Yamaha WR250R Threadfest

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by gjcarving, Nov 23, 2013.

  1. xy500

    xy500 Loser

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    yes, had a couple.
    Wasn't until i rode something better i regretted wasting my time on one
    #61
  2. theMISSIONARY

    theMISSIONARY hunting and riding!!

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    Take one DR650 rider....string them up....force soapy water down throat until internally cleansed of such evil of liking a Dr650 :evil


    i dont regret owning a DR650 but i would only have one again if it was given to me :deal
    #62
  3. motoman250f

    motoman250f Been here awhile

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    Would you take your ktm to alaska? Will it go 40K miles with only a minor inspection? ever heard of a gearbox problem on a wr? will you add heated gear and grips on a ktm and not worry about overloading the electrical system? Will 08 ktm parts fit a 14? (dual sports dont change much, thats good and bad)

    I'm a ktm lover but not for short distance adventure/dual sport riding.
    #63
  4. bobfab

    bobfab Long timer

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    the best part of this thread, is that the OP doesnt specify what the intended purpose of him/her buying a WR is. Just do you regret it.

    I think for a EFI low mainentance dualsport they are tough to beat, but as an enduro/race/trail bike they sure can. Those who havent ridden an orange bike vs a WR on the trail are really in the dark. There is no comparison... really go head and try it :D
    #64
  5. TNC

    TNC Candyass Camper

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    Very good points. I love KTM's. They're great bikes. But I can't believe people try to put them in the same category as a WRR or KLX...or vice versa. Just because you can put a plate on a KTM, it doesn't magically morph into an anvil-like dual sport...and that's both good and bad. The good is that you can line up your KTM at a local enduro and actually be competitive. And while you can ride most enduros on a WRR or KLX, unless you're Malcolm Smith reincarnated you won't be very competitive and you will feel the pain if you finish.

    Healthy horsepower and lighter weight...like a KTM and the like...almost always come with some price. That's not a bad thing...just a thing that usually exists. KTM's are not glass slippers by any means. You don't have to tiptoe around with them, but they are not designed to pack up and hit the road...and then hit some decently serious off road when you get there. The WRR, KLX, and CRFL are so durable in the engine and frame department because they have such comparatively low horsepower and weigh more because of their burlier frames.

    Picking "one bike" is a serious application exercise. If you're always going to tote your bike to the riding area and ride some decently gnarly terrain...not touring off the bike...but still need street legal status...a KTM style bike should fit nicely. And please note, I'm not saying that it's impossible to tour off of an EXC and such. The more pavement and dirt road miles that are required, the closer you get to appreciating a capable DS bike like mentioned here. While the larger displacement DS bikes certainly have their place, they become a handful as trail and 2-track riding becomes more challenging. I've ridden the big DS bikes like the KLR, DR, and XRL, and unless I'm touring off the bike, they're just too big to really enjoy off roading. Not impossible but usually quite punishing.

    I'll repeat, however, that in all honesty it's nearly impossible to claim absolutes in many of the bike choices we're talking about here. There is only the possibility that the right tool for the specific job exists, but even that can be a moving target when so many different riders and preferences exist.
    #65
    dubcapo and scatch like this.
  6. Foot dragger

    Foot dragger singletracker

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    You may well have been dropped on your head and forgotten about it.:rofl

    Hop on that WR250,Ride it to Death Valley and back doing 1400 miles of pavement at 75mph fully loaded with a good amount of heavy wind,then take the load off it and ride it through bottomless sand and rocks with vertical climbs. Then figure out if its the bike for you.

    DR does this with out straining at 50mpg.
    #66
  7. Hodakaguy

    Hodakaguy NorthWest Adventure Rider

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    I'd take a KTM to Alaska...not my 530 but a KTM for sure :evil. Would my 530 make the trip, you bet it would but that's not what I bought it for.

    This is really the main issue here....each individual person has to define "Adventure Riding" and "Dual Sport" for themselves. Some will want to head to Alaska with theirs (in which case a WRR would be WAY at the bottom of my list) and others like myself like to cover 1000's of miles of fast paced off road exploring/riding with very little pavement. Some will want a "Dual Sport" to lean more on the street side, some more to the dirt side.

    Neither is the wrong choice depending on what the rider is wanting/expecting out of the bike. The original question was did anyone regret their WRR purchase? Like stated earlier I know two people who did regret their purchase and the WRR wasn't the bike for them, in the end they weren't as concerned about not having to wrench on a bike as having the bike perform to a higher level on the trail. Both liked the high performing suspension, gobs of low end torque (not having to rev the crap out of the bike all the time), and the better handling/steering of their new bikes.

    The whole KTM maint thing is way overblown in most cases. Lack of maint always seems to come up when comparing WRR's to other bikes. If your primary concern is not one of performance but the ability to not check/adjust valves in a zillion miles (usually the first fact stated) then it may be the perfect bike for you.:thumb Like stated before the valves on my 530 hold extremely tight and go 100's of hrs without need for adjustment, and I can check them in 15 min flat! If/When they do need adjustment it's a simple procedure that can quickly be accomplished in under 45 minutes.

    Yes the KTM manual (and most performance oriented bike manuals) recommend changing parts often. If you take the exact same WRR and said I'm going to track ride this baby then Yamaha would have written the manual different and recommend higher service intervals for that bike as well. In reality even bikes like the 530 can go hundreds of hrs without changing pistons, cam chains etc etc with no harmful side effects. They can be and are super reliable.

    Extra electrical capacity...easy add an aftermarket stator and problem fixed. Parts for a 14 fit a 08....who cares. Not aware of any gear box problems, mine have been stone reliable. Can work the same way for the WRR as well....WRR lacking in suspension...aftermarket suspension, low on power add aftermarket pipes and tuners, on and on.

    Do you have to work on a higher performance bike more....probably yes. Is the extra fun factor worth a little more work....it is for me! :freaky

    Hodakaguy
    #67
  8. Foot dragger

    Foot dragger singletracker

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    So you've had 3 530's,on average how many hours do you keep the things before selling them to get a fresher one?
    #68
  9. Hodakaguy

    Hodakaguy NorthWest Adventure Rider

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    My first 530 was a 09 that I purchased new, had 180 hrs on it when I sold it to by a loaded 2010 that a friend was selling. My 09 was running like new at the time (and still is) but I got a great deal on the 10 and basically swapped bikes for free and started over at 20hrs or so. I sold the 10 with around 130 hrs on it to fund my VW Bus project. Now that the VW is done I picked up a used 2011 530 with around 50hrs on it and have been enjoying it since.

    I have other friends with 300+ hrs on theirs. When it needs a top end I'll rebuild it...I'm not worried about throwing some parts at it when it's finally time, totally worth it for the performance it returns :1drink

    Hodakaguy
    #69
  10. Foot dragger

    Foot dragger singletracker

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    It does seem like it would be simpler to keep one and set it up then go ahead and put the 600 or 900 hours on it.
    Beings they're so reliable and long lasting.

    Ive had a few friends do just that,they figured its the bike for them and they just ride and ride it.
    Eventually the bikes are sold as fixers or parts bikes for 1000.00 or less,kind of a diminishing returns deal on rebuilds it seems,each rebuild lasts a less amount of hours till the crank and head are suspect.

    Great bikes though,Ive had KTM's since 1978 and just bought my 15th,maybe 16th. 2014 XCW 300,its a goer.
    #70
  11. Hodakaguy

    Hodakaguy NorthWest Adventure Rider

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    I'm not worried about doing overhauls or engine work. A properly rebuilt engine should give you years of service back. I'd say in the case of the ktm that between 200-300hrs you will be doing a top end, piston, rings etc. Just the price you pay for this level of performance and I'm fine with that. For my kind of riding that's totally acceptable to me as I'd rather deal with that than 900hrs of riding a lesser bike just because it lasts longer.

    I've never had a 300 smoker...would like to try one for single track though :-)

    Hodakaguy
    #71
  12. Navin

    Navin Long timer

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    Treat a EXC like a DS bike and the parts wear/maintenance will be very minimal.

    Treat a WRR like an enduro bike and parts wear/maintenance will be extensive, as will your medical bills.

    My brother put over 40k miles on a street ridden MXC450 motard. It ran great when we parted it out, everything in spec and miles noted in the ads on ktmtalk classifieds.

    There is a 7k mile WR250R engine rebuild thread ongoing in this forum right now.

    If I took either for a street ride of 400 miles, I'd park them in the garage and go to bed. If I took either to a 100 mile enduro, I'd change the oil, clean the filter, wash them both and be done.

    What is the difference?
    #72
  13. Foot dragger

    Foot dragger singletracker

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    This 300 runs better and smoother then any of the 300's Ive had before,KTM continues to improve the breed.
    It climbs huge granite steps like a Trials bike,shows no signs of stalling or quitting pulling. Pulls from near 0 revs predictably and just pulls and pulls with out doing anything very sudden,its as much like a 4 stroke as a 2 stroke can be. Ive never had any of my previous 300's overheat on super tight steep switchbacks.
    It will wheelie out of most any corner all day long,almost too much fun!

    A local guy got a 2013 300 plated and put 3500 miles on it on trails in woods and desert,he put a piston in at that point but the old one still measured fine. KTM has got 2 strokes down pretty darn good.
    #73
  14. Foot dragger

    Foot dragger singletracker

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    Im always hearing about these 40K KTM engines,but have never stood close to one. Ive never been around one that cleared 12000 miles with out coming apart for work.
    Does pavement riding make them last THAT much longer?

    Why would you part it out if it was still such a solid bike?

    I agree on the medical bills thing,I rode a DRZe on a long technical desert trip once and the danger was obvious,that thing bottomed/wallowed/sketched around/tried to pitch me off cliffs.
    Even with suspension work it was a hazard and was sold upon re-entry to town.

    But sometimes a lot of dualsport riding is just riding along not doing anything spectacular,then,on a full boat KTM your using a race bike for a sight seeing bike.
    There's no perfect answer for the dual sport riddle.
    #74
  15. Navin

    Navin Long timer

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    Jimmy Lewis tore down a dirt ridden/raced EXC*** magazine test bike at 30,000 miles that was all within spec. They are out there.

    It got parted cause our state was looking to follow Ca. in recinding tags on "questionable" bikes.
    #75
  16. TNC

    TNC Candyass Camper

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    :D
    Navin, I doubt you're using the 7K WRR engine rebuild incident as the standard for WRR service intervals...right?:lol3

    But seriously, I think you may have put your finger on something substantive. Maybe all the bikes being discussed here have gotten so reliable as to make our discussion on the matter moot. I'm good with that.:D

    I'm still lusting after the KTM690 as "the one" bike for me, but lottery success will have to occur for me in that case.:lol3
    #76
  17. jckid

    jckid Been here awhile

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    I sold my 610 Husky and replaced it with a WR. At first I was kind of like, what was I thinking!:huh I actually bought the WR before selling the Husky, and I just almost backed out on selling the Husky...but in the end, I let it go. There's no comparison between the power each puts out. But now I am actually very happy with my decision to downsize. The WR is a great bike. It fits me better, and I can ride it to it's full potential, unlike the Husky. Now the only thing I should mention is that I'm very lightweight. The bike works great for me. For a rider twice my weight, I think the WR would be a little lacking, depending on how it's used. But I rode it on a 2,000+ mile trip last summer, and it worked out great. I'm hoping to ride it to Alaska in 2014.
    #77
  18. ParaMud

    ParaMud Been here awhile

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    There are 2 owners from what I see from WR250r. Those who came down from the big bikes, (klr, dr, xl) and those who came from real dirt bikes.

    Im from the KLR way. Never ridden a ktm or a real dirt bike. Do I want one? Yes!

    Also being from california, the only option is a ktm or a heavyier dual sport. Or buy an old plated dirt bike.

    I love it for riding around to the trails, single track and all, and not worrying about it. I still truck it places to.

    I am happy with my purchase, just need to re do the suspension, which is a standard for most bikes, and I can do it myself.


    If you are coming from a lighter dirt bike, then you will think it is heavy and low on power. But from my perspective it isnt.

    :freaky

    Just get a bike and ride!
    #78
  19. Foot dragger

    Foot dragger singletracker

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    Dang,Im always hearing about the rescinding of tags,that would suck after jumping the hoops to get a plate.
    It hasnt happened here in nor cal that Ive ever heard of.
    But it could.

    Damn would it take a long time to put 30,000 miles on a trail/race bike,a person would have to really like to ride. Again no local KTM 4 stroke has ever done anything remotely like that. Some are really good I guess.

    A friend who rides enduros put 10K on an 07 300,then he put a piston in and it turned out the rear of his airbox had a hole to throw dirt through, and his air filter cage was warped probably letting dirt in. There was a chunk of chrome missing from the upper rear of the bore,he said screw it and me and a buddy stuck it back together as to his wishes.

    Hes ridden it straight through since then at enduros and trailrides and it runs the same as ever,Im amazed.
    His theory is ride it and forget it,get a new one when it dies.
    #79
  20. Foot dragger

    Foot dragger singletracker

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    Ive heard the WR250R is smooth on the hiway even at higher revs and gets great mileage even doing that.
    #80