Taking own food for short trips

Discussion in 'Americas' started by sajor, Aug 9, 2018.

  1. sajor

    sajor Been here awhile

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    Hey everyone, I live in the U.S (Arizona) and would like to know experiences on people who took their own food on short trips lets say 7 days max, im an avid backpacker and have a full ultra light cooking set and for backpacking trips i dehydrate my home made foods and just hydrate when im at camp , anyone done this any pros or cons of this method of traveling with your own food.
    #1
  2. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad Former World's Foremost Authority

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    Its exactly the same except you can carry more weight. I cheat however and did the CDR & HOW with a sidecar which gave so much room I carried a small collapsible ice chest!! Pert near "Glamping"!!

    DSCF0132.JPG
    #2
  3. Tewster2

    Tewster2 Long timer

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    When you hike it's a long ways walking to restaurants so carrying food makes sense....on the bike I just ride to one and eat...never carry food except for snacks...for me it's too much to fool with and places to eat are all over the place....but that's just me and I'm lazy.
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  4. kantuckid

    kantuckid Long timer

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    I do take dried dates for my snacks. Unless your riding the bike to the hike or camp it's #3
    Sitting on a PTW doesn't expend a whole hell of a lot of energy either, so the food needs change on the road. I don't happen to be that rider who rides all day for a piece of pie or a lunch stop either. I eat things like peanuts & a cold drink for lunch then chow down at night.
    In my world the good eats are found at home, (married to a COOK) not that we don't eat out when traveling and enjoy the change.
    This time of year fresh veggies dominate our table and sadly not seen much in anyone's restaurant?
    There's a guy down the road from me who is a FT sorghum producer and truck gardener but if you go to any restaurant nearby his farm they will be putting shipped in maters on your plate, seems stupid to me? Why these places cannot offer seasonal goodies like corn on the cob, maters, green beans(the real ones!) and so on is strange? as it would be a win/win combo. :-)
    Food rant over...:lol2
    #4
  5. sieg

    sieg Wearing out tires......2 at a time, day after day.

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    The restaurants are the reason I ride. :imaposer I like to pack light too, so I don't carry things I can buy anywhere along the road.
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  6. stormdog

    stormdog Long timer

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    I would hate to have to plan my routes and stop times around restaurants.
    I carry 3 days worth of food for back up and try to find a grocery store to buy fresh food each day
    If you like your food backpacking go for it
    #6
  7. ArrinD

    ArrinD Been here awhile

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    +1
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  8. ArrinD

    ArrinD Been here awhile

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    I did exactly that on the IDBDR.
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  9. Tewster2

    Tewster2 Long timer

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    No need to plan stops around restaurant locations....they are everywhere :lol3
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  10. stormdog

    stormdog Long timer

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    I notice you pro restaurant guys are all on the east side of the Rocky’s and us haul your food with you guys are out west
    I can run for a full day without even seeing a human let alone a Cracker Barrel
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  11. Tewster2

    Tewster2 Long timer

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    I’ve run all over the west for decades and have never run all day without stopping to eat someplace :thumb
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  12. Schmokel

    Schmokel I got peed on today.

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    I'm headed out for a five day, 1,200 mile trip. Bought a few packs of Ramen and some cup of rice things you just add water to. They way I have it planned, I've got places to eat on the way.
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  13. Tewster2

    Tewster2 Long timer

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    I carry a zip lock bag with pecans, walnuts, peanuts, and raisins mix...good for a snack or dinner if I don't want to walk/ride to a restaurant.
    #13
  14. sajor

    sajor Been here awhile

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    To each their own, but im sort of picky with the food i eat, most if not all restaurants or fast food places serve only have high processed food to sell to the masses, there are some places that serve somewhat fresh but you really have to find em and some might not be in your route or some are on the expensive side. What works for me is i eat a hearty breakfast, snacks for lunch and a light dinner (if its too heavy cant sleep).

    My weight for 5 days of food is near 3lb if that and since its a consumable as you ride it only gets lighter.
    #14
  15. Tewster2

    Tewster2 Long timer

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  16. jonz

    jonz Miles are my mantra

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    I'm a 'west' rider and I carry some food but not much. Since I need gas every day (or every 2nd day at the most), I eat a restaurant meal at least once a day. Since restaurant meals are usually higher calorie meals, I can get by with light stuff on the bike. I have an MSR Windburner stove/pot combo which is super convenient to use. When camping off my 400 and space is at a premium, I either skip the stove or I have an ultra light alcohol stove that fits in a 600ml titanium mug So I carry Starbucks Vias for my mandatory morning sunrise coffee, some packs of instant oatmeal, some packs of instant soup, usually one couscous repacked in a plastic bag, and maybe a Mountain House dinner or two. I also like to carry one instant pudding premixed with the required amount of powdered milk - tastes amazing.

    Being a 'west' rider though, I frequently camp where bears are a concern and I don't like cooking dinner where I camp. If I need to cook dinner, I do it early in the evening and then ride a ways before camping. I don't like camping where others camp because in some places, bears include campgrounds in their nightly patrols
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  17. Alcan Rider

    Alcan Rider Frozen Fossil

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    A lot depends upon your own preferences, i.e. do you want to spend much of your time cooking, or would you rather be riding? You don't expend a lot of energy riding, so your food requirements are lessened. A good breakfast at the first decent restaurant you come to, then some light snacks the rest of the day and you're good to go.

    But maybe the camping aspect of your ride is a major part of its attraction. In that case, do as you would do when hiking.

    There aren't any hard and fast rules except to be safe and have a good time.
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  18. pranajerni

    pranajerni Been here awhile

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    tastybite.com. can put in the sun or next to the engine or exhaust for a hot meal. can be eaten out of the bag and easy clean up. add some fresh produce[lots of it taste great raw] when you find it.
    #18
  19. dcwilcox

    dcwilcox Been here awhile

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    I typically don't camp every night so I eat in town on those occasions and I always carry food for a couple of days, plus snacks (jerky, nuts, dried fruit). Emergency rations if nothing else!
    #19
  20. High Country Herb

    High Country Herb Adventure Connoiseur

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    Yeah, it depends where you are travelling. If you are taking back country routes, carrying your own food and a method to cook it makes a lot of sense. If you are riding up the Pacific Coast Highway, it would be a shame to eat freeze dried hiking food in the parking lot of some awesome seafood restaurant.

    Personally, I do both. I try as many local restaurants/foods as I can, then plan accordingly when I know I'm heading out in the boonies. I don't generally cook off the bike, because my bike doesn't have huge cases like some big adv bikes. I will stop by a store and buy some sausage that can be cooked over a campfire with a stick, or just grab some jerky, granola bars, or dried fruit.

    It also pays to think ahead if you like an alcoholic drink in camp. Some of the best riding states have weird liquor laws. Low ABV beer, no purchases on Sunday, etc. I saved plastic pint and half pint whiskey bottles for travelling. I fill them with whatever I'm in the mood for on a given trip. Yukon Jack 100 proof is one of my favorites for camping in cold weather. If I know I will have access to cola, I'll take Bacardi 151. Just a couple swigs with the boys? Gentleman Jack.
    #20