Quit our jobs, sold our home, gone riding...

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by lightcycle, Aug 1, 2012.

  1. dsmack

    dsmack Adventurer

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    "In the morning, we shook the water out of our shelter. I think the tent is done. And so are we. We're tired and miserable and we just found out the place we called home for the last half decade will have to be binned." :(

    ??????
    Anxiously awaiting further news..... :y0! :dirtdog
    Don
  2. DantesDame

    DantesDame Ridin' Fool Super Moderator

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    If you weren't such a cheapskate you could have taken the ferry from one village to the next :fishie

    [​IMG]
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  3. Gadget_65

    Gadget_65 Adventurer

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    Happy New Year weary travellers. I hope you find the rest you need to recharge your batteries to give you fuel to carry on your epic adventure and a nice new waterproof tent. May 2018 bring you much happiness. Lang may yer lum reek.
    rascalman, Sunday Rider and Rippin209 like this.
  4. Steve G.

    Steve G. Long timer

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    The strangest feelings I have for you both. The feeling of extreme envy of your touring adventure, knowing that I and most others toil in the real world of mortgages, cutting the lawn, going to work at 6am, getting home at 6pm. And the strange sadness that you're worn out and want to just go to SE Asia, and do more of it.

    Conflicted.
    SmilinJoe and cruiserbiker like this.
  5. Turkeycreek

    Turkeycreek Gringo Viejo

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    Looking forward to another year of your travels. accounts and photos. Feliz Año Nuevo!
  6. mattsz

    mattsz moto-gurdyist

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    Don - don't worry, sometimes a tent is just a tent...
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  7. lightcycle

    lightcycle Nomad

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    We ended up getting a new tent. :thumb
  8. lightcycle

    lightcycle Nomad

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    Thank you! Happy New Year to you too! :freaky
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  9. lightcycle

    lightcycle Nomad

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    Muchas gracias! Feliz Año Nuevo para ti también!
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  10. lightcycle

    lightcycle Nomad

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    You've touched upon something which I'm very sensitive to. That travel fatigue is probably the most First World-ish of problems you could ever have: "Omigod, I'm soooo tired of not working and traveling all over the world by motorcycle!"

    I totally understand that hearing something like that makes you want to high-five the person that said it.

    In their face.

    With a chair.

    :boid

    I try not to harp about it too much on the blog, but the way we were feeling then had significance to how and where our journey ended up, so I thought I'd record it to give context to our decision-making process. More in the next blog entry.

    Some other factors behind our on-line whining and travel fatigue:

    - We don't get nor expect any support or sympathy from our friends in real life about something as trivial as travel fatigue. And rightfully so. Our problems pale in comparison. So we only share it with our other traveler friends who have gone through the same thing and the only other place I talk about it is on our blog.

    Because when the writing ends and everybody stops reading, this will still be our story that we'll re-read over and over again in our old age. We need it to be as accurate and reflective of our experiences. If people hate us for it, I'm okay with it. Ultimately this blog isn't for them, it's for us.

    - So why not just stop traveling then? The main reason is because we sacrificed everything to go on this trip. We gave up stable, well-paying careers that we had worked for decades to establish. We sold our home in a rising market and then watched its market value continue to take off, rocketing away from us. But perhaps most importantly, we left behind close friends and family and didn't see them for years. Some of those relationships didn't survive our time away.

    There were some negative consequences to our decision to take a different course in life. If we're going to call this trip done, it better be for a very good reason given all the sacrifices we made. Because there definitely will not be a second chance at this after we've rebuilt our life, careers and relationships.

    Sorry to dump all this on a reply to you, it's totally not directed at you personally, Steve. You've been so supportive of our trip here and on BCSB and I truly appreciate it! :-) Your comments just provided a frame for me to explain a little bit where we're coming from.

    tldr: People will hate us because we complain about travel fatigue. And then reasons.
  11. oldbeer

    oldbeer Been here awhile

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    Dear Gene and Neda...Happy new year...I have not posted on your ride report before but have spent many happy hours reading of your travels.

    But feel moved to say that I don't mind hearing about your travel fatigue. That's what you were feeling at the time and that's what anyone wanting to do something similar can expect to feel.

    Your report is very entertaining and for me the perfect blend of photos and words.

    I'm sure anyone else who has taken the time to read your posts will agree.

    All the best from NZ.
  12. Not the Messiah

    Not the Messiah Old enough to know better, but slow learnin'

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    Hi Gene and Neda,
    As always, your candor on the travel fatigue issue is appreciated. Yes it is very much a first world problem but that harsh label doesn't diminish the significance of it to you and Neda. I sincerely hope for yourselves that you are already finding a solution to it.
    And of course for our sakes, I'm hoping that the travels continue in some form and that the reports keep coming!
    Happy New Year to youse!
    Brian
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  13. ross

    ross Been here awhile

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    Gene,
    I appreciate learning about the travel fatigue as well as the good in the report. I would not have known travel fatigue was a thing. While I don't foresee being bold enough to sell it all and live on the road, I have dreams of doing extended several month long trips in a few years. I think from a perspective it helps people who read your travels to hear all the pitfalls, no one really knows what something is like unless they have done it. Keep up the great report complete and pics, and please continue to include the pitfalls of travel. Happy New Year!!!
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  14. Jbone11 11

    Jbone11 11 Long timer

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    :lol3
    BAh! Non sense mate. No explanation needed. if anyone hates on you guys for getting burnt out from time to time, they ain't worth a thought. Travelling is fun and amazing, but anything, even fun stuff can get bloody tiresome eventually. So yeah.... as someone who's lived abroad for the better part of 10 years and hoping to do it again some day, I hear ya loud and clear. I also know its temporary and that you wake up the next day (or the day after that.... :)) going WTF were we on about...this is awesome! LOL!

    Now.... having said all of that, it is currently -33C in Ottawa with the windchill, so I can't even right now..... can't even :vardy:nah:becca:lol3:D:D
  15. Steve G.

    Steve G. Long timer

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    No problem Gene, dump away. I was kind of looking for that actually, a long explanation of the situation. Thankyou very much. And best of travels in 2018!!
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  16. DrydenRider

    DrydenRider Sun Seeker

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    One of the things that keeps me drawn to this report is the question of how you do it. You guys are rock stars, I get travel fatigue after a few weeks for cripes sake. The other thing that draws me is the question of what is the end game, or does it just simply go on. You guys are my Truman show in a way. I talk about you and your adventures, over coffee, like I know you personally. I think we all owe a debt of gratitude to you and Neda for sharing your story even though you do have your own reasons for it.

    Yes it is a first world problem but it is as real as any problem to you so when you vent a bit, it is understood. Onward....
  17. Blader54

    Blader54 Long timer

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    Neda and Gene! Happy New Year! From my perspective you guys are on an amazing journey that has both outer and inner aspects. The outer journey is the physical movement through the landscape. Then there is the inner journey - your impressions, thoughts, feelings, etc as you go along. I think what you guys are doing is a very rare thing: an open-ended nomadism. I mean, it seems to me that most nomadic cultures involve treks from summer pasture to winter pasture and back again on an annual basis, with probably some movement within each pasture each season. They tend to follow the same routes, so they have familiar landmarks along the way and each pastureland is a familiar place. They don't just gather their flock/herd and head off for points unknown, perhaps never to return. But that's what you guys did and are doing. That it turns out to be difficult to stay "on the road" (both journeys) in an uninterrupted fashion, always seeking the new and unexplored may be a very human reaction, a sort of overload due to constant change. It may not be humanly possible to just roam endlessly.....though I think an argument can be made that you guys are exploring that space in a way few others have done before you. Your journey may have identified a human need for physical and social stability that cannot be entirely overcome, even through modern social networking technology. In that context your sojourn in Thailand can be seen as a "return to your winter pasture." If there is a winter pasture, is there a summer one as well? We shall, perhaps, see. Perhaps the answer will be "the rest of the world", or instead there is a different summer pasture each year. It fascinates me to think there might be something deeply human about travel that serves as a common denominator between first-world, 21st century moto-nomads, and ancient herding cultures. Thanks again for letting us read your blog! Enjoy the fruits of the winter pasture to their fullest!
    Sunday Rider, rascalman and Scooter22 like this.
  18. Old Dudes Matter

    Old Dudes Matter Adventurer

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    Hi Gene and Nedra,
    I totally agree with DrydenRider, you two are Rock Stars. I have been subscribed to your thread for about a year now and thoroughly enjoy each post. I do curse you for adding to my bucket list of places to see, Your photography is second to none, Travel fatigue is real, and I am in total awe of how you two push on.
    Cheers, Happy New Year, and safe travels.

    Tim
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  19. mattsz

    mattsz moto-gurdyist

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    Ok, here's my two cents...

    I had a few important philosophical and affirmitive statements to make, but worthier inmates than I have already made most of them - so... what they said ☝️...

    I would add one thing, though, regarding your friends who didn't / don't support your decision. It's easy to say "feck 'em", but it may not be so easy to do. People react to interesting things in interesting ways, sometimes. I, for one, appreciate your candor and your open way of telling us about your choices without fear of judgement - and without preaching. I have some friends I really care about, who have done a similar thing to you guys (but not on motorcycles) and keep a travel blog about their experiences - and they're constantly lecturing about how if you aren't cashing everything in to live your dream then you aren't living at all. I'd like to continue following their adventure, but always being chided that I'm a prisoner in a cell of my own making if I don't drop it all and hit the road, gets old. I actually approve of and can relate to their experiences, but am considering letting them go. They'll still be great friends, but I don't know if I want to continue following their travels...

    So, keep doing what you're doing - we will keep reading!

    ps: this kind of discussion is also why I read your blog here instead of directly at ride.com...
  20. lightcycle

    lightcycle Nomad

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    Updated from http://www.RideDOT.com/rtw/376.html

    [​IMG]

    We've been on the road for a very long time.

    And for all that time, we really haven't covered a lot of ground when we look at where we've been on the atlas. As mentioned in the last blog post, part of the reason behind our slow travel is that once we're in a new place, country or continent, we want to explore *every single nook and cranny*. We're just not happy with the highlights. Most places we've departed from, either because of family emergencies, visa restrictions or cold weather, there's always a lingering sense of regret that there were still things we left undiscovered.

    There's only been a couple of places that we truly feel we did justice: Five months in Colombia left us satisfied, two rounds around Central America and we were good to continue on. And now, after two years in Europe... I think we've poked around quite a lot of it - from North to South (Nordkapp to the French Riviera), West to East (British Isles to behind the Iron Curtain) - we're leaving on our terms, without even a twinge of FOMO.

    But before we go, we want to make a just a couple more social calls. First stop: Milan.

    [​IMG]
    Rest and relaxation in Milan

    Since we're not sure when we're going to be returning to Europe, we're staying in town for a couple of weeks to spend as much time as possible with Neda's sister and her family.

    Goga organizes a hike one day. This is the perfect opportunity for me to get caught up with the blog, so I bow out gracefully... :)

    When they all got back, I found some fantastic pictures on the camera that Neda took of their hike! Check them out:

    [​IMG]
    Family portrait: Goga, Tea and Mladen