Powerplus or Bust, Eh?

Discussion in 'Old's Cool' started by Twotaildog, Jul 26, 2014.

  1. Mike Goldthorpe

    Mike Goldthorpe Been here awhile

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    Gun makers were all there too. When wars finish, the demand for guns falls and the makers of high quality tubing need a new market...
  2. Twotaildog

    Twotaildog Old Poop

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    I'm not all that interested in going fast, but I would love to participate in the TROG.




    Kevin


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  3. Twotaildog

    Twotaildog Old Poop

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    Patience's innards look pretty clean for an old girl that's been rode hard and put up wet.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]






    Kevin


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  4. Twotaildog

    Twotaildog Old Poop

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    A quick status of what is going on with Patience. I've got three Machinists and a magneto guy working on parts. New rocker bushings are being made, a spare cylinder is having fins and valve seats repaired, and the D2 for the cam followers is on order. I have oversized tappets coming from Sweden. I just got a box of new crank pins and pinions. Two transmission cases have been rebushed and are ready to assemble. The spare mag is being rebuilt by the same guy who did last years mag. I put an order in for more pistons. Now I can focus on the holidays. Hoping all of this will come together in January, and I can build a motor.

    Wishing a blessed and merry Christmas to you and yours. Be well and happy.




    Kevin


    .
  5. Old Mule

    Old Mule Long timer

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    Yes they are. A KHK is the only Harley I've ever really looked at with envy. Took half a century for side valve development to get from Patience to Dick O'Brien. The hot rod Ford boys are doing a lot now with gas flow and chamber shapes, progress is happening!
  6. Twotaildog

    Twotaildog Old Poop

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    I'm not up to speed on what's going on with flat heads, but it seems to me that a super-charged flattie would be a natural combination. The super charger takes advantage of the naturally low static CR, without losing the other advantages of a flat head combustion chamber. Just a thought.




    Kevin
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  7. Old Mule

    Old Mule Long timer

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    Regarding vintage Indians, from Motor Sport, Feb. 1942, reminisces of a Brooklands racer in the 1920s, : "...at a local garage, where I found time to build up my own 'special' Indian. I had spotted in a corner of Indian's workshop in Euston Road some time before, the frame, with five gallon tank, of the machine which Reuben Harveyson rode in the first and only 500 mile race in 1921. At the same time I had ontained the cylinder barrels and heads of LeVack's eight valve engine with which he had done 107 mph in 1920. Using a 1914 I over E crankcase assembly I plugged and re-tapped the holding-down bolt locations to suit the new barrels and heads, made up suitable pushrods and tappets, induction and exhaust pipes etc., using a standard three-speed Indian box, standard road wheels, and specially side-strutted forks, as I had ideas for my favorite event, the 200-mile sidecar race. The exhaust ports on these four-valve heads were liberally drilled, so that, as well as exhausting through the normal port and pipe, the flaming gasses blew out all around the port branch itself, LeVack suffered from badly burnt muscles when riding the short fixed-gear eight valver, known as the "camel" owning to its humped appearance, and I had seen Capt. A G Miler with sheets of asbestos round his legs riding the same machine. It was necessary to plug these holes for road work and to comply with the existing silencer regulations. I put many hours of work into this machine...but I sold it. My leathers and crash hat are carefully stored."

    Interesting, I thought.
  8. Twotaildog

    Twotaildog Old Poop

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    Those were the days. I wonder what happened to that machine.




    Kevin


    .
  9. Old Mule

    Old Mule Long timer

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    Like all racing machines of the day it was tossed aside when its usefulness ended. My friend Michael Dregne, in his book "Inside Ferrari" described the yard where GP and LeMans cars were thrown and stacked after they'd been stripped for parts. Ah well!
  10. k-moe

    k-moe Long timer

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    Gun barrels aren't made of tubing.
    What gun manufacturers have in common with engine manufacturers (and by extension, motorcycle manufacturers) is the need for good machine tools, and the machinists to operate them.
    Old Mule likes this.
  11. revmaaatin

    revmaaatin Sioux Empire Iron Horse

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    ...while it is true modern rifle gun barrels are not 'tubing', the earliest rifle barrels were a type of tubing. sort of, and hence (perhaps) the tubing-gun-history in Birmingham, UK; but that is just a guess.

    Gun barrel @tubing;
    You can see it 'done', forging a piece of flat stock into a tube at the Colonial Williamsburg, VA.
    The colonial gun makers exhibit, a piece of flat stock is heated and rolled length wise and welded, worked into what is initially a very crooked tube, then continued to work into a fairly straight tube, (filed and browned) and finally the rifiing is cut, one grove at a time. this link,
    http://www.history.org/foundation/journal/autumn00/gunsmith.cfm
    ...fourth picture down show them forging the barrel.
    snip
    Barrel. The barrel was the long tube through which the bullet passed. Barrel makers began work with a flat wrought-iron bar. This was forged into a tube by heating, hammering, and fusing with flux. The tube was bored with a reamer for a uniform interior. The barrel was tested, or proofed. That involved firing the barrel with four times the normal amount of gunpowder. This was done at stationary stand, and barrel testers used a fuse to clear the area. If the barrel could withstand this without exploding, it was ready to use.
    unsnip

    Unfortunately the article does not show enough pictures; at the actual exhibit, there is ~ 7 pieces that represent the stages of the barrel production.
    m1.
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  12. Twotaildog

    Twotaildog Old Poop

    Joined:
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    Location:
    upstate Nebraska
    A quick status of what is going on with Patience. I've got three Machinists and a magneto guy working on parts. New rocker bushings are being made, a spare cylinder is having fins and valve seats repaired, and the D2 for the cam followers is on order. I have oversized tappets coming from Sweden. I just got a box of new crank pins and pinions. Two transmission cases have been rebushed and are ready to assemble. The spare mag is being rebuilt by the same guy who did last years mag. I put an order in for more pistons. Now I can focus on the holidays. Hoping all of this will come together in January, and I can build a motor.

    Wishing a blessed and merry Christmas to you and yours. Be well and happy.




    Kevin


    .
    zookster and k-moe like this.
  13. k-moe

    k-moe Long timer

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    While correct, your example has not much at all to do with post ww2 (or post ww1) firearms production. I think that the firearms to motorcycle connection has more to do with industrial capacity and market demand than it does to being able to make a particular part. It's all very interesting though; an example of the interconnectedness of seemingly disparate enterprises.
  14. Rich B

    Rich B Long timer

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    Merry Christmas to you and yours as well. And best wishes for you and Patience’s in 2018.

    Now I have 2 forums each with a Cannonball thread to follow for 2018.
  15. 1911fan

    1911fan Master of the Obvious

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    Did you ever decide whether or not you are doing T-shirts? And when we we know the Idaho/Oregon route, so we can plan to spectate and offer advice?


    1911fan
  16. Twotaildog

    Twotaildog Old Poop

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    Yes! I'm working on T-shirts, hopefully I will have them out early in January.

    They don't tell us the actual route until the night before we ride it, but I believe Jason is planning on releasing the list of cities that we'll stop in soon, whenever he gets the website up and running. I'll keep you posted.




    Kevin


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  17. 1911fan

    1911fan Master of the Obvious

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    Yah, list of cities and dates would be cool.... I'd ride down for a day or two.


    1911fan
  18. Twotaildog

    Twotaildog Old Poop

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    Personally, I think the best way to see the Cannonball and meet the riders is to walk around the hotel parking lots in the evening while the riders are working on their bikes. When we're on the road we're often on narrow, shoulderless roads and we're already causing congestion, so trying to ride along could potentially just cause more confusion. Also, if we stop at a town with a HD dealer, they often throw an event at their dealership where you can watch us arrive, and look at the bikes and talk to the riders. The website should be up soon and should have information.




    Kevin


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  19. Jim K in PA

    Jim K in PA Long timer

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    I have to concur with the above advice from Kevin. In 2016 we met up with the CB-ers near York, PA. That's when I also wound up getting deeply into a 1914 JAP owned by Chris Knoop of Australia(#16). We helped him with some fuel tank issues and had that thing in pieces, chasing parts down at the local auto parts store, and working well past dark by flashlight. Fantastic opportunity. We just walked up and offered to lend a hand. Unfortunately, we got subsumed into Chris' challenges before I had a chance to hunt down Kevin! Sorry man! I did see you roll into the hotel lot, though. :thumb

    [​IMG]
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  20. 1911fan

    1911fan Master of the Obvious

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    This is my intention, I guess my post did not make it clear. My plan is to ride down the day you'll be there, grab a hotel room, and hang out for the evening. Then ride home the next day. Just depends on where I'd be riding to/from, dates, and whether or not I have to be home whelping puppies (see sig; currently 20 puppies on the ground and another litter due next week).


    1911fan
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