Prefab sheds

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by WrenchMonkey, May 15, 2018.

  1. WrenchMonkey

    WrenchMonkey Two wheel slave

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2015
    Oddometer:
    58
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    So I bought a house with a small garage. I know stupid for a guy with bikes and cars and tools but the boss is happy with the rest so I compromised. Now I need a smaller shed in the backyard to clear out all the excess yard accoutrements. I had a 9x9’ Slab poured when I had the patio put in and I plan to put an 8x8’ wood shed on there. Anyone have any recommendations? Tuff shed is pretty pricey and they also won’t assemble it closer than 5’ to the property line. I don’t need much but I don’t want it to look like garbage. I also don’t need a floor in it as I have brand new concrete. How about this one?
    https://m.lowes.com/pd/Heartland-Co...Belmont-Gable-Engineered-Storage-Shed/4507030
    #1
    mrchristian likes this.
  2. rapidoxidationman

    rapidoxidationman Easily trainable

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2006
    Oddometer:
    11,604
    Location:
    The Teton Rockies
    If the concrete is flat, bolt some pressure treated 2x4 sill plates to it and build. An 8x8 won't be much more than $1K in materials.
    #2
  3. zap2504

    zap2504 Dave E.

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2006
    Oddometer:
    996
    Location:
    Middletown, PA
    #3
  4. phreakingeek

    phreakingeek adventurer

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,615
    Location:
    VA
    in some counties, if you attach a shed permanently you are required to get a permit. So, that said, you can build a shed on the pad but if you actually bolt it down...it may be a problem later. Never hurts to call the county and find out...from a payphone :lol3

    #4
  5. rapidoxidationman

    rapidoxidationman Easily trainable

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2006
    Oddometer:
    11,604
    Location:
    The Teton Rockies
    That's a good point. Something else that may be in play is size requirements for a permit: Around here if it is less than a 10x10 footprint no permit is required. That said, if ya can't see it from the road...
    #5
    1greenmachine and ozmoses like this.
  6. phreakingeek

    phreakingeek adventurer

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,615
    Location:
    VA
    Yeah, for our county you need a permit if it's over 150sqft or if it is permanently attached to the land. So even a tiny shed would fall into that requirement if you pour a slab and bolt it down. Plenty of folks will pour a slab and build a shed on top or use cinder blocks as a foundation and build it with floor joists and plywood floor. Only seems to matter if the neighbors complain though...
    #6
  7. jb882

    jb882 13HP of fury.

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2014
    Oddometer:
    678
    Location:
    Peoples republic of Taxachusetts
    On the prefab's..

    i helped a buddy out one together that was similar to that one just with a gambrel roof on it. It was all 2x3 construction and the sheathing was most of the actual structure. At the time we both thought it was kind of cheap and didn't think it would last very long but he didn't care, he needed to get a few years out of it as he was renting this place. Well, he ended up living there for about 5 years and had no issue with it in his time. Fast forward another 20 years and the thing is still standing so that would put it at 25 years old or so. I drive by there every once in a while and its still there. Its withstood blizzards, hurricanes and years of general neglect since the house he was renting at the time has been vacant for close to a decade now. Bottom line is they do seem to work just fine. His biggest gripe with it was the height, the walls were not tall enough to have yard tools and such.

    That said if you are planning on staying where you are long term i would think about building your own so you and make it it exactly what you need and not have to compromise. I did just that when i did mine and i'm glad i did. I was able to build it with full height walls and all 2x4 construction and i built it bigger than any i could find locally. My shed will outlive me easily.
    #7
  8. WrenchMonkey

    WrenchMonkey Two wheel slave

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2015
    Oddometer:
    58
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    I don’t want to pull permit and I don’t think the neighbors will mind. It’s not seen from the street and it’s far enough away from everyone else nobody will see it. As far as building from the ground up I’m not the most carpentry oriented. I’d rather have one that was mostly assembled and can go together in a weekend. It’ll be for some shelves for lawn stuff. I have a crawl space for other storage and an extra room off the back of the house that’s heated for winter bike building. This is all great info thanks guys

    I do plan on staying for a while as we just bought the place. I’d like to be here at least 10 years. I don’t want plastic either as I’d have a hard time selling that to the wife
    #8
  9. nuggets

    nuggets It's all my fault...

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2010
    Oddometer:
    3,172
    Location:
    Virgina
    #9
  10. zap2504

    zap2504 Dave E.

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2006
    Oddometer:
    996
    Location:
    Middletown, PA
    FWIW I assembled my 8x10 shed in 1 day, never have to paint it, never need to worry about replacing shingles, never have to worry about termites or rot. No problem with wife's observations as it looks more like a little cottage than a shed.
    #10
    Richy likes this.
  11. CA_Strom

    CA_Strom Cunning Linguist

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,021
    Location:
    The Temples of Syrinx (So. CA)
    I went with a 10x15 tuff shed and I'm quite happy with the quality and finished product. However, if they won't build within 5' of your property line, take a look at the prefab kits sold online by Coscto. They include shipping and I put one up at my last house with zero issues. https://www.costco.com/sheds.html
    #11
  12. WrenchMonkey

    WrenchMonkey Two wheel slave

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2015
    Oddometer:
    58
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    It sounds like the consensus is the prefab ones aren’t all too bad. Just a matter of picking the right size and style. I don’t mind roofing or painting. Thanks for the info I knew you guys would be able to help. And for the record I’m 6’8” but I plan on spending no time in there. It’ll be solely for storage and I’ll just deal with the door height.
    #12
  13. tenmile

    tenmile Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2009
    Oddometer:
    223
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    Where in Denver are you? I had a shed built a few years ago by a Tuff-Shed type company when I was living in Boulder. Was about the same price as the plastic kits, half the price of Tuff-Shed, and great quality. Seems like there's a few of those companies around still.
    #13
  14. dhally

    dhally Hammerhead

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2006
    Oddometer:
    4,215
    Location:
    Kennewick, WA
    I built a 12x16 on a slab. The problem I had with prefab was the height restricts how tall of shelving can be installed, which limits the total storage capacity.
    #14
  15. mrchristian

    mrchristian Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2008
    Oddometer:
    784
    Location:
    LA, CA
    I have that kit. Barely fit into the bed of my Tacoma. Took a few weekends to build. Instructions were OK. Fits 3 dirt bikes if you puzzle piece them in. Maybe cost $1,000 all in but I wasn't keeping track of costs. Latch isn't great quality.
    #15
  16. Tall Man

    Tall Man Priest, Temple of Syrinx

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2007
    Oddometer:
    4,689
    Location:
    The Occident
    If I can see my shed on Google Earth, so can the County Planning Dept. -- i.e., the folks who issue permits, and who will cite me if they "see" something for which a permit was required but never originally issued.

    Satellite images are the newest tool in the property appraisal tool box. We can't hide.

    I obtained a permit, as I was required to do, prior to having my shed delivered. It was a simple and inexpensive process.
    #16
    phreakingeek likes this.
  17. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2010
    Oddometer:
    5,765
    Location:
    below the sea
    [​IMG]
    Mine is 9x13. and bolted to a pre-existing slab. Holds the mower, ride-on, a few wheel barrows, a tub of spent coffee grounds and other gardening tools. I think it cost about £350 4 or 5 years ago. Thin metal, and you have to stoop to enter, but the size for the price, not bad.

    Our planning regs would only apply if it had foundations. Bolted down - it is a permitted "temporary structure". Must be one of the few occasions where UK rules are laxer than US.
    #17
  18. fast4d

    fast4d Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,014
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    tuff shed is nice and FAST but $$$$$. you got a few thousand to spend?
    #18
  19. gweaver

    gweaver NorCal is Best Cal!

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2005
    Oddometer:
    2,589
    Location:
    Sonoma County, CA
    Our house came with a shed, which I'm going to need to rebuild soon. Fool that built it did a crap job with the roof edging and the plywood under the shingles is rotting on the edges. Seems to be a solid argument for building your own if you have the skills and tools. Put the door where you want it, add outlets and windows where you want, make it fit your needs. When I rebuild, I'm planning to do a lean-to style- while a peaked roof is nice to stand it, it seems to be more wasted space as far as shelving goes. Figure I'll just build it a little taller, but keep the max height at or below where the current roof peak is- won't be visible to the neighbor, so all should be good.
    G
    #19
  20. kenstone

    kenstone worn out

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2013
    Oddometer:
    1,600
    Location:
    Boysee
    My neighbor bought a "kit" shed from Home Depot and bought the assembly too.
    One guy showed up with the "kit" with the walls prebuilt and completely assembled it in less than 4 hours.
    I don't know what the assembly cost but it might be something worth looking into.
    Another neighbor bought just the kit and he, his wife, and a friend assembled it...they're divorced now though :lol2.
    just kidding, watched them assemble it, quite entertaining, it was apparent none them had any building experience but the neighbor had boasted about prior builds.
    :lol3
    #20