VStrom Owners Thread

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by Queen, Jan 16, 2006.

  1. Hi-De-Ho

    Hi-De-Ho Mad Scientist

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2016
    Oddometer:
    1,573
    Location:
    Omnipresent
    Just posted an ad in the flea market for the sale of my Happy Trail rear racks...that will fit onto ANY of the later model year V-Stroms...650 or 1000.

    http://advrider.com/index.php?threads/v-strom-rear-rack-s-from-happy-trail.1276844/

    This is what I took off this morning:

    V-Strom HT Rear Rack 005.jpg

    And this is what it looks like now, with a new rear rack from Back Road Equipment, with allows for a slide-on....slide-off...rear top box. The top box is a Pelican Storm iM2700...which is big...but not too tall.

    V-Strom HT Rear Rack 009.jpg

    V-Strom HT Rear Rack 010.jpg
  2. Brutalguyracing

    Brutalguyracing Long timer

    Joined:
    May 15, 2013
    Oddometer:
    2,752
    Location:
    Long Island New York
    Fyi
    No one can read what you wrote in white in your ad
    Just a heads up

    Sent from my E6810 using Tapatalk
    Hi-De-Ho likes this.
  3. Brutalguyracing

    Brutalguyracing Long timer

    Joined:
    May 15, 2013
    Oddometer:
    2,752
    Location:
    Long Island New York
    Here is what it looks.like on phone
    [​IMG]

    Sent from my E6810 using Tapatalk
  4. PeterW

    PeterW Long timer

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2005
    Oddometer:
    3,763
    Location:
    Gold Coast
    Not unless it's the actual hose leaking. Usually it's the clamp and backing that off and re-tightening usually fixes it. The small leak there is fairly common and it's not due to poor quality hoses.
    husky390 likes this.
  5. Brutalguyracing

    Brutalguyracing Long timer

    Joined:
    May 15, 2013
    Oddometer:
    2,752
    Location:
    Long Island New York
    so with the frigid air mass moving out and temps climbing back to freezing its time to start ordering parts
    2016 dl650 approaching 13K
    i am looking for a new chain and sprockets
    didvx 525 is my brand of choice, anyplace note worthy of ordering from ($95 on amazon for 116 and $ 85 for 120 link ) go figure
    sprockets? oem? i know i want steel

    now on to brake pads? ebc, or oem?
    anything else anyone has to offer as in maintenance, besides the dreaded valve check (which i need to get prices on)
    thanks guys
  6. husky390

    husky390 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2017
    Oddometer:
    496
    Location:
    Colorado
    Thanks for the tip.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  7. Gustavo

    Gustavo Motociclista Errante

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2004
    Oddometer:
    3,205
    Location:
    Sometimes in Hillsburrito

    Do you really need chain/sprockets and brake pads at this mileage? What kind of wear are you seeing? Mine is getting close to 30K and still running all the OEM equipment that came with it. OTOH, I don't commute and ride very little in city traffic. Still, can't see how you'd kill the brake pads in that sort of mileage... :dunno Did you check that your brakes aren't dragging?

    The last few chain/sprocket sets I bought came from Sprocket Center you can choose you chain type and sprocket sizes for a custom kit. I like EBC pads, mostly because you can get several options and pick the type of pad that would work best for you.

    Gustavo
    Hi-De-Ho and Brutalguyracing like this.
  8. scootac

    scootac Just a Traveler

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2008
    Oddometer:
    8,005
    Location:
    Northcentral PA
    Looking to add Barbuster handguards to my '13 650, but damn if there seems to be enough room on the bars to hook them to. I know guys do, so what's the trick?
  9. Brutalguyracing

    Brutalguyracing Long timer

    Joined:
    May 15, 2013
    Oddometer:
    2,752
    Location:
    Long Island New York
    Just put them on my 16 without issue

    Sent from my E6810 using Tapatalk
  10. cyclopathic

    cyclopathic Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2007
    Oddometer:
    4,846
    I used EBC HH on many occasions and while they are usually step up from OEMs I don't like them; too hard on rotors and too grabby especially first couple Ks before copper/bronze works into rotors; too easy to lock wheel in emergency braking.

    My to-go pads nowdays are Sixity ceramic: very soft initial bite, progressive power, good in wet, long life and the full set for $20 from Sixity website, can't beat that. No they are not HH more likely GF rated, but with 4-pot conversion it ain't the problem.
  11. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

    Joined:
    May 29, 2002
    Oddometer:
    29,377
    Location:
    Fort Collins, Colorado
    http://www.adventuretech.biz/brake-pads-and-lines.html
  12. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

    Joined:
    May 29, 2002
    Oddometer:
    29,377
    Location:
    Fort Collins, Colorado
    So on abs equipped Stroms how do you flush old fluid from the abs pump & those lines? Does it have a bleed screw?
    Mitivac the only way?

    If you push out fluid from the front caliper nipples it only pushes fluid down from the master cylinder then past the abs junction and out the line to the nipple. You still have old fluid in the abs lines & pump from what I can see???
    cyclopathic and Hi-De-Ho like this.
  13. Hi-De-Ho

    Hi-De-Ho Mad Scientist

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2016
    Oddometer:
    1,573
    Location:
    Omnipresent
    Thank you for the heads up. I have corrected that, and it all should be readable now.

    BTW, those that truly have a "clever phone" can read my text, but those so-called "smart phones" leave some text invisible. :-) (joke)
    Brutalguyracing likes this.
  14. cyclopathic

    cyclopathic Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2007
    Oddometer:
    4,846
    I haven't seen any written info on it, maybe Pat (@greywolf) knows, but when I had 4-pot conversion done with Rich's AdventureTech adapters even after 3 full bleeds the lever was spongy.. the combination of time, bungee cording lever and triggering ABS on gravel helped to cure it. I had tried loosing up banjos air gets trapped there sometime but it didn't make much difference. They are b!tch to bleed. I know that some Stromtroopers have successfully tried bleeding with front wheel jacket above ABS pump if you have a ramp.

    If it were just refresh I would bleed until clear then go to gravel road, trigger abs multiple times then do full bleed again.

    Bimmer has 6 bleeding screw setup on servo pump which need to be bled in specific sequence we had spent a full day with friend figuring it out and getting his bike back on the road when his 1150 rear brake line expired in the middle of the ride and we had replacement made in local tractor repair shop but I don't think there is anything like that on Strom.
    The_Eccentric, eakins and Cryoman01 like this.
  15. guywithchickens

    guywithchickens Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2016
    Oddometer:
    322
    Location:
    Central CT
    I put on this a couple months ago on my '04 Wee:
    D.I.D (DKS-004) 525VX Chain and 15/47T Sprocket Kit
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00E0IK95O/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1
    Hi-De-Ho likes this.
  16. greywolf

    greywolf Unpaved road avoider

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,406
    Location:
    Evanston IL
    I don't have any further information on brake line bleeding than has already been mentioned. The Suzuki service manual makes no special mention of bleeding techniques on ABS models. In difficult cases, I would imagine cracking every connection open while under pressure for an instant in case there is an air bubble present would be one thing to try.
    eakins likes this.
  17. Gustavo

    Gustavo Motociclista Errante

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2004
    Oddometer:
    3,205
    Location:
    Sometimes in Hillsburrito

    Yes, you are right, normal bleeding doesn't really bleed the fluid that is actually in the ABS section. I reviewed the manual (several times, just in case I missed something), read the various threads here and on StromTrooper, and as CP says, there is no special bleeding procedure for the ABS bikes. My brakes were always a bit spongy. I have a friend that has an almost identical bike and his brakes are quite a bit firmer. I tried almost everything that was mentioned above, trying to bleed overnight (several times) by leaving the lever tied to the bar, cracking the connections open, etc. nothing made a significant difference. I have not tried bleeding while the rear wheel is spinning to activate the ABS. That sounds most promising as a technique, because it guarantees the pump allows fluid past through it.

    Gustavo
    eakins likes this.
  18. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

    Joined:
    May 29, 2002
    Oddometer:
    29,377
    Location:
    Fort Collins, Colorado
    Thanks for the input guys!

    I know the Super Tenere guys have had problems with ABS units going bad because of old fluid accumulated at the pump.

    There are 2 things I'm thinking of here:

    - changing front lines to braided and how I can be assured no air migrates into the abs lines.
    Sounds like changing the lines with the front of the bike raised should mitigate that potential.

    -old fluid stuck in the abs pump/lines. Sounds like a normal bleed and the agressive forced abs actuation on a dirt road should mix up fluid. Then another bleed and repeat.

    What about a mitivac? Would that pull from the abs unit and yet still allow fresh fluid in?
  19. LexLeroy

    LexLeroy Nerds Rule

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2011
    Oddometer:
    9,160
    Location:
    Lexington, KY
    It's doable, even w/ bars that have a cross-brace.

    [​IMG]

    The secret trick is lining up the swively do-dad that secures the inboard end of the long aluminum thing-a-ma-bob. (Pro tip - use blue Loctite.)
    The_Eccentric, Hi-De-Ho and scootac like this.
  20. ChocolateMoose

    ChocolateMoose n00b

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2017
    Oddometer:
    1
    Location:
    Overpelt (Belgium)
    I drove a BMW R1200 GS Adventure before buying a V-Strom 1000 XT last September. I serviced the Beemer myself. In order to flush the BMW ABS-module, I needed a device called the GS911. Apart from a large number of checks and analyses, it activates the pump of the ABS in a multiple circulating and flushing cycle. BMW-dealers do exactly the same with their BMW-service-computer. I would not be surprised that a Suzuki-mechanic would also need an electronic aid to correctly and completely flush and bleed the modern Suzuki ABS-system though.
    I could be terribly wrong, as I do not know the Strom well enough yet because it is quite hard to get hold of a reasonably priced workshop manual for my bike.
    2a2gtis likes this.