Panniers for dummies

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by GregoryS, Jan 12, 2018.

  1. GregoryS

    GregoryS Adventurer

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    Greetings all,


    Noob here looking for panniers for a recently purchased ’16 AT. I have mostly worked out the hard vs soft question, and have decided on hard panniers for the security they offer over soft panniers. Plunking down a significant amount of entertainment coupons is always a challenge when you know you don’t know all the questions to ask. There is an overwhelming amount of research that I am finding here that helps, but is all over the place. Each thread that I pick up, adds new questions that send me looking for more answers then I can find. I am hoping to create a somewhat comprehensive hard pannier thread for those like me.


    Trying to find the smaller manufactures, or manufactures in different parts of the world can be a daunting task. Unfortunately, going and seeing, picking up and playing with most systems is not an option. Ditto for bike specific for XX system pros and cons are hard to track down.

    So what I am after is a more general approach to figuring out which system will work best for me.


    Some of the questions I have


    1. Having to “walk” or “peddle” the bike, how much do the panniers limit foot/leg motion? Is there significant danger to feet/ankle damage? I like the Jenny system for this reason.

    2. I know each get off is different and there is no way to predict broken bones, but how big a concern are hard panniers for trip ending injuries? I know that a lot of this question depends on the riders skill level, and I plan on taking a course/lessons prior to venturing out into the real world

    3. Dirt naps. No doubt I will take a few. I don’t foresee too many rock gardens in my immediate future. We are planning Prudhoe Bay in ’19 and some of the DAKAL in June. How well does your system hold up? I know that the ridged nature of hard panniers transfer the impact to the bike’s frame/sub frame. Are failures/damage common due to slow to moderate speed drops/get offs?

    4. What are you using and would you buy it again?
    5. Any questions I am not asking?

    6. Who am I missing from this list?

    Touratech
    Givi
    SW Motech
    Jenny.
    Happy trails


    Thanks in advance for helping a noob,


    GregoryS
    #1
  2. pieterv10

    pieterv10 Adventurer

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    6. Bumot

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    #2
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  3. greg.279

    greg.279 Adventurer

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    As for other brands, check out Globescout ;

    https://advdepot.com/collections/globescout-pannier-kits

    I use these on my Tiger, and really like them. I haven't crashed or paddled with them, but they're very sturdy and mount solidly with no plastic in the mounting system, but are still easy enough to remove if you want to. They have locks and latches on both ends and I like that the top has tie down points if you want to add some extra baggage to the top.

    Sent from my Moto E (4) using Tapatalk
    #3
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  4. HarveyM

    HarveyM Been here awhile

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    No personal experience, but the Mule Pack Panniers look interesting.
    #4
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  5. scootac

    scootac Just a Traveler

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    In the same boat as OP.
    Here's two more,
    Tusk and Holan
    And Caribou which use Pelican cases.
    #5
  6. GregoryS

    GregoryS Adventurer

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    Looked the Caribou, didn't like the side opening system. Saw the Tusk, and as much as I like the price, think you get what you pay for.
    #6
  7. Yooper_Bob

    Yooper_Bob Long timer

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    Check out the Caribou soft bags.... I have them on my Africa Twin, and I love them. They are quick to put on and take off like hard panniers, but way better if you plan to do a significant amount of dirt riding.

    Plus, the price is very reasonable.
    #7
  8. JR356

    JR356 Long timer

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    They have a top opening version.

    JR356
    #8
  9. Tripped1

    Tripped1 Bitch called me a feminist.

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    For me anyway, Hard vs Soft is a question of employment.

    For dirt? Soft, all day every. The reasons are many and varied, less chance of damage to you, less chance of damage to the frame of the bike i.e. a minor off with mini-fridge sized aluminum hard cases can tweek the sub-frame on a lot of bikes, this is an instant insurance write off for what would otherwise be minor damage. Plus they are a little more versatile, you can stretch them to odd shapes, bungie things all over the place etc.

    On the road (I am 90% on road) hard cases are more convenient and more secure (no one is going to cut them open or just pull a zipper) often more stable at speed. If its a road trip I am not worried about catching my leg dabbing, or damaging the subframe, because the chances of that are a LOT lower.

    Ideally if I was planning for real dual-sport type ADV riding I would be looking for a racked hardcase that you can use with soft luggage and a hard topcase. Once you have a rack you can chose to go hard or soft (though there is added expense).

    I noticed you mentioned "we" if we is a passenger, considerations must also be made for getting on and off the bike. My passenger is relatively tall and a yoga freak, so she doesn't have a lot of issues swinging her leg over the top-case/35-odd-liter each pillion cases, however, on longer days where you are hopping on and off of the bike 50 times a day it wears on both of us, I can tell exactly how tired she is getting by how much she is yanking the bike around mounting. I also have friends that their wives won't ride rully loaded because they can't get on and when they do the cases are in the bottom of their thighs which puts their legs to sleep.

    Do you go hard the top loading vs side loading is a thing. I have side loaders and its fine, because I basically never open them on the bike. Any daily use things that we take in and out are in the tank bag and/or top case, the sides are camping gear and changes of clothes and whatnot, they only come out at camp.
    #9
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  10. Jed Clampett

    Jed Clampett Adventurer

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    I've had em all. I bought these Tusk this year. These are every bit as good as anything else I've owned. In other words, they get the job done, and well worth the money. Cheap price. You just have to be creative mounting them. My top box is Jesse Luggage, way more expensive, I've had it for years.

    Attached Files:

    #10
  11. K1W1

    K1W1 Long timer

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    1. Depends on the size and shape of the pannier, where it fits on the bike and the size and shape of the rider

    2. Any pannier with 90 degree (square) edges on the front vertical outer edge or front lower edge is a broken leg waiting to happen. Those are the edges you are most likely to get trapped under and with the square edge the entire 250kg or thereabout weight of the bike will be channeled into a tiny area of your leg bone.

    IMO only this is a really bad design
    [​IMG]

    whereas something like this is at least a little better
    [​IMG]

    I will also put my hand up and say that I am a person who hates metal panniers anyway and would never, ever use them on any bike that was used on dirt or off road.
    #11
  12. GregoryS

    GregoryS Adventurer

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    Missed that one.....
    #12
  13. 9Realms

    9Realms Drawn in by the complex plot

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    Holan Nomada (I think in the same maker-family as Bumot).

    I love them. No issues, hung them on SW Motech side case racks and a Motech tailbox bracket. I chose a tailbox that would allow me to drape a tire over in a pinch to transport. This (medium) box allowed me that accommodation. Sturdy enough to un-dock and use for camp furniture if you like, although my tailbox is kept bolted permanent.

    No leaks, no dust, robust. More affordable than some. Got some of it at a great price through a splendid vendor on this forum. My exhaust is under-body so I did not need a box with a cut out, which gave me both cases the same width with no offset in them or the bracketry.


    ho.jpg


    I had Pelican Storm cases (IM2600's) on another bike and loved them too.
    :clap
    #13
  14. GregoryS

    GregoryS Adventurer

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    Start at 41:41

    #14
  15. Brokebrute

    Brokebrute Been here awhile

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    I have Bumot panniers on my bike. They are well built and take drops well. The tool box option is nice and holds more than I thought it would. The mounting bracket on the exaust side is in the way of my foot when I sit on the back but my wife doesn't notice it. I have a Tiger 800 so I don't know if it is a problem with the Africa Twin, but it was something that surprised me and I thought I should add.
    #15
  16. c_m_shooter

    c_m_shooter Ninja Warrior

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    1. DO NOT PEDDLE THE BIKE. You will end up with a wrecked knee or foot. Stand on the pegs and ride it, if things go bad you want no part of yourself under that pig. The only exception I will make is going through a groove in the rocks that is deeper than my footpegs, I will push off the rocks to keep my feet out of the crush zone. Armor the bike and carry spare levers, if it has to fall let it fall.

    2. Panniers and a topcase will trap you on the bike when you need to get away from it most. You need to be an experienced rider before going off road with those.

    3. Get a dirt bike and ride all the rockgardens you can find. Practice full lock 1st gear circles in your driveway and get to where you can stop for a few seconds and restart without taking you feet off the pegs.

    4. I prefer to just stuff my gear in a drybag then a duffle and tie it to the rear rack/passenger seat with ROK straps. All that hard luggage empty weighs more than my camping gear. Try camping off a bicycle to encourage yourself to pear down your gear.

    Oh yeah, enjoy the ride. I don't mean to sound so negative, I've just seen a few people get injured.
    #16
  17. Grumpy old Man

    Grumpy old Man Been here awhile

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    If you are looking for reasonable priced alloy panniers look at http://www.heavyduties.ro

    Metal Mule is another one I would consider.

    For me I found with the Kriega OS32 Pannierbags the best solution out of both worlds.

    And with a steelcore Strap They can be secured to the pannier frame.


    [​IMG]


    Gesendet von iPad mit Tapatalk Pro
    #17
  18. brianpc

    brianpc Long timer

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    My limited pannier knowledge / recommendations:

    - If you're doing any dirt/offroad I would highly recommend soft bags, and Mosko Moto 35L backcountry bags are amazingly good. IMHO security could be an issue any time you're out somewhere but if you're parking the bike overnight, the bags are easily/instantly removed from the racks and can be brought into your tent or hotel room with little effort. I would be very interested to see somebody test out the security of the Moskos against a knife slash or stab - they are made of some heavy-ass material and I'm betting it would take a considerable (and very noticeable) effort to make a hole in them large enough to access your stuff and steal it.

    - After using touratech zegas on 2 different motos, I'm a bigger fan of the Givi Outback Trekkers / Dolomiti hard cases. The only downside I don't like about Givi is that they require a Givi-specific pannier rack that has little nubs on it for mounting, and you couldn't use a set of Mosko bags on them (AFAICT, anyway). I like things that can do double duty - the touratech rack (and other pannier rack brands) can accomodate Moskos. Not sure if this is something you'd consider, but it's always good to be aware of future-proofing your setup. :)

    - Whichever brand of hard pannier you buy, I would highly recommend a set of bag liners - Bestem and RKA make them for a lot of brands - if you can find a set that fit your brand of panniers. These are great especially for side-opening panniers if you open them on the bike, your stuff won't fall out. Also it makes unloading at the end of the day easier, you can grab 2 bags and retire to your tent / hotel room without having to stand by the bike with a flashlight and fish out what you need.
    #18
  19. EnduroRdr

    EnduroRdr Woods Racer & D/S Rider

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    Agreed, I’ve been riding for 50 years had a couple of different boxes. (GS with Jessie boxes, KLR with Happy Trails, my current klr has HP rack with small custom fab aluminum boxes. But I also have large Tusk boxes for long trips. I also have some no name soft bags. Jessie boxes are great but you pay big bucks for them, I like the Happy Trails stuff too but honestly if you compare apples to apples (same style vs same style - plain aluminum boxes vs plain aluminum boxes ::and:: fancier rounded corner vs fancy rounded corner style) You will find Tusk is a great product for a great price. You get what you pay for is usually true but in this case (pun intended), the tusk box is every bit the Apple that Happy Trails is.
    So why pay twice the price.
    Besides once you scratch it or dent on a rock they are still the same dented Apple.

    If you realize your gonna drop your AT at some point and put a few scratches or dents then why spend a grand or more on aluminum boxes and rack system - get the Tusk they are well made, good latches and racks. ALL FOR UNDER $500!!!

    Then you have $ left over to get a set of wolfman soft bags to hang on your Tusk racks for those days you want to go all softy -

    Honestly watch this torture test video (especially the torture in the second half) this is why folks like well made hard cases. Keeps your stuff safe and dry.




    https://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/p/1033/44605/Tusk-Aluminum-Panniers-with-Pannier-Racks?v=14434

    [​IMG]


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    #19
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  20. GregoryS

    GregoryS Adventurer

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    Holy 'chit! That was some abuse
    #20