I usually onlyouse the jacket for long trips or cold weather. Otherwise, I just add some elbow armor to the chest/back protector.

    Frog Toggs from Cycle Gear keep me dry.

    I wear ATV boots or steeltoe workboots.
    #31
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  12. Soulbreeze

    Soulbreeze Been here awhile

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    One thing I didn't learn early on: your riding pants need longer legs than your walk-around pants. Bought my first pair based on length while standing up. Every time I rode the bottoms would hike up to the top of my boots.
    Also, if you try on helmets with removable cheek pads, remove them and try the helmet on. It makes it easier to tell if the crown of the helmet fits your head shape without the cheekpads throwing you off (cheeks should be pretty snug when new which can make the crown padding feel different than it actually is) .
    #32
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  13. JR356

    JR356 Long timer

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    Motorcycle gear.com has nice gear in their closeout/sale sections.
    Currently see a Klim Apex Air jacket for $299,this is about half off for a top quality jacket with excellent armor.
    Another vote for the Shoei GT Air helmet,flows a ton of air,love the built in sunshade,well built.I am on my second GT Air,bought it essentially new in the flea market here for about 40 percent off.
    Firstgear and Olympia make good gear at reasonable prices.

    JR356
    #33
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  14. Cashcole

    Cashcole Adventurer

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    What's the average price on a helmet? How often do they need to be replaced?
    #34
  15. NJ Moto

    NJ Moto Long timer

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    Manufacturers suggest replacement after 5 years.
    #35
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