Yamaha Super Tenere XT1200Z build thread for a multi year RTW...

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by rtwpaul, Oct 9, 2015.

?

information required by tank manufacturer.....are you riding non ES or ES model

  1. Non ES

    73.1%
  2. ES

    26.9%
  1. rtwpaul

    rtwpaul out riding...

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    Soft luggage...

    obviously traveling as light as possible is the goal, we have done a bunch of test rides and been pretty good at only using the Jesse Luggage panniers and top box, but i decided to add a couple of things

    a tank bag, i literally got the smallest one i could find a Nelson Rigg, big enough to carry a camera and a few snacks and thats about it, the nice thing about it is the price less than $40 and it attaches with clips not a zip which would fail in time for sure and in the back are straps that convert it to a shoulder bag...spoiler alert i don't like tank bags!!!

    [​IMG]

    and maybe this Mosko Moto scout 30 liter will be coming along as a grocery getter

    [​IMG]


    and tonight the components for the front end arrived so i will be jumping into that in the next day or two
  2. Gupster

    Gupster Adventurer

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    Fresno

    Paul,

    As a lurker been enjoying your travels and bike builds.
    The wife, dog and I will be in Vegas for two weeks later this month, Thanksgiving week and the week after.
    Staying at Sam Town RV park. I'll be bringing my new to me s10 and my 625.
    If you have time for a beer or a ride give me a ring/pm.

    Thanks for all your write ups, as it relates to some of our like bike choices.

    Be safe in what you do!

    Gupster/Greg
  3. rtwpaul

    rtwpaul out riding...

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    sent you a PM
  4. daveburton

    daveburton Been here awhile

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    217

    My fork seals lasted about 11K miles that included the Dalton and the Dempster, if I had used the protectors I don't think I would have had the problems. I have them fitted now, I think this is very cheap insurance.
  5. Killacurb

    Killacurb Dad

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    PDX
    Paul,

    I have read all your rr and enjoyed them all. I am looking forward to your next the most, maybe because of the Super Tenere in my garage!? I have been looking at the neoprene fork socks some of the guys have been mentioning and am having a hard time deciding on which to get. Eagerly anticipating which ones you get and why. Keep up the good works, writing and pics, ride safe!
  6. Old Git Ray

    Old Git Ray Now retired...YeeHaa

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    In a nutshell, check them regularly, they settle down after a few thousand once the paint and burrs have gone although you are probably past that stage now.

    Also, loosen and re-tighten them to make sure none of them are over-tight.
    IMHO, there is nothing inherently wrong with the rims or spokes, they just need a lot of attention, certainly in the early stages, (compared to other bikes,) especially if you are going to seriously load the bike up for RTW type stuff.

    The spokes themselves do not break but they do come loose and lose the nipples, cable tie them together to stop them falling out if the nipple goes missing and also take some spare nipples. NB, there are, despite what others say, 3 lengths of spoke in the rear wheel although it is possible Yamaha have changed the longest ones in favour of 8 more medium length ones recently but the part numbers have not changed in the bikes life. The fronts have never caused me any problem.

    This is what happens when they are too tight.
    [​IMG]

    This shows the 3 lengths. When measured from absolute tip to tip these are the lengths.
    Long x 8 = 168mm. Used on outside on shaft side.
    Medium x 8 = 165mm. Used on outside on disk side.
    Short x 16 = 163mm. Used on inside of both sides.
    [​IMG]

    The inner spokes have a different head angle to the outer. Getting them mixed up will put undue pressure on the rim flange.
    [​IMG]

    While you are at it, keep an eye on your rear bearings. I noticed no difference in the handling but checked as a matter of course and this was the larger cush drive side bearing after around 24k miles.
    [​IMG]

    The bearing failure also made it's seat oversize (wore it away) so the new bearing - top right - went in loose and stayed that way for the next 25k miles. In essence I have had a slightly loose rear wheel since but have now fixed it with a center punch and bearing seal.

    As a side issue, I always carry a spare set and was able to replace the spares in Colombia. They are pretty standard sizes.
    Jud likes this.
  7. rtwpaul

    rtwpaul out riding...

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    great information thanks Ray
  8. rtwpaul

    rtwpaul out riding...

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    please go to the poll at the top of the page and vote if you are riding an ES or non ES

    this information is required for a tank manufacturer who is very interested in making a tank for the Super Tenere
  9. rtwpaul

    rtwpaul out riding...

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    So after Rays post i went and cleaned and checked my wheels, all good...so while i'm here i should do the swingarm???

    this is a long one, but i'll do it basically step by step

    remove rear wheel

    [​IMG]

    and straight away i'll go off at a tangent!!!

    the cush drive rubbers, if they go bad and none are available for any reasonyou can add inner tube strips, this is a thing i did on my XT660Z, the rubbers on that bike were lasting around 5-10,000 miles, added some inner tube and i was getting in excess of 50,000 miles...it'll take a little soapy water to make it all fit!!!

    this is from the 660 rear wheel

    [​IMG]

    ok back to the S10...

    double check the splines on the cush rubber holding plate thingy...all good

    [​IMG]
    bearing # for reference

    [​IMG]
    and the other bearing

    [​IMG]
    remove the four acorn nuts to take off the pumpkin, it will simply pull out of the swingarm...no gremlins hiding inside to fall out after it

    [​IMG]
    now see right in the middle of the photo a dark spot, well that s a hole, maybe a small drain hole but if its plugged it can't drain and could possibly allow moisture to collect...make sure it clear

    [​IMG]
    see daylight

    [​IMG]

    look around the splines and the seal of the pumpkin prior to cleaning check to see if there are any signs of oil residue, if so you'll need to do a reseal and need to get two parts and follow Greg the Poles excellent instructions here - https://thetenerist.wordpress.com/2014/09/28/yamaha-st12-inner-shaft-seal-replacement/

    his was bad and looked like this, if yours looks like this follow the above post ASAP

    img_7781.jpg

    on the other end of the shaft are splines, check these for wear...mine were very clean and no grease at all

    [​IMG]

    i greased it and put it aside for reassembly later

    [​IMG]

    this is the pumpkin end, again on mine very clean

    [​IMG]

    now to get the swingarm off

    remove lower exhaust clamp bolt

    [​IMG]
    take off the 10mm acorn nut just below the passenger grab rails so the exhaust cover can be removed, and you'll be left with this, there's a 14 mm nut on the back this all has to come off
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    and your passenger peg mount bolts as well

    [​IMG]

    this is a little rubber grommet at the very front just pull straight down if it hasn't already come off by itself
    [​IMG]
    and this will come off
    [​IMG]

    gently twist the exhaust can and pull upwards at the same time, don't be too rough as there is an exhaust gasket on the header pipe that needs to be reused, once you get it off you'll have a pile of parts on the floor and then your GF walks in and shouts WTF are you doing!!!

    ...cause to her half the motorcycle is on the floor, she'll be impressed in about an hour when it looks like a motorcycle again...tell her to go get you a beer while you do man stuff

    [​IMG]

    next take off the heel plates on both sides, and grab your 27mm socket, you don't have one? then grab your 1 1/16" socket, thats 26.9875mm so close enough
    [​IMG]
    make sure your brake is out of the way and the anchor is detached from the swingarm

    [​IMG]

    ...and this is where 'my' problems began, i grabbed a socket and expected to take the swing arm pivot bolt out, its only supposed to be with 87ftlbs of torque...nope

    grabbed a breaker bar...nope

    grabbed an air impact, set it low...nope

    increased it to max setting (600lbs impact!!!)...nope

    sent Greg the Pole a message to see if i had missed anything, i'd done it according to the manual, but you know how they like to miss little steps out, he's done a few and confirmed i was doing it right

    so i got out the magic juice Rost Off by Wurth...wurth...ahem the $15...this stuff wins every time,

    [​IMG]
    back on with the impact after a 5 minute creeping action beer break and out it came

    so the moral here is be prepared, even though my bike rarely sees rain (i live in the desert) it was still corroded in place, heat didn't help i tried that prior to the Rost Off

    this is the nut on the left size with the keep bracket holding it into the frame

    [​IMG]

    so before you pull the pivot shaft out, remove the lower shock bolt and the linkage bolts

    so you'll be pulling down and backwards for the swingarm to come free, but before you do that look up and spot the little clips to the right, they hold the shim to the frame, this may or may not drop out (thanks Greg for letting me know that) the tabs should hold it in place, mine did

    [​IMG]
    a little wiggle and it comes free, maneuver it around the lower shock

    [​IMG]
    clean any crap away

    [​IMG]
    now you should have your swingarm in your hands and be standing there being amazed how light it is!!!

    lay it on the floor and remove the end caps, using your hands no tools and the inner sleeve...see that yellow on there, thats good
    [​IMG]

    but clean it off because you are going to add fresh grease
    [​IMG]
    and look inside the end where the needle bearings are

    most Yamaha bearing use a hard packed yellow grease, below is a photo from a new bearing when i had to replace the swingarm on the 660...most people take Yamaha apart and think no grease was used...WRONG...do not...DO NOT remove the yellow stuff,

    [​IMG]
    just clean out any dirt if there is any and add some of your own favorite grease to the needle bearings and on the end caps

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    put you pivot shaft tube back in and you ready for reinstall

    but first look at the rubber boot that goes over the drive knuckle on the left side, it locks in place, look at the tabs and locate it correctly on the bike NOT on the swingarm this will make your life easier

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    this is the swingarm side, its plastic

    [​IMG]

    have a look down the swingarm left leg and make sure its clean, i had a build up of grease with some minor grit in it, this needs to go

    [​IMG]

    now put your swingarm back on and finger tight the pivot shaft

    [​IMG]

    now pull it out again and clean off any excess grease from the threads

    [​IMG]

    now repeat that, this is the second time it caught grease again

    [​IMG]

    once you are happy you won't have grease on the threads add a little blue loctite and assemble and torque to 87 ftlbs per the manual

    now pull the rubber boot over the knuckle

    [​IMG]

    double check your lower shock pivot and your dog bone pivots for cleanliness and grease and deal with accordingly

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    if you've never looked at your rear brake pads now would be a good time

    [​IMG]

    take a measurement if you want, minimum per the factory service manual is 0.8mm thickness

    [​IMG]

    so i have more than 50% left after 17,000 miles...most guy are saying 12 - 18,000 miles from stock pads??? Guess i should use my brakes more!!!

    [​IMG]

    remember if you have to pry your pads apart pump up your rear brake once you put the wheel on

    put your exhaust and rear wheel back on and your done...double check your back brake before you ride

    Greg said around 1 1/2 hours from a complete bike back to a complete bike with a swingarm regrease service...i would agree, it took me around an hour and i was taking photos as i went but i'm used this stuff and my bike was on a lift which makes life a lot easier.

    Do this job yourself, its easy...don't give your money to the dealership




    from here i did a rear tire change as well but that's for another time...
    Race Ready, Tallbastid, Don T and 3 others like this.
  10. Jud

    Jud Long timer

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    Great post, thanks.
  11. adventurebound9517

    adventurebound9517 Been here awhile

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    WOW, talk about step by step. Makes me want to go out and buy an S 10 just to work on it......maybe not. You my friend are a wealth of knowledge along with the rest of the world travelers.
    Phillip
    Tallbastid likes this.
  12. Old Git Ray

    Old Git Ray Now retired...YeeHaa

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    Paul, I had (as everyone does) the cush drive rubbers die in my XT660Z.

    Fortunately the S10 does not suffer from the same fate. Mine are still all but new 50k miles on.
    rtwpaul likes this.
  13. Mofrid

    Mofrid Been here awhile

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    +1
    Superb, yes thank you.
  14. Greg the pole

    Greg the pole Been here awhile

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    Calgary, AB
    Great write up Paul. Pictures are first rate as well. I'll link this to the blog
    rtwpaul likes this.
  15. BergDonk

    BergDonk Old Enough to Know Better

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    Nice writeup on the swingarm. FWIW, an apologies if its mentioned and I missed it, when reassembling, leave the pumpkin acorn nuts a bit loose until until the wheel is in place and axle tightened up. This gets the alignment right.
    rtwpaul likes this.
  16. rtwpaul

    rtwpaul out riding...

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    i did this as a matter of course but because i didn't take any photos of it i forgot to add...thanks for the reminder
  17. rtwpaul

    rtwpaul out riding...

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    tire change...

    [​IMG]
    so the tools i use are

    [​IMG]
    i'm not going to review the whole process, there are plenty of videos on youtube showing how to remove and replace a tire...what i will say is i find the heidenau k60 rear difficult to remove from the rim but putting front and rear on is easy as there is plenty of dip in the middle of the rim and a little soapy water to make this an easy task

    if you are doing your tires at home or on the road and not balancing them, remember to line up the red dots with your valve stem

    [​IMG]

    on the rear rim, i changed the valve stem to a metal 45 degree but then i had to change it back


    READ POST #244 TO SEE WHY




    the rear tire had just about reached the wear bar mark, if i was on the road i would probably ride this tire another 500 miles crossing my fingers that it would hold, but here where tires are available i change

    [​IMG]
    you can see the wear bar mark on both tire in the same place, about 11 o'clock on the tire, in the left side of the tread

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    and for reference depth of tread for

    front
    [​IMG]

    and rear

    [​IMG]

    and how i keep track of my service intervals/ tire changes/ mpg on the road, in the lid of the top box. I see it every time i open the box so a constant reminder to check the bike...i do everything in km's because its round figures, except the liters per 100km, to me it doesn't register as well as MPG.

    I will do an oil change prior to leaving or at 30k to round things up to even 10's...and as mentioned before i do the final drive every oil change not every otherr oil change like the manual suggests, 200 milliliters is very cheap insurance for an expensive part

    [​IMG]

    so looking at the above numbers

    rear tire 8k or 4971 miles this was a stock Bridgestone battlewing, the next tire was a Heidenau K60, 98% ridden two up, and about 60% fully loaded 19,400k or 11,806 miles, then just changed to another heidenau

    front tire same Bridgestone battlewing, 18.2k or 11,309 miles...changed it to a Shinko 705 to see the wear, it is good on the front, the tire still has around 80% tread left on it after 9.2k or 5716 miles or about 5mm - (and if anyone is in the Vegas area and wants this tire, come and get it, send me a PM)

    [​IMG]
    Tallbastid likes this.
  18. BergDonk

    BergDonk Old Enough to Know Better

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    When you get to Oz, come visit. Shed, beer, bed, tour guide etc available.
  19. sallydog

    sallydog https://sallydog.smugmug.com/Pets/LD-Travel/

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    these shock covers are cheap and go on with velcro, no disassemble required. i started using them after a fork seal leak in the desert. They come all colors, front or rear

    Attached Files:

    rtwpaul and Killacurb like this.
  20. rtwpaul

    rtwpaul out riding...

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    Neck bearings...

    so the more you ride into remote places and you aren't near a big city/ dealership/ your garage you will be doing the majority of the work on your bike yourself. Do you have the right tools and do you know how easy or difficult a process is to do the neck bearing or any other bearing?

    Case in point, the neck bearings; i go to grab my neck bearing nut tool and can't find it, so i placed an order for a new one, but it got me to thinking if i did this in the field, without a torque wrench how difficult would it be?

    but as an example that it can an will happen

    Bolivia 2011, neck bearing cage failure
    [​IMG]
    Utah 2012
    [​IMG]
    Idaho 2014
    [​IMG]

    i have more but you get the point, you might want to practice and double check your tools in the comfort of your garage


    So...again this is not the ideal way to do this but its the way to get you home or to a shop!!!

    remove top nut, 27mm same as axel wrench...you may or may not have to lift you tank to do this and maybe remove bars...with risers you don't there's plenty of room
    [​IMG]
    undo to triple clamp pinch bolts
    [​IMG]
    lift off top tree
    [​IMG]
    there is an alignment clip, remove this first
    [​IMG]
    then check out the dirt and remove the top nut
    [​IMG]
    make a visible mark on the lower nut and the frame for reference
    [​IMG]
    get your tool...in my case this time its a hammer and flat blade screw driver

    ***my neck bearings felt OK so i knew the torque setting was approximately right

    see that rubber washer, that lives between the two nuts, when you take off the lower nut count the full rotations, this will be your "in the field approximate torque setting"
    [​IMG]
    now take out the top bearing, you may need a push down on the rear end to make the front end lift and help the bearing release, and if you haven't seen it yet there should be a shim on top of the bearing
    [​IMG]
    choices to get to the lower bearing...remove front wheel and the whole suspension set up will drop (best) or the other, more work but if you are solo, a better option; make a mark on your fork legs right below your lower triple tree, this is to make reassembly easier
    [​IMG]
    check your lower bearing for grease dirt then clean and re-grease in location (forgot the clean re-greased photo!)
    [​IMG]
    bearing #
    [​IMG]

    clean your top bearing and re-grease it
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    and a little grease on the dust cover to reduce more dust/ sand/ dirt getting to the top bearing
    [​IMG]
    put it all back together and make sure your lines are aligned
    [​IMG]
    put your top tree back on, tighten the side allen bolts and test if everything is good, not too tight (fall away/ no stiction) side to side normal movement of the bars and then grab the bottom of both forks with the bike on the center stand lift slight and pull forwards and backwards, if there is movement then your need to go back and tighten your lower nut on the steering stem...if it feels good tighten top triple clamp nut to spec and ride home/ to shop...double check all your work with a torque wrench ASAP
    Screen Shot 2015-11-10 at 2.06.48 PM.png

    [​IMG]
    .bv, Race Ready, Don T and 5 others like this.