Rally Raid Products BMW G310R / G310GS

Discussion in 'Vendors' started by ktmmitch, May 25, 2017.

  1. ktmmitch

    ktmmitch Long timer

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    The main difference between our all our 3 Tractive shocks for the G310GS is that they have the correct sag set, as the OEM shock sits down quite a bit, either loaded or unloaded, due to the very soft spring fitted.
    So even though our Low shock can vary between 10-35mm less seat height than stock(depending where the adjuster on the shock is set) I found the bike still leant over enough, but obviously not as much as with a standard, or our Level 2 shock.
    I agree that probably fitting a shorter R side stand would return it back to more like stock with the shorter shock fitted, or even just cut and weld the OEM side stand, as its steel and would be simple to do.
    I'll try and get pictures at our local dealer at the weekend of both GS and R models with the Low shocks fitted on their stands.
    Two different low shocks are needed for the GS and R versions, as the OEM shock lengths are 14mm different, due to the increased travel and seat height on the GS, but Tractive are making us them this week to try out for prospective customers at the dealer who are struggling with seat height on both models.
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  2. Matt-J2

    Matt-J2 Been here awhile

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    Perfect, this is what I was hoping to hear. I didn't know if there was any extra special voodoo for offroad suspension specifically, so thanks for the extra info! I'm still not 100% sure if I'll be heading off road in future, but seeing this bike and what you guys are doing with it is certainly pushing me that way!
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  3. ktmmitch

    ktmmitch Long timer

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    Our intrepid A-Team (Adam Mitch & Amy Harburg) are motoring along Down Under on the pair of BMW G310GS bikes, well on their way around the 3,500km course, hoping to finish on Saturday before riding back to Sydney.
    Follow them with their SPOT trackers as they near the northern turn point.

    APC TRACKING LINK
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  4. ktmmitch

    ktmmitch Long timer

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    Another part of the BMW G310GS jigsaw of acccesories is finalised today.
    Thanks to Tractive Suspension for letting us use a scaled-down version of their tried-and-tested Fork Preload Adjuster Cap to work with the slightly smaller diameter upside-down forks on the little GS adventure.
    This neat CNC machined adjuster cap will give up to 12mm of preload adjustment simply by turning the centre 22mm hex head in the centre, and also has an M4 threaded bleed screw that can have auto-decompressor caps fitted as an option.
    These will be suppled with both Level 1 (std length) & Level 2 (plus 25mm) Fork Kits, with new longer & stiffer linear-wound springs more suited to off-road conditions.
    Black anodised and laser-marked for production.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
  5. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    Hi Matt - no problem - certainly we appreciate there are likely to be a whole range of potential owners looking at this new BMW - some from a dirt/dual-sport background who want something a little more comfortable to ride on those sections of highway between trails (instead of potentially trailering their bikes over any distance), to those from a mainly road-bike background, who are perhaps looking to expand their riding horizons and take in a few unpaved roads and trails to get further into the countryside - either way, the smaller lighter dimensions of this bike (compared to larger ADV machines) coupled with being relatively affordable in the first place means the 310 ought to hold significant appeal.

    With regard to 'off-road' suspension - other than overall longer travel (to help soak up larger hazards more easily), there are subtleties to the damping and preload/spring-rate set-up that you can begin to more fully appreciate once you start to ride in the dirt - but generally speaking, those are equally appropriate to either the LEVEL 1 or LEVEL 2 shock, the LEVEL 2 shock just gives you the ability to fine tune the individual damping characteristics more accurately.

    I won't try and be too confusing here - there is a brief suspension 101 on page 2 of this thread: Here - but essentially the damping characteristics and specifically the relationship between how the spring compresses and then extends again (compression and rebound damping) can be 'tuned' to improve traction on certain surfaces and under certain conditions - ie. sand vs gravel vs rocks, and laden and unladen.

    However, as I always say with regard to the TracTive suspension we've specifically developed for both the CB500X and now the G310GS 'Adventure' upgrades, by it's nature 'Adventure' bike suspension has offer a wide range of capability without the need for constant adjustments - since you are often experiencing a multitude of conditions in a single journey.

    Fortunately by using high-quality components that are designed to react, cycle and recover quickly, once you've got the basic characteristics dialled-in for your weight and intended load, you can really just get on and ride, and let the suspension do the work.

    for info. some adjustments you may want to consider prior to a specific ride might be to add a little preload to return the sag to around the unladen height if you are carrying a lot of luggage compared to solo, together with backing off the shock rebound damping a touch (since the extra weight on the rear of the bike will naturally damp the return action of the spring). Similarly you may want to add a little compression damping to slow the rate at which the spring compresses under the extra load, but as I say, in general, once you've got the bike dialled in, you can leave it alone unless dramatically changing your load and/or riding environment.


    In addition - as I touch on in the original suspension post on page 2 - it's worth noting that the correct damping can also help with improving traction when riding [off-road] over a variety of different surfaces... If the damping is too hard/slow, the spring cannot react quickly enough to the changing surface, the bike can feel jittery or detached, leading the front end washing out and the rear-end stepping out/sliding for example. Similarly, too little damping will also affect directional stability as the bike can feel like you're riding on blancmange, and you can end up pogoing over rougher and rocky surfaces.

    As for your overall spring rate/stiffness: a stiffer spring might be better for landing big jumps (like an MX bike), but that is not really the style of riding you'd be undertaking with any regularity on a 170Kg 'Adventure' bike... (never mind a 200+Kg one!). Generally speaking, the reason ADV bikes tend to have comparatively soft suspension [compared to road/sport touring bike] is for both comfort and traction - a softer, longer travel suspension will track rough surfaces and maintain grip and control far better than a more stiffly sprung/shorter travel machine.

    So in that regard - on a long[er] travel Adventure bike, I always recommend you err on the the slightly softer side when choosing your initial spring rate - ie. if you feel you're on the cusp of medium and hard, go for medium - then control that spring's action [depending on conditions] with the damping and preload; whereas conversely if the spring you've chosen is too hard initially, you can only ever adjust it in one direction.

    Obviously if you plan to regularly carry a lot more load, you might want to consider a stiffer spring rate to support that weight (without having to crank the preload right up), but again I would reiterate that while we offer a guideline weight range for the various spring rates available, in practice the range [and adjustability] of our TracTive suspension is much wider than simply numerically defined perimeters.

    Hope that helps!

    Jenny x
  6. MichaelJ

    MichaelJ Long timer

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    THANK YOU for saying "damping" and not "dampening".

    I hate it when my suspension gets damp. :D
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  7. Matt-J2

    Matt-J2 Been here awhile

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    It definitely helps, thanks again!
  8. Dualsport Chic

    Dualsport Chic Long timer

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    Stopped again at my local BMW dealer on the way home from work today - sat on the baby GS once again - will definitely need the lower shock. I'll road test it next month standard length but tips of toes barely touch the ground. We'll have to see how it handles during the review ride next month and if I won't mind sliding on the seat to get a foot down at stops etc.

    Jenny - I'm with you - black is my color of the three.
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  9. MichaelJ

    MichaelJ Long timer

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    The low seat helped more than I thought it would.
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  10. Dualsport Chic

    Dualsport Chic Long timer

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    Where did you find it felt better than stock. Tonight when sitting on the bike, it felt like the edges of the seat that hit the inside of either thigh were too sharp - like they could have been shaved down a bit so my legs would hang straighter. But my reservation with the low seat is comfort for long 400+ mile days when getting to/from the adventure playground of my choosing.
  11. MichaelJ

    MichaelJ Long timer

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    The ability to reach the ground. I went from a full ballet "sur les pointes" to being able to get my toes flat and actually have the balls of my feet touching.

    +1 on the edges - both seats.

    As far as comfort goes, I haven't really noticed any significant difference between the two. OTOH, I don't have any significant miles on it yet. Time will tell. Worst case is I put the original seat back on and get in touch with Gene Simmons' boot maker.

    I think that there's going to be a visit to a custom seat maker sometime in the future - mainly to try and get rid of the edges up front.
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  12. Dualsport Chic

    Dualsport Chic Long timer

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    Try Renazco - out of California - they made a custom seat for my F650gs - which took me to my first IBA conquest in comfort!
  13. MichaelJ

    MichaelJ Long timer

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    Seems like all of the major saddle makers are in California - Meyer, Daylong, Laam...

    There's a guy in Rockville, MD (Longo) that I've heard good things about. He's close enough to visit and be back home in time for lunch.
  14. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    It's a similar situation for some CB500X riders too - the flat rider seat-pad area can feel quite square-edged, but it is reasonably easy to peel back the cover and slice the foam at 45° under the thigh area and refit - that might be all you need while keeping the main area under your bottom full thickness still?

    Jx
  15. MichaelJ

    MichaelJ Long timer

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    That is a thought - and since I have a "spare" seat to play with, I don't have to worry about messing it up completely.

    OTOH, it's only an issue when I'm stopped - something that I don't spend much time doing. :D
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  16. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    I agree - and I'm sure the reason the seat pad is the shape it is, is to offer better support to the thighs when you're actually riding along.

    Everything is a compromise ;o)

    Jx
  17. stevetheb

    stevetheb mashed potatoes

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    I'm cracking up over here. Thank you, sir!
  18. RAW

    RAW Long timer

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    Jmo,
    Would you mind providing more info comparing the CB500X to/with the 310GS?
    Or does that belong in another thread?
    I had a CB500X for a bit. But I'm seriously considering the 310 as my next bike.
  19. Dillo

    Dillo Almost Awesome

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    My last bike was a CB500X and my wife just bought a G310GS. I haven't ridden it much, but here's my observations:

    • The 310 feels quite narrow and light by comparison. Quite impressively so, actually.
    • The 310 is a very small bike. At 5'7" it feels like I'm sitting on a pit bike almost. The windscreen, dash, bar, and tank are much lower than I'm used to.
    • The ergos aren't very good at my height. On my CB the ergos were almost perfect, maybe the bars were just a touch low when standing. On the GS the bars are waaaay too low when standing, and even when sitting it just doesn't work for me.
    • The sound is sort of odd. My CB was a bit of a sewing machine, soundwise. The 310 sounds almost like what you'd get if you played the R1200GS's exhaust note through a crappy cell phone speaker. It's weirdly endearing at first but eventually the droning gets annoying.
    • The 310 is very vibey, especially at highway speeds.
    • The seat is very comfy, much better than the CB. Be warned that everyone's butt is different so this may not help you at all.
    • The windscreen doesn't really do anything. Which is an improvement over the windscreen on the CB which was only good for generating a ton of buffeting.
    • There isn't a lot of power. It's more torquey than my wife's old Ninja 300 but that's not saying much. It's anemic down low, and there isn't really any big hit of power up high. If you're used to smaller displacement engines you'll love it, but compared to my CB I wasn't really a fan. That being said my wife absolutely loves it, but other than one test ride on a F700GS the 310 is the biggest bike she's ridden.
    • The gearbox feels like it's made out of rubber. No feel or feedback whatsoever. On the upside, no false neutrals.
    • This may be a setup issue, but the rear brake is super mushy. Which I could live with...if it was adjustable. The height of the brake pedal is fixed because of the stupid switch design. If this matters to you you'll have to figure out some sort of spacer or riser to elevate the brake pedal surface.
    • The suspension is better than on the CB, not that that's saying much. I weigh about 215 in moto gear and the suspension is pretty decent on most roads, but it tends to clatter or get hung up on bigger potholes. Definitely underdamped in the rear as well so you get more of the same wallowing if you hit a mid-corner bump.
    • The brakes are meh. A set of good brake pads and they'd be fine for riding gently 2-up or aggressively 1-up with luggage. Perfectly fine for riding solo with minimal luggage or for any riding off road.
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  20. AdvHunter

    AdvHunter Adventurer

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    Any updates on the Rally?