The lost, the bumbling, obviously I'm Norwegian.

Discussion in 'Americas' started by Toten, Nov 21, 2017.

  1. Toten

    Toten Been here awhile

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    The word Skræling in Norwegian is still somewhat in use, mostly as "skral", which is translated to skinny.
    The vikings called both the inuits and the indians Skraelings.

    Leiv Eriksson didnt have any daughters, but he had a half-sister.
    That woman was a bitch, atleast the little I've found out about her:
    She mounted an expedition with two groups, one from Iceland and one with her, half-half agreements on loot and resources, max 35 men.
    Obviously she brought more, didnt let the other group store the loot in the building she had arranged, and after making peace with them, lied to her husband that they'd "had their way" with her, and that he was too little of a man to defend her honor.
    Obviously telling that to a viking is like pouring high octane gasoline on a fire, so he went over and killed the men, but not the women, that wasnt his style.
    "Hand me an axe" she said, and she killed the five women...

    Yup, that makes her a qualified bitch in my book..
    #41
  2. High Country Herb

    High Country Herb Adventure Connoiseur

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    Isn't the politically correct term "shield maiden"? :lol3

    "When Leif Erikson's pregnant half-sister Freydís Eiríksdóttir was in Vinland, she is reported to have taken up a sword, and, bare-breasted, scared away the attacking Skrælings." -Wiki
    #42
  3. kantuckid

    kantuckid Long timer

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    I may take that Leif holiday idea back?:rofl got enough questionable holiday people already?:-)

    A couple of modern day Norwegians have told me they travel cause they cannot afford to stay home? not so much to loot & pillage?:scratch
    #43
  4. Sjoerd Bakker

    Sjoerd Bakker Long timer

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    Thanks for that info , Toten ,it confirms my original suspicion. I always think it interesting and fun to dig up such roots , shows that there is a strong link of linguistic DNA connecting these languages ,even to a period before each might have developed as a different tongue .
    The standardized official Dutch dictionary will show " schraal " defined as lean, skinny, of little consequence and this word is used regularly every day . Clearly we are talking about the same word in two languages
    My spelling , skroal ( sounded diferently but recognizable and understandable in both idioms ) ,reflects the regional variant of Dutch into which I was born , a subset of regional Germanic which ,now titled under Nedersaksisch ( subset: Stellingwerfs ) , flows from NE Nederland across northern Germany into Denmark. In the distant past before national borders evolved the people could move about and still communicate fairly easily. After nation-states were established and an "official" language was adopted that fluidity slowly disappeared as schooling enforced the particular version up to the artificial boundary lines.The regionals are still spoken by locals who may have an interest ,although with the movement of people within any country such is becoming more difficult . The city folk retreating for retirement or recreation to the countryside plead ignorance and force everyone to switch into the " standard'"lingo and the kids all want to appear like city folk and start speaking that way all the time . A prime example of this is the Anglo- Spanish situation inthe USA border area - Spanish was the dominant European language of the first non-native settlers but the Anglos moved in and made life hard for Spanish speakers with schools trying to swing everybody over to English for a time .
    Ability to speak the regionals is not a sign of ignorance, illiteracy or backwardness , as was sometimes suggested by social climbers.
    Added to that , my locale was also within the range of the Frisian , an old language which shared with and gave much to the English and Friesland was also visited by Vikings so such connections and possible derivations are understandable .
    In Nicaragua there is even a monument someplace to what they claim was a visit by Vikings . I would not totally discount that , they were real serious travelers.More research is required, as they always conclude any scientific report
    . DSC06693.JPG Picture is of interior of one of the replica Viking communal houses at L'Anse Aux meadows, Newfoundland
    #44
  5. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    You need both paper map and GPS.
    #45
  6. kantuckid

    kantuckid Long timer

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    I was addicted to nicotine for 25 years, 1965 to 1989, FWIW.
    I "dipped" both-Copenhagen & Key snuff, not "Skoal", the wintergreen version.
    The brandname/word Skoal is seemingly so close a term and given the other brandname Copenhagen, it causes me to ask if there's a connection to the above mentioned term?
    For those who don't know, all those "dipping snuff's" are made from USA grown, dark fired tobacco's. Hung in a barn to cure and a fire is burned with the barn closed up.
    #46
  7. Sjoerd Bakker

    Sjoerd Bakker Long timer

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    Smoked tobacco it's called
    Is it sort of like" crystal - nic'. "
    for the nicotine - heads ? :bubba
    I live in the tobacco belt of Canada, the " Virginia leaf " type curing method .
    There are some smoke barns south of here towards Blenheim area.

    Isn't" skol " used as a Scandinavian equivalent to the English " bottoms up " or " cheers"

    The Danish connection might be that the stuff was commercialized by. a Danish tobacco importer / merchant .
    and the American chaw makers are cashing in on the supposed sophistication of sticking a wad of toxic leaves in the cheak and drooling crap out of the corners of the mouth .
    :lol3

    Tobacco will just be a novelty garden plant up there in Denmark no commercial growers .
    #47
  8. kantuckid

    kantuckid Long timer

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    Maybe no backer (ky word :lol2) but Netherlands they are #2 in the world in tomatoes and that's doing something considering the postage stamp space it's being done in!
    Snuff dippers don't drool "amber, nother KY word:lol2) as do leaf chewers...:-)
    #48
  9. Toten

    Toten Been here awhile

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    #RAILROAD
    :D

    Planning moves forward!
    #49
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  10. Toten

    Toten Been here awhile

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    #cast ressurrection

    Bike's in the box.
    Visum interview on wednsday.

    Then theres christmas
    then there's packing
    unpacking
    repacking
    unpacking again
    and chaos will ensue
    #50
  11. High Country Herb

    High Country Herb Adventure Connoiseur

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    Getting an early start packing the bike up, eh?

    The weather has been pretty nice here in California. Some winters we get nothing until December, so no guarantee it will stay that way. With the cool weather, the Pacific Coast Highway (Highway 1) should be mostly free of fog. Most of the Sierra Nevada passes are closed through April or so due to snow, but you can still go east on Highway 80 (probably icy) or around the south end through the desert, which is nice through late Spring.

    There is still one point on Highway 1 that will be closed through most of 2018.
    http://www.dot.ca.gov/cgi-bin/roads.cgi?roadnumber=1&submit=Search

    No worries, though, because there is an easy detour around it:
    https://www.google.com/maps/dir/Pla...4c54967d4!2m2!1d-121.3300909!2d35.7814021!3e0
    #51
  12. Toten

    Toten Been here awhile

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    Happy new year!

    Better to start panicking early than panic late :D
    I'll probably follow the weather, as best I can.
    If its too cold I'll just drive south, if its too warm I'll drive north.

    Packing is in effect.
    For me, as a young man who's never really bothered to bring stuff when travelling outside of a pair of shorts, some boxers, maybe some t-shirts to be safe, realising I'm going to need two suitcases, both overweight (20kg on plane, currently at 23'ish apiece)..
    IS ABSOLUTELY STAGGERING.
    I'm for once bringing more on a 5 month trip than my sister does on a weekend trip!
    Sheesh.

    Now if only I didn't need to pack my size 49 (14.5) gravel boots, they take half the goddamn suitcase, add a helmet and suddenly I'm standing there weighing it and hoping to various gods (depending on results) that it somehow weighs less than the last time I weighed it.

    I'll throw up some pictures when I have it organized neatly enough that I'm not (too) embarassed sharing pictures of it.
    #52
  13. boatpuller

    boatpuller Long timer

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    Your large boots can be worn onto the plane, and you can change them for slippers in your carry-on bag while on the plane, finding a place in the overhead compartment for the boots. Be nice if you put them each in a sack first to keep other's luggage clean.

    Keep in mind that there is a lot of camping and motorcycling gear available to buy here in the USA. If you need new stuff, wait until here to buy it. Plus, if Norway uses VAT, then you may find the gear much less expensive here. This includes helmets, but you might want to confirm your preferred brand is available.
    #53
  14. Toten

    Toten Been here awhile

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    Wearing them is an option I'm considering.

    I bought all my gear in germany before I decided to make the trip, it's only gonna be the pants, since I'll be wearing the jacket.
    Protection gear is too expensive to buy another set of while the one I've got is still in working order.
    Camping gear is mostly tried and true, the only wildcard is a Lone-Rider minitent, Fred was a gem and offered me a 50€ discount so I bought it, mainly so I have an alternative if I end up not liking the hammock for extended trips (most I've tried it was 3 days in a row). Will probably send one homebound before I start the TAT, I'm pretty sure the bags will go through a healthy trimming down before then.
    Sleeping bags for tall people with broad shoulders (me!) is a pain in the ass to find, and I've finally found one so I'm not letting it go until its worn out, then I'll probably order another one of the same stuff.

    Anyone ever tried packing softbags in the plastic wrap machine they usually offer at airports?
    #54
  15. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    I don't bother with suitcases for such a trip (weigh too much). Two sturdy cardboard boxes work better. Then plastic wrap them. OR everything is going on your bike, so put your stuff in the bike bags and then put them in cardboard box for air travel.
    #55
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  16. Toten

    Toten Been here awhile

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    Thats absolutely brilliant.
    No need to store suitcases, no need to return to where they're stored.

    That and realising I'll wear my goddamn biker boots on the flight, means I probably won't have to pay extra for more weight than regular.
    #56
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  17. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    You don’t need much. You can buy socks, T shirts, pants, shoes anywhere in the World. I can fit everything I need in two 2 foot square boxes, and board the plane in sandals and nylon pants. One much over adored item is denim......the jeans are bulky, cumbersome and stay wet for a week. Basically you need your preferred riding clothes/boots/helmet/gloves......the tools and spares are here.....everything else is just fluff.
    #57
  18. HickOnACrick

    HickOnACrick Groovinator

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    Camping in the USA can be very difficult in entire regions. Land in the US is either private or Federal. Private lands are owned by individuals and permission must be obtained from the owner to be on the property. Federal lands include parks, forests, military bases, and BLM (Bureau of Land Management). See this link: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/0f/US_federal_land.agencies.svg

    You can never camp on military bases, and may get shot trying.
    National Parks allow camping in designated spots only, are often reserved long in advance, and can be as expensive as a cheap motel for a single night. Many National Parks have "primitive" camp areas, but these are usually reserved for backpackers and you may not be able to access them on a bike. The drive-in campsites are usually crowded, but often quiet and offer amenities such as toilets, water, and sometimes showers. Your ability to find a spot at a National Park will depend on how many people visit the park. For example, it has been years since I found an open spot at Zion National Park, but Big Bend National Park has never been a problem.

    National forests (Forest Service) are abundant in the USA and you can primitive camp almost anywhere you want. Sometimes there are restrictions on campfires and how close you can camp to a water source. National Forests often offer a number of designated campsites for a small fee if you don't want to primitive camp. These campsites will often have potable water, a toilet, and sometimes a shower facility.

    State parks often have designated campsites, but in my experience, they are not very nice, and cost more than they are worth for a bad night of sleep.

    Private campgrounds are usually available near smaller cities, but they are usually not very nice (you will see signs for KOA).

    BLM land is a free for all - it is owned by the people and you can camp anywhere you want. All the roads are public access, and if you come to a fence, as long as it is not padlocked, you can pass though it - just make sure you close the gate behind you just as you found it. Ranchers lease this land from the federal government, so I try to stay away from their livestock including their pens, watering troughs, etc.

    Native Americans own a lot of land in the USA (Bureau of Indian Affairs). You are not allowed on the land unless you have permission from a tribal member, or the road you are on is a public access road. Even if you are on a public access road, like a highway or freeway that passes through the land, once you step off the road you are on tribal land and cannot camp there. In the USA, these lands are called Reservations (Ute Reservation, Paiute Reservation, Navajo Reservation, etc).

    Look at a satellite image of the USA. Wherever you see mountains and green, you will be able to find places to camp. The Southwest States like Arizona and New Mexico, although they do not look green on satellite, have a lot of public land and it's easy to find camping there. West of the Mississippi River, until you reach the Rocky Mountains, it is hard to find camping. I have travelled that area a lot and don't even bother trying to find camping in Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Indiana, Illinois, and Texas. California, although it has a lot of areas to camp, can be a bit challenging because the demand is so high, most of the land west of the Sierras is private, and there are more rules than other states.

    Regarding your hammock: I have exclusively camped with a hammock for a long time now. Traveling solo, I can always find a place to string a hammock, even in the deserts of the southwest. When traveling with a group, and the group decides where to camp, then I have problems. I do have a method for stringing a rainfly from my bike if I find myself sleeping on the ground.

    A mapping option is Rever. You can run it from a smart phone as an app, and plan your rides from a laptop or the app. They offer a premium service that Utilizes the Butler maps. Butler maps is a collection of the best motorcycle roads in the USA.

    There are also paper atlases called Gazetteers that show all roads, including unpaved roads, state by state. If you are traveling extensively in the mountain west states (Montana, Idaho, Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona), I recommend a gazetteer if you want to find unpaved roads.
    #58
  19. boatpuller

    boatpuller Long timer

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    It's interesting how different we find the same things. I find state park campgrounds to be some of the nicest campgrounds, usually with above average amenities. And in the west, off the beaten path, many small towns have campgrounds owned by the town, often in the city park. Don't be afraid to ask the local police if they know of a place you can "pitch your tent" for the night. If there is a city or local campground they can direct you.

    Do agree that all land in the USA is owned by someone, or something. Unless you get permission to camp on it, then you are trespassing. In the Midwest and Western USA, in rural areas, you can always stop at a farm house and ask if they know of a place you can "pitch your tent" for the night (avoid using the word "camping" as that tends to suggest staying for a while). Quite often the big-hearted farmers will offer you a place on the edge of their land to sleep for the night. And it is not unheard of to be asked in for dinner too. Or they may know of conservation land near by. But if they say no, then respect that. Be prepared to NOT have a fire when sleeping on someone's farm, as burning down their cropland or pastures is a very serious concern for them.
    #59
  20. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    I doubt you would be shot for camping on a Military base! BUT don't do it......you could be in for a very hard time.
    #60